posts about or somewhat related to ‘gigaom’

A man, a cocktail party, and a public twitter display
GigaOM tech writer Ryan Kim waits for his tweet to appear on a live feed at the paidContent 2012 cocktail party. Self-reflection impending. On twitter displays, Narcissism directly correlates with the ratio of humor, tagging, and retweets.
FJP: Conferences are such fun things.

A man, a cocktail party, and a public twitter display

GigaOM tech writer Ryan Kim waits for his tweet to appear on a live feed at the paidContent 2012 cocktail party. Self-reflection impending. On twitter displays, Narcissism directly correlates with the ratio of humor, tagging, and retweets.

FJP: Conferences are such fun things.

GigaOm/paidContent Conference Now Streaming Live →

We’re at the GigaOm/paidContent 2012 event in New York City today. If you’d like to watch the Webcast you can do so here.

Today’s conference is about both experiments and results. As paidContent’s Staci Kramer writes:

Last night, a longtime paidContent reader asked me about the theme of our flagship conference this year. “At the Crossroads,” I said. “Like every year,” he quickly replied. Well, yes and no. Yes, this digital CEO is in a business that perpetually seems like it’s at a crossroads. Here’s what’s different: paidContent 2010 was about experiments; paidContent 2011 was about results. Today’s paidContent 2012 is about both; for instance, we’re well past apps as an experiment and we’re seeing sustained results. We’re starting new experiments, new cycles. But we’re also at a point where companies large and small, legacy and always digital, have to stop looking across the road at a distant future and make hard decisions now.

If you’d like to see the tools we use to Webcast, here’s a writeup I posted last week.

The NYT doesn’t have a paywall; it’s a line of sandbags

Will the paywall result in a single new reader coming to the New York Times? That seems unlikely at best. While it’s not impossible that someone might suddenly decide to pay for the paper despite not being a regular reader, it seems more likely that the people currently paying are die-hard NYT fans. And that’s great — although the comparison Salmon makes to a museum might cut a little close to home — but it’s hardly a forward-facing digital strategy, as I’ve argued in the past (and others have argued as well).

Read the whole article at GigaOm

Join the discussion, let us know what you think about the NYT paywall or just paywalls in general!  


What does journalism of the future look like? 
…

Filloux’s blog post, entitled “Jazz Is Not a Byproduct of Rap Music,” is a response to something Jarvis wrote several weeks ago, in which the author and New York University City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism professor argued that the news article — the central unit of storytelling that we have become familiar with in newspapers and other forms of media — should no longer be the default for every news event. In many cases, Jarvis said, the article or story should be seen as a “value-added luxury or byproduct” of the process of news-gathering, rather than the central goal in every situation.
Via GigaOm 

What does journalism of the future look like? 

Filloux’s blog post, entitled “Jazz Is Not a Byproduct of Rap Music,” is a response to something Jarvis wrote several weeks ago, in which the author and New York University City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism professor argued that the news article — the central unit of storytelling that we have become familiar with in newspapers and other forms of media — should no longer be the default for every news event. In many cases, Jarvis said, the article or story should be seen as a “value-added luxury or byproduct” of the process of news-gathering, rather than the central goal in every situation.

Via GigaOm 

With Kickstarter, people are preordering your idea. Sure, they’re buying something tangible — a CD, a movie, a book, etc — but more than that, they’re pledging money because they believe in you, the creator. If you take the time to extrapolate beyond the obvious low-hanging goals, you can use this money to push the idea — the project — somewhere farther reaching than initially envisaged. And all without giving up any ownership of the idea. This — micro-seed capital without relinquishment of ownership — is where the latent potential of Kickstarter funding lies.

— Author and publisher Craig Mod, who raised $24,000 for a book project Art/Space Tokyo through Kickstarter. Om Malik says of Kickstarter that it’s less of technology site, and more of a socio-cultural revolution, which is changing the very notion of commerce. Via GigaOm

(Source: craigmod.com)

When Arianna Huffington started the Post in 2005, she was known for very little other than her marriage to Republican congressman Michael Huffington, some political aspirations, and her web of social connections to a wide variety of people in the media, politics and business communities. When she started the website, as media consultant Jeff Jarvis noted in a blog post, it was widely ridiculed as a lightweight plaything for a rich socialite. It certainly didn’t look like much, and the content that appeared there — a strange and eclectic mix of commentary from film-makers, actors, bureaucrats and left-leaning intellectuals — didn’t appear to be much of a competitor for anything, let alone an established and dominant media player like the New York Times.

But thanks to some funding from Softbank and Greycroft Partners, and the web savvy of people like Jonah Peretti and CTO Paul Berry, The Huffington Post just kept growing and growing, and made use of all the social tools at its disposal, from comments and Twitter to Facebook’s social graph plugins. As more prominent writers started to post their thoughts on the site, that attracted others — even though the network didn’t pay any of them anything, something that has been a source of much controversy. But as some have pointed out, The Huffington Post didn’t have to pay anyone; thousands of people have been more than happy to write for nothing, the same kind of phenomenon that has helped other sites like Talking Points Memo grow from single blogs into new-media powerhouses.

— GigaOm’s Mattew Ingram on why a newspaper didn’t start—or couldn’t—start an operation like the Huffington Post, in spite of their experience in publishing, and deep pockets. Ingram posits that Huffington had nothing to lose if she failed, which she clearly did not do. 

(Source: gigaom.com)