Posts tagged with ‘foursquare’

horaciogaray:

Facebook and Foursquare both have real-time maps of polling place check-ins across the country, broken down by state. Facebook’s map runs on autopilot: Load it up, sit and watch, almost like an iTunes visualization. Blue dots show a polling place check-in, while a counter above tallies the total check-ins. The map can also be switched into an impressive full-screen view.

FJP: The Facebook map is here and the Foursquare map is here.

horaciogaray:

Facebook and Foursquare both have real-time maps of polling place check-ins across the country, broken down by state. Facebook’s map runs on autopilot: Load it up, sit and watch, almost like an iTunes visualization. Blue dots show a polling place check-in, while a counter above tallies the total check-ins. The map can also be switched into an impressive full-screen view.

FJP: The Facebook map is here and the Foursquare map is here.

Say you’re using a restaurant search app, and you’re aware that it’s using your GPS location to help find businesses near you. You’re OK with that. But perhaps the app doesn’t also tell you that it’s using your location for another purpose: to help advertisers better create a profile of you for targeted advertising.

Christina Bonnington on How Location-Based Apps Can Stave Off the ‘Creepy Factor’

FJP: Related is our post last week on the creepy app, Girls Around Me. Foursquare since revoked access to its API and the app was removed from the app store by its developers…for now.

The Big Question: What can be done to make users feel more comfortable sharing their information, especially when secondary uses of data (that are seemingly unrelated to an app’s functionality) remain unknown.

Bonnington suggests:

Thus, transparency and user control are key to keeping an app from coming across as untrustworthy or creepy. Developers already have the tools to make sure users are aware of geolocation features in apps, and it’s incumbent on them to use them.

Mobile devices could also employ “ambient notice” features to let users know when location data is being shared. For example, when you’re using your iPhone’s compass, you can see the phone’s arrow symbol and know your device is currently using that feature. Similar signposting could be used for location services. (via Wired)


Thoughts?

Girls around our office in NYC.

These Are Girls Around Me (literally).


First answer these:

1. Is your Facebook page public?
2. Do you use Foursquare?

Then you’re probably game for search results on the app Girls Around Me, a geolocation based maps app that alerts you to girls (or guys) around you, based on your location. Using foursquare check-ins, the app finds girls in your neighborhood, and pulls their Facebook profile information for your viewing pleasure.

We tried it out and found these girls (above) around our office in NYC. It’s a little bit horrifying but a perfect example to consider the question we raised yesterday: how to decide what is public/private on Facebook and Twitter. Twitter seemed fair-game for pulling information from public tweets. But Facebook, once again, is complicated.

How many people actually bother to change their privacy settings when doing it seems so complicated?

via Cult of Mac:

Girls Around Me isn’t an app you should use to pick up girls, or guys for that matter. This is an app you should download to teach the people you care about that privacy issues are real, that social networks like Facebook and Foursquare expose you and the ones you love, and that if you do not know exactly how much you are sharing, you are as easily preyed upon as if you were naked. I can think of no better way to get a person to realize that they should understand their Facebook privacy settings then pulling out this app.

FJP: Now, if you want to make your Facebook private: Here is some help.

Photos: screenshots from the FJP’s trial run of the app.


Foursquare’s Push API to Be Released Publicly Today


Foursquare’s Push API, which the company first unvieled to developers in February, will be publicly released sometime this afternoon, according to a post on BetaBeat.
Select developers have had access to the API since the company’s last hackathon and have been using it to build applications that take advantage of the Foursquare’s push notifications. The API will go into a public beta just a few days before the company’s global hackathon on Saturday.



Chao: Data nerds rejoice!! I’m really interested to see what kinds of awesome projects come out of this.  
via Read Write Web

Foursquare’s Push API to Be Released Publicly Today

Foursquare’s Push API, which the company first unvieled to developers in February, will be publicly released sometime this afternoon, according to a post on BetaBeat.

Select developers have had access to the API since the company’s last hackathon and have been using it to build applications that take advantage of the Foursquare’s push notifications. The API will go into a public beta just a few days before the company’s global hackathon on Saturday.

Chao: Data nerds rejoice!! I’m really interested to see what kinds of awesome projects come out of this.  

via Read Write Web

Foursquare Partners with Content Farm Examiner.Com to Add News and Reviews to User Checkins

The singularity draws nearer as two of the Web’s hottest trends—location-based services and hyperlocal content, merge, with a new tieup between Foursquare and Examiner.com.

In essence, Examiner’s 68,000 contributors, known as “Examiners,” will provide reviews and recommendations on nearby venues, restaurants, events, businesses and landmarks that will surface within the Foursquare mobile app when users following Examiner.com check in. Local tips will also be added when non-followers check-in nearby.

While content farms like Examiner.com flood the Internet with keyword optimized stories of  variable quality, Foursquare has been pegged as an acquisition target for group deals sites like Groupon, which could then offer users targeted deals based on their location.

(Source: paidcontent.org)