Posts tagged global voices

Gender Balance in News
Open Gender Tracking Project is a software program that collects digital content from news sources and analyzes gender balance within news organizations. The project was created by Irene Ros and Adam Hyland of Bocoup and Nathan Matias of the MIT Center for Civic Media. 
The program collects data on who is writing the articles and who the articles are written about. It also measures audience response data directly associated with specific articles (like how many times a post is shared in social media). The goal of the program is to make news sources aware of content diversity (or lack thereof) so organizations can work toward maintaining a balanced set of voices. 
For the most part, women are currently being underrepresented in digital media. 
Via Guardian:

In the UK, newspaper front pages rarely include women, and women write a minority of articles. Women are prominent at the Daily Mail, where they write most of the celebrity news, fewer news articles, and almost no sport. Even when publications do include women, they’re often at the mercy of their audiences. 20% of Telegraph opinion articles are written by women, but women’s opinion articles attract only 14% of the Telegraph’s shares and likes on social media.

And according to studies done by the Women’s Media Center, in both legacy and newer news sites, women are too often relegated to writing about “pink topics” like fashion, relationships, and food, rather than urgent and/or international issues.
On a positive note, Global Voices, an international citizen media news site, is one of the only news organizations currently known to have equal gender participation. According to The Guardian, 764 women wrote 51% of all articles from 2005-2012. 
Related: Gender balance is the new rage. I just wish somebody had spread the word to the Wikiverse: Wikipedia Bumps Women From ‘American Novelists’ Category. - Krissy
Image: Screenshot of graph from Open Gender Tracker

Gender Balance in News

Open Gender Tracking Project is a software program that collects digital content from news sources and analyzes gender balance within news organizations. The project was created by Irene Ros and Adam Hyland of Bocoup and Nathan Matias of the MIT Center for Civic Media

The program collects data on who is writing the articles and who the articles are written about. It also measures audience response data directly associated with specific articles (like how many times a post is shared in social media). The goal of the program is to make news sources aware of content diversity (or lack thereof) so organizations can work toward maintaining a balanced set of voices.

For the most part, women are currently being underrepresented in digital media. 

Via Guardian:

In the UK, newspaper front pages rarely include women, and women write a minority of articles. Women are prominent at the Daily Mail, where they write most of the celebrity news, fewer news articles, and almost no sport. Even when publications do include women, they’re often at the mercy of their audiences. 20% of Telegraph opinion articles are written by women, but women’s opinion articles attract only 14% of the Telegraph’s shares and likes on social media.

And according to studies done by the Women’s Media Center, in both legacy and newer news sites, women are too often relegated to writing about “pink topics” like fashion, relationships, and food, rather than urgent and/or international issues.

On a positive note, Global Voices, an international citizen media news site, is one of the only news organizations currently known to have equal gender participation. According to The Guardian, 764 women wrote 51% of all articles from 2005-2012. 

Related: Gender balance is the new rage. I just wish somebody had spread the word to the Wikiverse: Wikipedia Bumps Women From ‘American Novelists’ Category. - Krissy

Image: Screenshot of graph from Open Gender Tracker

In 1912, radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi declared, “The coming of the wireless era will make war impossible, because it will make war ridiculous.” Two years later a ridiculous war began, ultimately killing nine million Europeans.

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT, and co-founder of Global Voices, in this fantastic piece on our disconnection in our connected age. 

via Wilson Quarterly:

As we enter an age of increased global connection, we are also entering an age of increasing participation. The billions of people worldwide who access the Internet via computers and mobile phones have access to information far beyond their borders, and the opportunity to contribute their own insights and opinions. It should be no surprise that we are experiencing a concomitant rise in mystery that parallels the increases in connection.

Zuckerman takes us from the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran to the ongoing Arab Spring, and the different tools of communication that helped us navigate (and get lost or miss) it all.

Some highlights:

A central paradox of this connected age is that while it’s easier than ever to share information and perspectives from different parts of the world, we may be encountering a narrower picture of the world than we did in less connected days.

Why worry about what’s covered in newspapers and television when it’s possible to read firsthand accounts from Syria or Sierra Leone? Research suggests that we rarely read such accounts. My studies of online news consumption show that 95 percent of the news consumed by American Internet users is published in the United States.

Increased connection doesn’t necessary lead to increased understanding, he says. But at the same time, “there’s never been a tool as powerful as the Internet for building new ties (and maintaining existing ones) across distant borders.”

FJP: Worth noticing: the reader comments. One laughs at the notion of a “serendipity engine” (which is the beside the point entirely) and another says that “our ability to find and disseminate information has surpassed our ability to understand.” That’s worth thinking about.

Zuckerman encourages us to “see broadly,” which isn’t a new idea. A well-known danger of the build-it-yourself media diet is that we tend to fill it with things we know we want to know about, and miss the things that might do us some good. So sure, developers can race to build tools that will help us discover the people and issues in hidden corners of the world, and we can keep at improving our consumption diets.

But a vital prerequisite to any such consumption modification is for us to acquire a mental disposition that requires a bit of practice. Perhaps Zuckerman’s most important point:

The challenge for anyone who wants to decipher the mysteries of a connected age is to understand how the Internet does, and does not, connect us. Only then can we find ways to make online connection more common and more powerful.

Outside the media world, who really thinks about that question? It’s worth asking, just to open discussion, and might give us a clue about how to understand all the stuff we’re so good at consuming and disseminating. To achieve success in any endeavor, we generally identify our intent first. So why not the same of the internet?

Here’s the PDF of his article. Print it out, put it in your pocket, put it on your ipad and re-read it a few times. Talk to people about it. We’ll keep thinking about it too.—Jihii

P.S.: Global Voices on Tumblr.

Threatened Voices: Tracking suppression of online free speech
The Electronic Frontier Foundation announced today that they are collaborating with Global Voices’ “Threatened Voices” project “to help shed light on the threats faced by netizens around the world.”
Via EFF:

Less than six weeks into the year, EFF has already documented nine cases of bloggers under fire: in Oman and South Korea;  Bahrain and China; Thailand; Iran; Vietnam; and Ethiopia.  And just this week, two more Iranian bloggers were arrested, a Saudi citizen was forced to flee his country after receiving death threats for content he’d posted on Twitter, and both an Indonesian and a Moroccan were detained for posts made on Facebook.  These additional cases mean that so far in 2012, fourteen netizens have been threatened for content posted online…and those are just the ones we know about.

Image: Screenshot from the Threatened Voices project. Users can sort by time and region, and view details about the circumstances surrounding the arrest or threat of listed bloggers.
The site was created with Drupal with a Google Map powered by TimeMap and Google MapIconMaker libraries. Information about individuals is created by the Global Voices community along with a Yahoo Pipes feed that surveys sources such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Wikipedia, Reporters without Borders and more.

Threatened Voices: Tracking suppression of online free speech

The Electronic Frontier Foundation announced today that they are collaborating with Global Voices’ “Threatened Voices” project “to help shed light on the threats faced by netizens around the world.”

Via EFF:

Less than six weeks into the year, EFF has already documented nine cases of bloggers under fire: in Oman and South Korea; Bahrain and China; Thailand; Iran; Vietnam; and Ethiopia. And just this week, two more Iranian bloggers were arrested, a Saudi citizen was forced to flee his country after receiving death threats for content he’d posted on Twitter, and both an Indonesian and a Moroccan were detained for posts made on Facebook. These additional cases mean that so far in 2012, fourteen netizens have been threatened for content posted online…and those are just the ones we know about.

Image: Screenshot from the Threatened Voices project. Users can sort by time and region, and view details about the circumstances surrounding the arrest or threat of listed bloggers.

The site was created with Drupal with a Google Map powered by TimeMap and Google MapIconMaker libraries. Information about individuals is created by the Global Voices community along with a Yahoo Pipes feed that surveys sources such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Wikipedia, Reporters without Borders and more.

globalvoices:

Threatened Voices is a collaborative mapping project to build a database of bloggers who have been threatened, arrested or killed for speaking out online and to draw attention to the campaigns to free them.

globalvoices:

Threatened Voices is a collaborative mapping project to build a database of bloggers who have been threatened, arrested or killed for speaking out online and to draw attention to the campaigns to free them.

When Rebecca MacKinnon and I started Global Voices in 2004… we believed that the rise of citizen media meant that many more voices could become part of the media dialog, and that international news outlets would look to the people directly affected by events for their accounts and perspectives. That’s proven true – for the past month, our newsroom has been flooded with requests from media outlets around the world to unpack and comment on the events in Tunisia, and especially those in Egypt.

Where Global Voices has been vastly less successful is in achieving another of our goals: shifting the global media agenda to be more globally inclusive. In other words, we’re very good at getting attention to different commentators and observers of events that major media outlets have decided to pay attention to. But we’ve had little to no luck shifting attention to stories that fail to register on the media’s radar screen, even when we’re able to provide on-the-ground commentary and eyewitness accounts.

New media technologies – not just online media, but satellite television, which has been critically important in covering (and perhaps inspiring) protests in Egypt and Tunisia – offer the promise of covering breaking events in much greater depth than in a broadcast world. I’m very grateful for Al Jazeera English’s thorough, ongoing coverage of events in Egypt, and for my friend Andy Carvin’s relentless curation of Twitter, following protests in Tunisia and Egypt. But I worry that these technologies aren’t broadening the set of stories covered internationally – in many cases, we seem to be covering a narrower range of stories than in years past, though in far greater depth.
Ethan Zuckerman, Co-founder, Global Voices,Tunisia, Egypt, Gabon? Our responsibility to witness.