posts about or somewhat related to ‘graphics’

Mapping Ebola

Via The New York Times:

Patient Zero in the Ebola outbreak, researchers suspect, was a 2-year-old boy who died on Dec. 6, just a few days after falling ill in a village in Guéckédou, in southeastern Guinea. Bordering Sierra Leone and Liberia, Guéckédou is at the intersection of three nations, where the disease found an easy entry point to the region.

A week later, it killed the boy’s mother, then his 3-year-old sister, then his grandmother. All had fever, vomiting and diarrhea, but no one knew what had sickened them.

Two mourners at the grandmother’s funeral took the virus home to their village. A health worker carried it to still another, where he died, as did his doctor. They both infected relatives from other towns. By the time Ebola was recognized, in March, dozens of people had died in eight Guinean communities, and suspected cases were popping up in Liberia and Sierra Leone…

…Now, with 1,779 cases, including 961 deaths and a small cluster in Nigeria, the outbreak is out of control and still getting worse. Not only is it the largest ever, but it also seems likely to surpass all two dozen previous known Ebola outbreaks combined.

Images: What You Need to Know About the Ebola Oubreak, via The New York Times. Select to embiggen.

Artist Creates Light-Hearted Comics For Heavy-Hearted Creatives
Grant Snider, student of orthodontics and artist extraordinaire, creates a series of light-hearted, inspirational comics about art, writing, and life on his website, Incidental Comics. The comics cover topics from rules for freelancers to drug induced writing enhancement. Fun for all.
Image: How To Make Write by Grant Snider

Artist Creates Light-Hearted Comics For Heavy-Hearted Creatives

Grant Snider, student of orthodontics and artist extraordinaire, creates a series of light-hearted, inspirational comics about art, writing, and life on his website, Incidental Comics. The comics cover topics from rules for freelancers to drug induced writing enhancement. Fun for all.

Image: How To Make Write by Grant Snider

As we started to collect our ideas for the structure of the project, the multimedia group agreed that we didn’t want to create a bunch of different overlapping pieces and hang them all off the text. We wanted to make a single story out of all the assets, including the text. So the larger project wasn’t a typical design effort. It was an editing project that required us to weave things together so that text, video, photography and graphics could all be consumed in a way that was similar to reading—a different kind of reading.

Steve Duenes, NY Times Graphics Director in the Q&A: How We Made Snow Fall (via Source)

Last month, the NY Times created a beautifully compelling story on avalanches and skiing in Washington State. This morning, we get to read about exactly how they did it. Most fascinating is their discussion of how to pace the story so it would feel like a seamless reading experience:

Q. There’s a ton of audio and moving-image work in Snow Fall, and you used a lot of techniques from filmmaking, but within a very reading-centric experience. What kind of challenges did those elements present?

Catherine Spangler, Video Journalist: The challenges of crafting multimedia to compliment a text-based story were the same challenges faced in any storytelling endeavor. We focused on the pacing, narrative tension and story arc—all while ensuring that each element gave the user a different experience of the story. The moving images provided a much-needed pause at critical moments in the text, adding a subtle atmospheric quality. The team often asked whether a video or piece of audio was adding value to the project, and we edited elements out that felt duplicative. Having a tight edit that slowly built the tension of the narrative was the overall goal.

Graham Roberts, Graphics Editor: With the visuals, especially ones that would actually interrupt the reading, we wanted it to feel like a natural continuation. This required choosing appropriate color palettes, and the right kind of fluid movements. The reader would hopefully feel that they were reading into the graphic, and not see it as a distraction. Content wise, these elements needed to occur in passages that were challenging to express with words alone, like the layout of the terrain, and the shape, speed and duration of the avalanche itself. Or something that was very hard to follow without a visual aid, like the trajectory and timing of each skier’s path down the mountain.

When Television Graphics Go Bad
"We are mortified this appeared during our 5 pm news broadcast," said Jeff Harris, KMGH-TV News Director. “The editor pulled the image of the book cover from the Internet without realizing it had been doctored.  We sincerely regret the error and have corrected the story to avoid any recurrence of its broadcast. We are following up internally as well to avoid a repeat of this inexcusable oversight.”
FJP: Yes, beware pulling images from the Internet. 
KMGH is an ABC affiliate based in Denver, Colorado.
Via TalkingPointsMemo.

When Television Graphics Go Bad

"We are mortified this appeared during our 5 pm news broadcast," said Jeff Harris, KMGH-TV News Director. “The editor pulled the image of the book cover from the Internet without realizing it had been doctored.  We sincerely regret the error and have corrected the story to avoid any recurrence of its broadcast. We are following up internally as well to avoid a repeat of this inexcusable oversight.”

FJP: Yes, beware pulling images from the Internet. 

KMGH is an ABC affiliate based in Denver, Colorado.

Via TalkingPointsMemo.

Color Would Be Helpful
Via Flowing Data.

Color Would Be Helpful

Via Flowing Data.

Google Just Produced a MAD Visualization
Mapping Arms Data, that is. It visualizes the imports and exports of small arms, light weapons, and ammunition across 250 states and territories between 1992 and 2010. Specifically:

• Military weapons include artillery, mortars, machine guns (sub, light, and heavy), assault rifles, combat shotguns, and machine pistols.
• Civilian arms consist of pistols, revolvers, sporting shotguns, sporting rifles (anything not rated as a military item including fully automatic weaponry).
• Ammunition includes shotgun shells and small caliber ammo (anything below 14.5mm which isn’t fired from a shotgun).

It was produced as part of the Google Ideas INFO (Illicit Networks, Forces in Opposition) Summit. Read more about it here.
FJP: We particularly like its use of WebGL, which is a JavaScript API for rendering interactive graphics. It’s alarming, illuminating, and pretty mesmerizing to play with.
Image: Screenshot from the visualization.

Google Just Produced a MAD Visualization

Mapping Arms Data, that is. It visualizes the imports and exports of small arms, light weapons, and ammunition across 250 states and territories between 1992 and 2010. Specifically:

• Military weapons include artillery, mortars, machine guns (sub, light, and heavy), assault rifles, combat shotguns, and machine pistols.

• Civilian arms consist of pistols, revolvers, sporting shotguns, sporting rifles (anything not rated as a military item including fully automatic weaponry).

• Ammunition includes shotgun shells and small caliber ammo (anything below 14.5mm which isn’t fired from a shotgun).

It was produced as part of the Google Ideas INFO (Illicit Networks, Forces in Opposition) Summit. Read more about it here.

FJP: We particularly like its use of WebGL, which is a JavaScript API for rendering interactive graphics. It’s alarming, illuminating, and pretty mesmerizing to play with.

Image: Screenshot from the visualization.

Networked Donors: Political Moneyball

The Wall Street Journal takes a close look at political contributions in a thorough interactive that pulls data from monthly Federal Elections Commission reports.

Pictured above are overall individual and committee contributions (top); contributions and contributors to Restore Our Future, a PAC created to support Mitt Romney (middle left); the balance between ideological or single issue committees and the Democratic and Republican parties (middle right); and who health services and HMO’s are donating to (bottom). (Select any to embiggen).

It’s all very clicky with a various data points available under various layers so explore through.

Meanwhile, via the Wall Street Journal:

We all know that politics is awash in money, money that is accounted for in disclosures made public through the federal government. But the degree to which we understand this universe is limited by how well we can imagine how the players and the money are interconnected.

To better understand, we used social network software to analyze the universe of money in politics.

All the money in politics starts with donors — either individuals or groups like companies and unions. Their donations go to Political Action Committees (which represent the interests of companies or groups) or candidate or party committees (which finance campaigns and other political spending). These committees often send money to one another, which tells us a lot about who their friends are.

Based on the money sent between the players (and other characteristics like party and home state), our presentation pulls players toward similar players and pushes apart those that have nothing in common. The players who are most interconnected (like industry PACs who try to make alliances with everyone) end up close to the center. Those who are less connected (like a donor who only gives money to Ron Paul) are pushed away from the center. The resulting picture is a first-ever interactive portrait of the universe of money in politics, complete with obvious macro lessons (like the gulf between Democrats and Republicans) and with many micro stories that are still emerging.

The interactive was created using CartoDB, a geospatial platform from Vizzuality.

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence
Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.
Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence

Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.

Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.

Typographic Anatomy
Spine, crotch, arm and tail: Pop Chart Lab has a new poster to teach you everything you need to know about typography.
Image: Detail from Alphabet of Typography, an 18”x24” print from Pop Chart Lab.
Select image to embiggen.

Typographic Anatomy

Spine, crotch, arm and tail: Pop Chart Lab has a new poster to teach you everything you need to know about typography.

Image: Detail from Alphabet of Typography, an 18”x24” print from Pop Chart Lab.

Select image to embiggen.

jcstearns:

Visual Storytelling on Steroids
This is one slide from an incredible example of how graphic journalists are mashing up audio, photography and illustration to tell complex and in-depth stories.
This piece from Luke Radl focuses on the NATO protests in Chicago last month. Matt Bors of Cartoon Movement notes in an email that this may be the first cartoon in which all the text is in HTML, therefore search engine friendly.
Click through the entire piece, listen to the audio and check out the photos here: http://www.cartoonmovement.com/icomic/38 
P.S. For more great graphics journalism see Susie Cagle’s Tumblr.

jcstearns:

Visual Storytelling on Steroids

This is one slide from an incredible example of how graphic journalists are mashing up audio, photography and illustration to tell complex and in-depth stories.

This piece from Luke Radl focuses on the NATO protests in Chicago last month. Matt Bors of Cartoon Movement notes in an email that this may be the first cartoon in which all the text is in HTML, therefore search engine friendly.

Click through the entire piece, listen to the audio and check out the photos here: http://www.cartoonmovement.com/icomic/38 

P.S. For more great graphics journalism see Susie Cagle’s Tumblr.

dixiescotch:

Brilliant graphic design.

FJP: Some things only a book cover can do.

dixiescotch:

Brilliant graphic design.

FJP: Some things only a book cover can do.

(via alex-v-hernandez)

Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is.

In a recent TED talk, Chip Kidd walks us through the design process he used to produce iconic book covers over the last 20 years, from Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park to David Sedaris’ Naked.

His thoughts about digital books and tablets: “Much is to be gained by eBooks: ease, convenience, portability. But something is definitely lost: tradition, a sensual experience, the comfort of thingy-ness — a little bit of humanity.”

Bonus, Part 01: Has Kindle Killed the Book Cover? via The Atlantic.

Bonus, Part 02: Is the Book Cover Dead, via Technology Review

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…
Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.
Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.
The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Of Total Income Increase in 2010…

Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and New York Times Op-Ed contributor, writes:

In 2010, as the nation continued to recover from the recession, a dizzying 93 percent of the additional income created in the country that year, compared to 2009 — $288 billion — went to the top 1 percent of taxpayers, those with at least $352,000 in income. That delivered an average single-year pay increase of 11.6 percent to each of these households.

Still more astonishing was the extent to which the super rich got rich faster than the merely rich. In 2010, 37 percent of these additional earnings went to just the top 0.01 percent, a teaspoon-size collection of about 15,000 households with average incomes of $23.8 million. These fortunate few saw their incomes rise by 21.5 percent.

The bottom 99 percent received a microscopic $80 increase in pay per person in 2010, after adjusting for inflation. The top 1 percent, whose average income is $1,019,089, had an 11.6 percent increase in income.

Steven Rattner, The New York Times. The Rich Get Even Richer.

Country Codes of the World
Via ByteLevel.

Country Codes of the World

Via ByteLevel.