posts about or somewhat related to ‘graphic novels’

Before anyone can even pose the j-school essay question of whether comics can be journalism, Joe Sacco has your answer. — Slate, Why cartoonist Joe Sacco is one of the best war correspondents in the world.
Don’t know Joe Sacco or his work? His books, such as Palestine about his experiences on the West Bank, and Safe Area Goražde about the Bosnian War, have reimagined what comics and journalism can be.
Here’s a good profile from the Guardian, and here’s a Daily Beast article by Sacco and Chris Hedges about Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, their recent collaboration on the effects of coal mining in West Virginia.
Sacco’s new book, Journalism is now available from Metropolitan Books and contains a collection of his short form reportage from around the world.
Select image to embiggen.

Before anyone can even pose the j-school essay question of whether comics can be journalism, Joe Sacco has your answer. — Slate, Why cartoonist Joe Sacco is one of the best war correspondents in the world.

Don’t know Joe Sacco or his work? His books, such as Palestine about his experiences on the West Bank, and Safe Area Goražde about the Bosnian War, have reimagined what comics and journalism can be.

Here’s a good profile from the Guardian, and here’s a Daily Beast article by Sacco and Chris Hedges about Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, their recent collaboration on the effects of coal mining in West Virginia.

Sacco’s new book, Journalism is now available from Metropolitan Books and contains a collection of his short form reportage from around the world.

Select image to embiggen.

MetaMaus

Twenty-five years ago Art Spiegelman brought the graphic novel to the general public and radicalized the type of stories the medium could tell.

In his Pulitzer Prize winning Maus, he tells the story of both Holocaust survivors and second generation survivors that then survived them, all in a world where Jews were mice, Germans were cats and Poles were pigs.

For the 25th anniversary, Spiegelman is releasing MetaMaus, a collection of interviews, scrapbooks and even a DVD about the original work’s creation.

Via the New York Times:

…The success of “Maus” — the first of its two volumes appeared in 1986 — was far from preordained. The book was turned down by many publishers, and Mr. Spiegelman prints his rejection letters here, from nearly all of America’s major publishing houses, including Alfred A. Knopf and Farrar, Straus & Giroux.

The idea of a comic book about the Holocaust was inconceivable to most. The idea made people snort. One editor wrote: “You can imagine the response I’ve gotten from the sales department.” “Maus” was finally published by Pantheon Books, which gave its author only a small advance.

And if you haven’t read Maus, we recommend stopping just about everything you might be doing and go and give it a read.