Posts tagged food

Food Maps
Via Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves:

In this series we have taken many of the iconic foods of countries and continents and turned them into physical maps. While we know that tomatoes originally came from the Andes in South America, Italy has become the tomato king. These maps show how food has traveled the globe — transforming and becoming a part of the cultural identity of that place.

H/T: Slate.

Food Maps

Via Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves:

In this series we have taken many of the iconic foods of countries and continents and turned them into physical maps. While we know that tomatoes originally came from the Andes in South America, Italy has become the tomato king. These maps show how food has traveled the globe — transforming and becoming a part of the cultural identity of that place.

H/T: Slate.

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog
A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog

A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

Some Japanese Animal Donuts to Take You Into the Weekend
The perfect snack for any newsroom.
Want more? Visit Kotaku.

Some Japanese Animal Donuts to Take You Into the Weekend

The perfect snack for any newsroom.

Want more? Visit Kotaku.

Food and Farming Journalism Fellowships from UC Berkeley

Like food? Like journalism? Then UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism has a fellowship for you:

Beginning in 2013, UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism will each year offer five $10,000 postgraduate Food and Farming Journalism Fellowships in a new program established by Michael Pollan, the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism at UC Berkeley. The fellowship, a project of the Knight Center in Science and Environmental Journalism, is supported by a grant from The 11th Hour Project, a program of The Schmidt Family Foundation.

Aimed at early and mid-career journalists, the Fellowship presents an opportunity to report ambitious longform stories on the full range of subjects under the rubric of food systems: agricultural and nutritional policy, the food industry, food science, technology and culture, rural and urban farming, agriculture and the environment (including climate change), global trade and supply chains, consolidation and securitization of the food system and public health as it relates to food and farming. In 2013 we will award five, early and mid-career journalists $10,000 to travel and report these stories.

The fellowship is open to both print and radio journalists; in future years, it will expand to include multi-media and video journalists. We will give preference to U.S. focused stories, but will also consider international stories with a U.S. angle or connection.

Deadline: April 1, 2013. Visit the Food Fellows Web site for details.

Just Another Seven-Acre-Large QR Code
Via TechSpot:

Kraay Family Farm, a Canadian-based grower nestled near the town of Lacombe, has set the world’s record for creating the largest QR code ever made. If that weren’t enough, what makes this QR code even more special is its composition: farmers carved out the QR code from a gigantic corn field. The Minecraftian feat covers 7 acres or about 95,000 square feet and incidentally doubles as the largest corn maze on record…
…When Kraay was asked about how he came up with the idea, he told Canadian television journalists, “I was just relaxing, reading a magazine and saw a whole bunch of QR codes and I thought, you know, it looked a whole lot like a maze I wonder if we can make one”.

And yes, it supposedly works. And yes, the Guinness Book of World Records does have a category for world’s largest QR code. And yes, this is it.
So now you know. You can even visit if you happen to find yourself near Lacombe, Alberta.

Just Another Seven-Acre-Large QR Code

Via TechSpot:

Kraay Family Farm, a Canadian-based grower nestled near the town of Lacombe, has set the world’s record for creating the largest QR code ever made. If that weren’t enough, what makes this QR code even more special is its composition: farmers carved out the QR code from a gigantic corn field. The Minecraftian feat covers 7 acres or about 95,000 square feet and incidentally doubles as the largest corn maze on record…

…When Kraay was asked about how he came up with the idea, he told Canadian television journalists, “I was just relaxing, reading a magazine and saw a whole bunch of QR codes and I thought, you know, it looked a whole lot like a maze I wonder if we can make one”.

And yes, it supposedly works. And yes, the Guinness Book of World Records does have a category for world’s largest QR code. And yes, this is it.

So now you know. You can even visit if you happen to find yourself near Lacombe, Alberta.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko
FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?
UPDATE, via Eater:
But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko

FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?

UPDATE, via Eater:

But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.
Sometimes You Just Really Need a Burrito
Well, I do. And so I was terribly excited when I first saw this on GOOD:

Have you ever dreamed of a warm, tortilla-wrapped bundle of joy after a long night out or on a bleary-eyed morning, only to find your favorite taco shop closed? Maybe you just have an unhealthy addiction to these penny-saving, bean, meat, cheese, oranything-filled savory and cylindrical meals that will fill you up pronto. 
If you can relate, you’re in for a treat. The customizable, 3-D Burritob0t prototype will print your dream burrito ingredients straight onto a tortilla. The invention is the work of interactive designer Marko Manriquez, who created the project while studying at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and he hopes to bring it to life with a Kickstarter campaign.
Manriquez calls his Burritob0t “Tex-Mex 3D Printing.” The b0t features disposable syringes to print ingredients including beans, rice, cheese, sour cream, corn, guacamole, and of course salsa picante. As long as it’s in paste form, any ingredient can be attached to the printer. 
The machine is connected with a smartphone app, which offers the burrito-lover flexibility in controlling the meal. The user selects the level of each ingredient according to a numbered scale. The app enables Manriquez to track user taste preferences in a database and visualize the data.
Curious to see the Burritob0t in action? Manriquez plans to hold a public demo this summer in New York City. He is also working on a 5-course meal exhibition: each course will be prepared (or printed) from the syringes of a different bot. 

FJP: The concept is completely genius and I have burrito cravings often enough to seriously appreciate a burrito-maker connected to my smartphone, which is connected to my brain, which is connected to my tummy, which causes my insatiable burrito cravings. On the other hand, syringes freak me out a little and I don’t know how I feel about my food coming out of them. But still, innovation & burritos. Two keys to a happy life.—Jihii

Sometimes You Just Really Need a Burrito

Well, I do. And so I was terribly excited when I first saw this on GOOD:

Have you ever dreamed of a warm, tortilla-wrapped bundle of joy after a long night out or on a bleary-eyed morning, only to find your favorite taco shop closed? Maybe you just have an unhealthy addiction to these penny-saving, bean, meat, cheese, oranything-filled savory and cylindrical meals that will fill you up pronto. 

If you can relate, you’re in for a treat. The customizable, 3-D Burritob0t prototype will print your dream burrito ingredients straight onto a tortilla. The invention is the work of interactive designer Marko Manriquez, who created the project while studying at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and he hopes to bring it to life with a Kickstarter campaign.

Manriquez calls his Burritob0t “Tex-Mex 3D Printing.” The b0t features disposable syringes to print ingredients including beans, rice, cheese, sour cream, corn, guacamole, and of course salsa picante. As long as it’s in paste form, any ingredient can be attached to the printer. 

The machine is connected with a smartphone app, which offers the burrito-lover flexibility in controlling the meal. The user selects the level of each ingredient according to a numbered scale. The app enables Manriquez to track user taste preferences in a database and visualize the data.

Curious to see the Burritob0t in action? Manriquez plans to hold a public demo this summer in New York City. He is also working on a 5-course meal exhibition: each course will be prepared (or printed) from the syringes of a different bot. 

FJP: The concept is completely genius and I have burrito cravings often enough to seriously appreciate a burrito-maker connected to my smartphone, which is connected to my brain, which is connected to my tummy, which causes my insatiable burrito cravings. On the other hand, syringes freak me out a little and I don’t know how I feel about my food coming out of them. But still, innovation & burritos. Two keys to a happy life.—Jihii

The Common North American Belly
Yes, I’m hungry. No, I haven’t eaten today.
But I have been playing with FoodMood, an interactive visualization project that pulls data from Twitter about how people relate to the foods they mention while posting.
Via FoodMood:

Using geo-located tweets as a primary data source together with natural language processing techniques and public access data from WHO and CIA Factbook, we capture and analyze, in real time, the foods that people are tweeting about in their cities and how they feel about them…
…As a sentiment analysis tool, FoodMood develops a more informed global picture about food and emotion. As a datavisualization project, FoodMood shows the connections, patterns and relationships that exist between the variables — insights that are otherwise practically infeasible. Ultimately, FoodMood helps reveal a hidden layer of digital and social data that pushes the boundaries of awareness and understanding of our surrendings one step further.
The data that drives FoodMood is from Twitter. We scrape Twitter in real time and assign a sentiment rating to any tweet about food. So if someone said they just ate a cake and they love it the sentiment rating will be high. If they ate a snail and it made them feel weird (and they tweeted that) then the sentiment rating would be low. We only use English-language tweets on FoodMood.

Got that?
So, what we’re looking at above is a comparison of Canada, Mexico and the United States. Each has salad, eggs, pancakes, pizza, cake and sandwiches among their top 10 most mentioned foods, and each has the same mood about them.
Sticking within the top 10, Mexico and the United States share a love for chipotle and tacos. Strong choices and yes I’m getting hungry.
Of the three countries, Canada is the thinnest but least happy. The United States appears (at least for those tweeting away) fat and happy.
I’m off to lunch (tuna melt panini if you’re interested), but give the site a play. You can compare foods, moods, countries, look at data at a particular point in time, or over a period of time. — Michael
Image: Screenshot of FoodMood comparing food sentiment as measured via Twitter Posts in Canada, Mexico and the United States.
Select image to embiggen.
H/T: Infosthetics

The Common North American Belly

Yes, I’m hungry. No, I haven’t eaten today.

But I have been playing with FoodMood, an interactive visualization project that pulls data from Twitter about how people relate to the foods they mention while posting.

Via FoodMood:

Using geo-located tweets as a primary data source together with natural language processing techniques and public access data from WHO and CIA Factbook, we capture and analyze, in real time, the foods that people are tweeting about in their cities and how they feel about them…

…As a sentiment analysis tool, FoodMood develops a more informed global picture about food and emotion. As a datavisualization project, FoodMood shows the connections, patterns and relationships that exist between the variables — insights that are otherwise practically infeasible. Ultimately, FoodMood helps reveal a hidden layer of digital and social data that pushes the boundaries of awareness and understanding of our surrendings one step further.

The data that drives FoodMood is from Twitter. We scrape Twitter in real time and assign a sentiment rating to any tweet about food. So if someone said they just ate a cake and they love it the sentiment rating will be high. If they ate a snail and it made them feel weird (and they tweeted that) then the sentiment rating would be low. We only use English-language tweets on FoodMood.

Got that?

So, what we’re looking at above is a comparison of Canada, Mexico and the United States. Each has salad, eggs, pancakes, pizza, cake and sandwiches among their top 10 most mentioned foods, and each has the same mood about them.

Sticking within the top 10, Mexico and the United States share a love for chipotle and tacos. Strong choices and yes I’m getting hungry.

Of the three countries, Canada is the thinnest but least happy. The United States appears (at least for those tweeting away) fat and happy.

I’m off to lunch (tuna melt panini if you’re interested), but give the site a play. You can compare foods, moods, countries, look at data at a particular point in time, or over a period of time. — Michael

Image: Screenshot of FoodMood comparing food sentiment as measured via Twitter Posts in Canada, Mexico and the United States.

Select image to embiggen.

H/T: Infosthetics

Nine-Year-Old Blogger 1, Bad School Food 0
Via Wired:

For the past two months, one of my favorite reads has been Never Seconds, a blog started by 9-year-old Martha Payne of western Scotland to document the unappealing, non-nutritious lunches she was being served in her public primary school. Payne, whose mother is a doctor and father has a small farming property, started blogging in early May and went viral in days. She had a million viewers within a few weeks and 2 million this morning; was written up in Time, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and a number of food blogs; and got support from TV cheflebrity Jamie Oliver, whose series “Jamie’s School Dinners” kicked off school-food reform in England.
Well, goodbye to all that.
This afternoon, Martha (who goes by “Veg” on the blog) posted that she will have to shut down her blog, because she has been forbidden to take a camera into school.

At which point the Internet erupted.
Today, Wired comes back with this update:

So much happened overnight:
Huge amounts of public support, including from Jamie Oliver (who tweeted “Stay strong, Martha!”) and Neil Gaiman.
214 news articles worldwide in the past 12 hours.
Another half-million pageviews at the NeverSeconds blog (and almost 1,000 comments on her Goodbye post, up from about 150 when I posted last night).
The Guardian proposed that people take pictures of their lunches and tweet them #MyLunchforMartha

Also today, the Argyll and Bute Council, whose decision it was to ban Martha’s photography, relented. Back to Wired:

…[T]he leader of the Argyll and Bute Council, Roddy McCuish, [just] went on the BBC’s World At One program on Radio 4 and announced they were backing off the ban in response to a request from Scotland’s education minister along with vast pressure from social media.

Lesson: Don’t mess with a nine-year-old blogger.
Image: Martha Payne’s lunch from May 25, via NeverSeconds.

Nine-Year-Old Blogger 1, Bad School Food 0

Via Wired:

For the past two months, one of my favorite reads has been Never Seconds, a blog started by 9-year-old Martha Payne of western Scotland to document the unappealing, non-nutritious lunches she was being served in her public primary school. Payne, whose mother is a doctor and father has a small farming property, started blogging in early May and went viral in days. She had a million viewers within a few weeks and 2 million this morning; was written up in Time, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and a number of food blogs; and got support from TV cheflebrity Jamie Oliver, whose series “Jamie’s School Dinners” kicked off school-food reform in England.

Well, goodbye to all that.

This afternoon, Martha (who goes by “Veg” on the blog) posted that she will have to shut down her blog, because she has been forbidden to take a camera into school.

At which point the Internet erupted.

Today, Wired comes back with this update:

So much happened overnight:

  • Huge amounts of public support, including from Jamie Oliver (who tweeted “Stay strong, Martha!”) and Neil Gaiman.
  • 214 news articles worldwide in the past 12 hours.
  • Another half-million pageviews at the NeverSeconds blog (and almost 1,000 comments on her Goodbye post, up from about 150 when I posted last night).
  • The Guardian proposed that people take pictures of their lunches and tweet them #MyLunchforMartha

Also today, the Argyll and Bute Council, whose decision it was to ban Martha’s photography, relented. Back to Wired:

…[T]he leader of the Argyll and Bute Council, Roddy McCuish, [just] went on the BBC’s World At One program on Radio 4 and announced they were backing off the ban in response to a request from Scotland’s education minister along with vast pressure from social media.

Lesson: Don’t mess with a nine-year-old blogger.

Image: Martha Payne’s lunch from May 25, via NeverSeconds.

Would You Like a Side of Testicle with That

We started the day with a freaky fish, we end with a freaky meal.

Via CalorieLab (click through not recommended for the squeamish):

On Sunday, April 13, Tokyo illustrator Mao Sugiyama (who goes by the nickname “HC”), publicly seasoned and braised his own genitals on a portable gas cartridge burner, and then served them to five eager diners who each paid about $250 for the meal (a sixth was a no-show). The genitals had been returned to the asexual Sugiyama, frozen and double-bagged in plastic, following elective genital removal surgery on his 22nd birthday in early April.

After initially considering eating them himself, Sugiyama offered the meal on Twitter in mid-April to the first person willing to pay 100,000 yen (about $1,250). But after the notoriety that his tweet caused, he organized a public banquet, dubbed “Ham Cybele – Century Banquet,” at the “Asagaya Loft A” event space in the Suginami Ward of Tokyo. “Century” in Japanese is a homophone for the Japanese word for “genitals”; “Ham Cybele” refers to the Anatolian mother goddess, prefixed with an appropriate word for tough meat to create a phrase whose initials match Sugiyama’s artist name of HC…

…The five genital eaters comprised a 32-year-old male manga artist (there for “research”), a 30-year-old white-collar couple (who were “curious”), an attractive 22-year-old woman (who wondered how it would feel), and 29-year-old event planner Shigenobu Matsuzawa, who tweeted before the event, “It’s a once in a lifetime chance, so I decided on the spur of the moment to do it.”

We’re eating vegetarian this evening.

A History of Spices
Image: Detail from Turn Up The Heat: Worldwide History of Spice via Recipe-Finder.com.
H/T: Cool Infographics

A History of Spices

Image: Detail from Turn Up The Heat: Worldwide History of Spice via Recipe-Finder.com.

H/T: Cool Infographics

curiositycounts:

The New York Times R&D Lab imagines the kitchen table of the future

They sure have a lot of money to play with. Looks like they were experimenting with new business models too.  

Food labels are a tricky lot and often leave people confused.
When asked what’s wrong with them, Good Calories Bad Calories author Gary Taubes responds, “Many things. Short answer is it’s too small and too hard to read. Second, it focuses on the wrong information. The fat and sodium content of the foods are not nearly as important as the sugar and digestible carbohydrate content, at least by my research on the subject. So giving fat, total fat, sodium, etc., is misdirecting attention away from the factors that actually cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease, etc.” 
What to do? Have a design challenge.
Which is exactly what the Berkley Journalism School did when it issued a call to designers to see who could best re-imagine how labels should be done.
Via Berkley:

Rethink the Food Label is a project by the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism’s News21 program and Good Magazine. We asked the public, food thinkers, nutritionists, and designers to redesign the Nutrition Facts Label to make it easier to read and more useful to people who want to consume healthier, more nutritious and wholesome food.
Designs could incorporate the nutrition label’s existing break down of fats, sugars, vitamins, calorie counts and percent daily values. Or, they could re-imagine the label to include geography, food quality, food justice, carbon footprint, or lesser-known chemosensory characteristics.

Click through to meet the winners.

Food labels are a tricky lot and often leave people confused.

When asked what’s wrong with them, Good Calories Bad Calories author Gary Taubes responds, “Many things. Short answer is it’s too small and too hard to read. Second, it focuses on the wrong information. The fat and sodium content of the foods are not nearly as important as the sugar and digestible carbohydrate content, at least by my research on the subject. So giving fat, total fat, sodium, etc., is misdirecting attention away from the factors that actually cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease, etc.” 

What to do? Have a design challenge.

Which is exactly what the Berkley Journalism School did when it issued a call to designers to see who could best re-imagine how labels should be done.

Via Berkley:

Rethink the Food Label is a project by the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism’s News21 program and Good Magazine. We asked the public, food thinkers, nutritionists, and designers to redesign the Nutrition Facts Label to make it easier to read and more useful to people who want to consume healthier, more nutritious and wholesome food.

Designs could incorporate the nutrition label’s existing break down of fats, sugars, vitamins, calorie counts and percent daily values. Or, they could re-imagine the label to include geography, food quality, food justice, carbon footprint, or lesser-known chemosensory characteristics.

Click through to meet the winners.

                            

Food can be healthy, affordable or tasty. If you’re on a budget you get to pick two out of the three.

Via Grist:

In 2004, University of Washington obesity researcher Adam Drewnowski discovered that consumers on a fixed budget can buy a lot more calories from processed foods and soft drinks than they can from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. He found that a single dollar could purchase 1,200 calories of cookies or potato chips, but only 250 calories of carrots. One dollar could buy 875 calories of soft drink but only 170 calories of orange juice.