Posts tagged gaza

World Press Photo of the Year 2012 contest winners
newsflick:

Paul Hansen of Sweden, a photographer working for the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter, has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 with this picture of a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City taken on November 20, 2012. Jury member Mayu Mohanna said about the photo: The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.

Picture: REUTERS/Paul Hansen/Dagens Nyheter/World Press Photo

World Press Photo of the Year 2012 contest winners

newsflick:

Paul Hansen of Sweden, a photographer working for the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter, has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 with this picture of a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City taken on November 20, 2012. Jury member Mayu Mohanna said about the photo: The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.

Picture: REUTERS/Paul Hansen/Dagens Nyheter/World Press Photo

Instagramming Propaganda and the Speed of Experiencing War

One, via Michael Shaw:

[W]elcome to a media space in which we are consuming hostility and processing raw data and raw propaganda almost as quickly as the war correspondent, the fighter pilot, the governments, the diplomats and the antagonists themselves.

Two, via John Edwin Mason:

There’s always been more to war than bombs and bullets. Words and images are weapons, too. They’re the raw material of the propaganda that’s designed to strengthen friends and undermine enemies.

Propaganda has been a part of every war that history knows anything about, and creating and disseminating it has largely been the job of professionals — war doctors, priests, reporters, photographers, politicians, bureaucrats.

Social media and smart phones have let amateurs in on the action.

Three, via Stephen Mayes:

On trust and credibility, it is key to educate ourselves about what we are looking at. I triangulate. I read a bit of information here and there I try to find it elsewhere to validate it. As we saw with Syria, you can fall into a trap. You can read information on 10 blogs but it is all coming from one source. Unless you really dig, it is hard to validate. In the main I think we are all learning that right degree of belief and skepticism in how we treat text and image online. We may be fooled, we may make stupid decisions but we are educating ourselves about what to trust and what not to trust.

It’s not something you can teach.

Images: Selected images from Instagram gathered by searching Israel and Gaza hashtags by John Edwin Mason. Select to embiggen.

NBC News correspondent Ayman Mohyeldin said it’s a “completely different dynamic” reporting from Gaza now than it was four years ago, given both the unrestricted access for journalists and widespread use of social media.

In late 2008, Mohyeldin was based in Gaza City, when the Israel Defense Forces launched a three-week aerial bombardment and ground invasion that killed 1,400 Palestinians. At the time, the Israeli military restricted foreign journalists from entering Gaza, leaving Mohyeldin and his Al Jazeera English colleague Sherine Tadros to cover the war with little competition.

While the pair received high marks at the time for their coverage, Mohyeldin, speaking by phone Monday from Gaza City, said “there was a dearth of information and pictures” as a result of so few journalists on the ground. “We couldn’t be everywhere at the same time,” he said.

Four years later, that’s not the case. News organizations have flooded Gaza over the past six days of a conflict that has killed 104 Palestinians and three Israelis, along with wounding 860 Palestinians and 68 Israelis, according to CNN.

“I think it’s a testament to how important journalism still is in having real journalists on the ground in Gaza,” Mohyeldin said.

Widespread social media use is the other significant change in Gaza coverage from winter 2008-2009, with citizens uploading their own videos and journalists engaging over Twitter, Reddit and Google+.

In covering the war in Syria, news organizations have often relied on raw footage from areas where no journalists were present. It’s a different situation now in Gaza, where numerous journalists are reporting each major strike throughout the day in real time on Twitter, often adding context and details as soon as they are available.

Take Monday’s strike on a media center in Gaza City, an event quickly covered on Twitter.

BBC Middle East bureau chief Paul Danahar tweeted around 8:30 a.m. EST that Israel struck a building used by some outlets. “I’m standing in front of it,” Danahar tweeted. “It’s on fire. Smoke billowing out.”

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again
One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.
He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again

One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.

He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.

Israel Warns Media On Gaza Flotilla

Say you cover the Middle East and want to get a first hand look at the Gaza-bound flotilla activists are scheduled to sail in the upcoming days. Israel suggests you shouldn’t go, or it might prevent you from entering the country for the next 10 years.

Via Al Jazeera

Israel has warned journalists that they could be banned from entering the country for 10 years if they travel aboard an aid flotilla scheduled to set sail for the Gaza Strip.

The Israeli government issued the warning on Sunday, saying the journalists could also have their equipment seized in addition to other sanctions.

The threat came as pro-Palestinian activists prepared to set sail for Gaza from Greece and elsewhere in an effort to break Israel’s blockade of the coastal territory.

Eleven ships - nine passenger boats and two cargo ships - carrying about 1,000 activists from 20 countries are said to be taking part in the second Freedom Flotilla.

Among the activists are many Israelis, including Amira Hass, a prominent journalist of the Israeli newspaper Haaretz.