posts about or somewhat related to ‘fox news’

Jon Stewart on (Fox) News Coverage of Ferguson
News You Like to Use?
The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism surveyed 18,000 online news consumers across ten countries on their news habits. The results are available in their 2014 Digital News Report.
Related, via Al Jazeera, American’s faith in the news is at an all time low:

The latest edition of a Gallup poll that tracks confidence in media follows a decades-long trend that shows a declining faith in television and print news. The percentage of Americans that have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in the three media formats now hover around one-fifth.
Twenty-two percent of respondents trust newspapers, 19 percent trust web-based news sites, and 18 percent say they trust TV. All three of those numbers are within the polls 4-point margin of error. 

Somewhat Related, via The New Republic: Does Fox News Cause Ignorance, or Do Ignorant Viewers Prefer Fox News?
TL;DR: Yes, but give it a read. It’s a great analysis of bandwagon effects and confirmation bias no matter your political inclinations.
Image: Most Important Types of News Among US News Consumers, via Marketing Charts and based on data from the Reuters Institute. Select to embiggen.

News You Like to Use?

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism surveyed 18,000 online news consumers across ten countries on their news habits. The results are available in their 2014 Digital News Report.

Related, via Al Jazeera, American’s faith in the news is at an all time low:

The latest edition of a Gallup poll that tracks confidence in media follows a decades-long trend that shows a declining faith in television and print news. The percentage of Americans that have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in the three media formats now hover around one-fifth.

Twenty-two percent of respondents trust newspapers, 19 percent trust web-based news sites, and 18 percent say they trust TV. All three of those numbers are within the polls 4-point margin of error. 

Somewhat Related, via The New Republic: Does Fox News Cause Ignorance, or Do Ignorant Viewers Prefer Fox News?

TL;DR: Yes, but give it a read. It’s a great analysis of bandwagon effects and confirmation bias no matter your political inclinations.

Image: Most Important Types of News Among US News Consumers, via Marketing Charts and based on data from the Reuters Institute. Select to embiggen.

A Cautionary Tale on the Use of a Photo →

Seattle Times:

Last week, The Seattle Times published a story headlined, “Women-only swim times spark emotional debate,” about a controversy over women-only hours at a pool in Tukwila. The women had requested the female-only swim times for both body-image and religious reasons.

The story was accompanied by a portrait I took of sisters Faisa Farole and Jamila Farole, who were trying to preserve female-only swim times.

This week, I learned that the Fox News network aired a story about a Minnesota swimming pool that was setting aside hours for Muslim women to swim. Fox suggested this was an example of the growing influence of Sharia law in the U.S., and included The Seattle Times photo from the Tukwila pool.

The Fox video clip, which has been shared on blogs across the country and even ran on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, began this way: “The minority becoming the majority at one community pool. Sharia Law is now changing everything…”

The Seattle Times did not authorize use of this photograph on Fox News. We are not sure how Fox News acquired this image, though it could be through a labeling mistake by The Associated Press. The Seattle Times often distributes images through the AP but with language that prevents use by television networks.

Using my photo to illustrate a story on a swimming program in Minnesota, under the title “Sharia Law: Swim Class for Somali Muslim Girls,” is unfair to the young women in the photo and misleads viewers.

How Much Do You Know about the News?
The Nation recently sent out a Fox or Fiction News Quiz that asks viewers to guess which of a series of headlines are real Fox News headlines. The larger point is to establish themselves as a necessary force against what they see as ludicrous reporting from Fox and get people to support The Nation.
But setting that point aside, sometimes news quizzes are fun. And useful. Wading through continuous streams of information all day make weeks hard to separate sometimes. In the spirit of literacy and fun, Slate offers a weekly news quiz with Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings. The NY Times has a 5 question daily based on a given day’s paper. And, if you want to see how you compare to the rest of the nation by age, gender and education, take the Pew Research Center’s News IQ Quiz. 
Got any news quizzes you particularly like? Let us know. —Jihii
Image: A Fox headline from The Nation’s Fox or Fiction New Quiz. (Sorry, it’s an answer spoiler for one of the questions.)

How Much Do You Know about the News?

The Nation recently sent out a Fox or Fiction News Quiz that asks viewers to guess which of a series of headlines are real Fox News headlines. The larger point is to establish themselves as a necessary force against what they see as ludicrous reporting from Fox and get people to support The Nation.

But setting that point aside, sometimes news quizzes are fun. And useful. Wading through continuous streams of information all day make weeks hard to separate sometimes. In the spirit of literacy and fun, Slate offers a weekly news quiz with Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings. The NY Times has a 5 question daily based on a given day’s paper. And, if you want to see how you compare to the rest of the nation by age, gender and education, take the Pew Research Center’s News IQ Quiz

Got any news quizzes you particularly like? Let us know. —Jihii

Image: A Fox headline from The Nation’s Fox or Fiction New Quiz. (Sorry, it’s an answer spoiler for one of the questions.)

Colbert Report Creates a Bot to #PraiseFOX

Watch the above for the details and then head to @RealHumanPraise for the shenanigans.

Amazing," said Cavuto, when it was all over. "It’s in there. It’s worth a read.

In which Fox News asks the question on everyone’s mind: Would a war in Syria match the Biblical description of the End Times?

What I’m curious about is this: How many people in the U.S. are actually excited about the prospect of the End Times and are therefore hoping for a military intervention in Syria because they believe we’re on the cusp of fulfiling a biblical prophecy regarding the end of the world?

Like, who is Fox News appealing to here?

Can we do a survey about that?

(via kohenari)

FJP: You got me curious so I did what I often do when I’m curious and hit up Google.

Christian News Wire reports that “41% of all U.S. adults, 54% of Protestants and 77% of Evangelicals believe the world is now living in the biblical end times.” The findings are from a recent poll conducted by the Barna Group, a faith and culture polling firm.

Kind of incredible, no? Even James F. Fitzgerald, author of a book arguing that the End Times have already begun, is surprised. And he commissioned the poll.

"I thought the numbers could possibly be as low as 10% for the overall population and maybe 30% for Christians in general, or less," Fitzgerald tells CNW. "I had no way to know before the survey. But the response of the overall population was higher than what I expected from Christians, and the Evangelical’s response was nearly twice what I thought."

Last December, National Catholic Reporter reported that more than a third of Americans believed extreme weather is the sign of End Times. The story, based on a poll conducted by Public Religion Research Institute, found that “[t]he conviction is particularly strong among white evangelical Protestants (65 percent), and less common among Catholics (21 percent) and the religiously unaffiliated (15 percent). Overall, 36 percent of Americans see signs of the end times in Mother Nature’s fury.”

A 2010 Pew Research Poll found that “41% of Americans believe that Jesus Christ definitely (23%) or probably (18%) will have returned to earth” by 2050.

And if you go back all that way back to 1999, Newsweek ran a cover story called “Prophecy: What the Bible Says About the End of the World.” In it, the magazine reported that “forty percent of all Americans and 45 percent of Christians believe that the world will end, as the Bible predicts, in a battle at Armageddon between Jesus and the Antichrist.”

So, who is Fox News appealing to here? A very generous slice of the American people. — Michael

(Source: motherjones, via kohenari)

We continue to find that Democrats trust most TV news sources other than Fox, while Republicans don’t trust anything except Fox. News preferences are very polarizing along party lines.

Dean Debnam, President of Public Policy Polling, in a press release on a new poll released on American trust in its broadcast news stations. Fox News’ Credibility Declines (PDF).

The News: Americans don’t trust broadcast news sources. Matter of fact, more people distrust NBC, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News and Comedy Central than trust them.

However, Fox News is the news org that Americans are most skeptical about. According to the PPP poll, 46% of voters distrust it while 41% trust it.

The only news org that a majority does trust? PBS, with 52% of voters saying they trust it and 29% saying they don’t.

This network is not going there.

David Clark, Fox News Executive Producer, in a note to weekend producers.

Via New York Magazine:

According to sources, David Clark, the executive producer in charge of Fox’s weekend coverage, gave producers instructions not to talk about gun-control policy on air… The directive created a rift inside the network. According to a source, one political panelist e-mailed Clark that [New York Mayor Michael] Bloomberg was booked on Meet the Press to talk about gun control. Clark responded, “We haven’t buried the children yet, we’re not discussing it.” During the weekend, one frustrated producer went around Clark to lobby Michael Clemente, Fox’s executive vice-president for news editorial, but Clemente upheld the mandate. “We were expressly forbidden from discussing gun control,” the source said. Clark’s edict wasn’t universal: On Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace talked with Democratic Senators Joe Lieberman and Dick Durbin about gun control, and later in the program, panelists Bill Kristol and Fortune editor Nina Easton weighed in on the issue.

Certainly Fox’s decision to avoid widespread policy talk could be seen as an editorial impulse to keep the focus trained on the tragedy’s human dimension. But Fox’s coverage also highlights the growing chasm between Rupert Murdoch and Ailes. Gun culture is alive and well at Fox News. Roger Ailes and Sean Hannity are reportedly licensed to carry concealed handguns in New York City. Fox personality Eric Bolling is a vocal Second Amendment proponent on air. “Not only do they carry guns, they don’t allow an honest debate on TV,” a Fox News insider said. In the past, when Ailes has clashed with Murdoch on politics, Fox News’s outsize profits have helped Ailes prevail. Earlier this fall, Ailes signed a new four-year contract, and he retains complete editorial control over the network.

New York Magazine, Rupert Murdoch Wants Stricter Gun Laws After Newtown, But Fox News Doesn’t Get the Memo.

This Year’s War on Christmas

It’s begun. By “it’s” we mean Fox News’ annual coverage of it.

Via Talking Points Memo.

Fox News Contributor Isn't Disclosed As A Member Of Romney's Campaign | Media Matters for America →

Fox News contributor Elaine Chao has recently appeared on Fox Business to criticize Obama over the economy and push the falsehood that he stripped the work requirement from welfare. During these appearances, Fox didn’t disclose that Chao is a national chair of Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign. Fox News has made it a regular practice to not disclose some of its frequent guests’ ties to the Romney campaign.

In an August 2 press release announcing her appointment, Chao stated that she is “honored that Governor Mitt Romney asked me to serve as the national chair of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders for Romney” and that “it will take new leadership to put this country on a path to prosperity and full employment.”

News Corp., the parent company of Fox News, recently nominated Chao to join its Board of Directors. Chao is married to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Fox News contributors John Bolton and Walid Phares, and Fox regular Jay Sekulow, have all appeared on the network to criticize Obama without disclosing they’re Romney advisers. Fox News contributor Pete Snyder is the chairman of the Republican Party of Virginia’s 2012 coordinated committee. And Fox News contributor Karl Rove is the co-founder and adviser for the super PAC American Crossroads, which is spending tens of millions of dollars to defeat Democrats.

FJP: For example, in an appearance with Fox Business host Lou Dobbs, Chao was identified as “the former Secretary of Labor under President George W. Bush, now a distinguished a fellow at the Heritage Foundation, Fox News contributor.”

(Source: sarahlee310)

Fox’s Graphics Department Continues with its Very Bad Week

Fox’s Graphics Department Continues with its Very Bad Week

By any normal standards, Obama should be extremely vulnerable. Not only is the economy in bad shape, he has proved to be a much more hesitant, less commanding White House presence than his supporters longed for. And yet, most surveys put him comfortably ahead of his would-be rivals. That’s not a positive judgment on the president – whose approval rating stands at a meagre 44% – but an indictment of the dire quality of a Republican field almost comically packed with the scandal-plagued, gaffe-prone and downright flaky. And the finger of blame for this state of affairs points squarely at the studios of Fox News.

Jonathan Freedland, The Guardian. How Fox News is helping Barack Obama’s re-election bid.

I honestly didn’t know the laws of the universe allowed letters to be physically arranged in the order of this headline. — Michael

Fox’s Graphics Department is Having a Very Bad Week

And it’s only Wednesday.

The unemployment graph where 8.6 is magically greater than 8.8 or 8.9 floated through the Tumblr on Monday (the horizontal lines have been added to the original Fox graphic).

Now it’s on to geography. Let’s admire how New Hampshire replaces Vermont and Utah is now Nevada.

Images via Media Matters.

I hired Sarah Palin because she was hot and got ratings.

Roger Ailes, president of Fox News Channel

HuffPo

(via brooklynmutt)

(via brooklynmutt)