posts about or somewhat related to ‘graphic design’

A Day In The Life Of A Graphic Designer by Megan Patrick via blog.howdesign.com

A Day In The Life Of A Graphic Designer by Megan Patrick via blog.howdesign.com

The internet, at this time in history, is the greatest client assignment of all time. The Western world is porting itself over to the web in mind and deed and is looking to make itself comfortable and productive. It’s every person in the world, connected to every other person in the world, and no one fully understands how to make best use of this new reality because no one has seen anything like it before. The internet wants to hire you to build stuff for it because its trying to figure out what it can do. It’s offering you a blank check and asking you to come up with something fascinating and useful that it can embrace en masse, to the benefit of everyone.

— Ben Pieratt is a graphic designer who runs of SVPPLY, a curated community of stunning products and designed objects. Read the whole post, or follow him on Tumblr

(Source: swiss-miss.com)

If your infographic makes sense when you look at it for 5 seconds, but is still teaching you things after you have looked at it for a full minute, then you know it is good.
Economist Covers: 1964-1968.
Via Newmanology:

The Economist has always been known for its graphic and provocative covers. Over the past decade they’ve made a name for their weekly visual political jibes. In the 60s, The Economist used bold black and white photography, simple bold typography, and just red and black ink to create tough, poster-like covers. If I was art directing a weekly magazine today, this is what I would like it to look like: simple, immediate, engaging, and provocative. Thanks to Coverbrowser.com for the scans. You can see the complete collection of The Economist covers from 1843-2003 at the site.

Economist Covers: 1964-1968.

Via Newmanology:

The Economist has always been known for its graphic and provocative covers. Over the past decade they’ve made a name for their weekly visual political jibes. In the 60s, The Economist used bold black and white photography, simple bold typography, and just red and black ink to create tough, poster-like covers. If I was art directing a weekly magazine today, this is what I would like it to look like: simple, immediate, engaging, and provocative. Thanks to Coverbrowser.com for the scans. You can see the complete collection of The Economist covers from 1843-2003 at the site.

I was just offered money to post an infographic. Seriously, people. It’s a BLOG. Let’s keep some perspective, shall we? Put that money towards hiring a graphic designer or statistician. If you have a product you want promoted, buy an ad.

Dustin Smith, Chart Porn, A Bribe?.

FJP: Nicely done, and a good example for the ethics section of Blogging 101.


Infographics For Web Designers: Information You Ought To Know

Infographics For Web Designers: Information You Ought To Know

Get to know a Logo
Web standards body W3C released its HTML5 logo.

It stands strong and true, resilient and universal as the markup you write. It shines as bright and as bold as the forward-thinking, dedicated web developers you are. It’s the standard’s standard, a pennant for progress. And it certainly doesn’t use tables for layout.

We present an HTML5 logo.

Get to know a Logo

Web standards body W3C released its HTML5 logo.

It stands strong and true, resilient and universal as the markup you write. It shines as bright and as bold as the forward-thinking, dedicated web developers you are. It’s the standard’s standard, a pennant for progress. And it certainly doesn’t use tables for layout.

We present an HTML5 logo.

The control which designers know in the print medium, and often desire in the web medium, is simply a function of the limitation of the printed page. We should embrace the fact that the web doesn’t have the same constraints, and design for this flexibility. But first, we must “accept the ebb and flow of things.”

— John Allsopp, A Dao of Web Design.