posts about or somewhat related to ‘guardian’

Well, Project X may now be called Vox, but the great VC-backed media blitz of 2014 is staffed up and soft-launching, and it looks a lot more like Projects XY. Indeed, it’s impossible not to notice that in the Bitcoin rush to revolutionize journalism, the protagonists are almost exclusively – and increasingly – male and white.

To be sure, the internet has presented journalists with an extraordinary opportunity to remake their own profession. And the rhetoric of the new wave of creativity in journalism is spattered with words that denote transformation. But the new micro-institutions of journalism already bear the hallmarks of the restrictive heritage they abandoned with such glee. At the risk of being the old bat in the back, allow me to quote Faye Dunaway’s character from Network: “Look, all I’m saying is if you’re going to hustle, at least do it right.”

Gender Balance in News
Open Gender Tracking Project is a software program that collects digital content from news sources and analyzes gender balance within news organizations. The project was created by Irene Ros and Adam Hyland of Bocoup and Nathan Matias of the MIT Center for Civic Media. 
The program collects data on who is writing the articles and who the articles are written about. It also measures audience response data directly associated with specific articles (like how many times a post is shared in social media). The goal of the program is to make news sources aware of content diversity (or lack thereof) so organizations can work toward maintaining a balanced set of voices. 
For the most part, women are currently being underrepresented in digital media. 
Via Guardian:

In the UK, newspaper front pages rarely include women, and women write a minority of articles. Women are prominent at the Daily Mail, where they write most of the celebrity news, fewer news articles, and almost no sport. Even when publications do include women, they’re often at the mercy of their audiences. 20% of Telegraph opinion articles are written by women, but women’s opinion articles attract only 14% of the Telegraph’s shares and likes on social media.

And according to studies done by the Women’s Media Center, in both legacy and newer news sites, women are too often relegated to writing about “pink topics” like fashion, relationships, and food, rather than urgent and/or international issues.
On a positive note, Global Voices, an international citizen media news site, is one of the only news organizations currently known to have equal gender participation. According to The Guardian, 764 women wrote 51% of all articles from 2005-2012. 
Related: Gender balance is the new rage. I just wish somebody had spread the word to the Wikiverse: Wikipedia Bumps Women From ‘American Novelists’ Category. - Krissy
Image: Screenshot of graph from Open Gender Tracker

Gender Balance in News

Open Gender Tracking Project is a software program that collects digital content from news sources and analyzes gender balance within news organizations. The project was created by Irene Ros and Adam Hyland of Bocoup and Nathan Matias of the MIT Center for Civic Media

The program collects data on who is writing the articles and who the articles are written about. It also measures audience response data directly associated with specific articles (like how many times a post is shared in social media). The goal of the program is to make news sources aware of content diversity (or lack thereof) so organizations can work toward maintaining a balanced set of voices.

For the most part, women are currently being underrepresented in digital media. 

Via Guardian:

In the UK, newspaper front pages rarely include women, and women write a minority of articles. Women are prominent at the Daily Mail, where they write most of the celebrity news, fewer news articles, and almost no sport. Even when publications do include women, they’re often at the mercy of their audiences. 20% of Telegraph opinion articles are written by women, but women’s opinion articles attract only 14% of the Telegraph’s shares and likes on social media.

And according to studies done by the Women’s Media Center, in both legacy and newer news sites, women are too often relegated to writing about “pink topics” like fashion, relationships, and food, rather than urgent and/or international issues.

On a positive note, Global Voices, an international citizen media news site, is one of the only news organizations currently known to have equal gender participation. According to The Guardian, 764 women wrote 51% of all articles from 2005-2012. 

Related: Gender balance is the new rage. I just wish somebody had spread the word to the Wikiverse: Wikipedia Bumps Women From ‘American Novelists’ Category. - Krissy

Image: Screenshot of graph from Open Gender Tracker

horaciogaray:

From the Guardian US, a simple site that tells you if a record was broken today, and if so, what records. It was pieced together with Google Docs and github, and uses the New York Times Olympics API. 

FJP: They also have an interesting experiment called the Guardian Olympics Second Screen that let’s you follow coverage via a timeline interface.

horaciogaray:

From the Guardian US, a simple site that tells you if a record was broken today, and if so, what records. It was pieced together with Google Docs and github, and uses the New York Times Olympics API. 

FJP: They also have an interesting experiment called the Guardian Olympics Second Screen that let’s you follow coverage via a timeline interface.

#OpenJournalism

In ten concise tweets Guardian Editor in Chief Alan Rusbridger tries his hand at defining open journalism.

Select to embiggen.

How the Guardian's US move added 4m readers →

dbloom:

The Guardian moved its online operation to the US, jumped on coverage of the Occupy movement before just about anyone else, and rode that savvy journalistic decision to a huge increase in readership. 

Now comes the hard part, continuing the momentum and growing a stronger US brand than it had even in England before. This interview with the Guardian’s editor here suggests a few lessons. Now I wonder how many UK pubs will start sending their online crews over here to make their fortunes. 

FJP: British Invasion, 2012 edition.

Breaking: Third Little Pig Arrested for Murdering Wolf

There’s so much win in this Guardian advertisement that reimagines the story of the Three Little Pigs happening today.

H/T: Nieman Lab

Following The Guardian's Hack Day →

What happens when you stick a news organization’s developers in a room and say have at it?

You can find out by following The Guardian’s ”digital development team as they spend a Hack Day working on prototypes of potential new developments for the Guardian.”

Current update: if (Shearer.got_manager_job == true) { watch("MOTD") } else { sleep() }

Here’s and excerpt of Clay Shirky’s take on Brisbane’s question via The Guardian’s Comment is Free.

This is what was so extraordinary about his original question: he is evidently so steeped in newsroom culture that he does not understand – literally, does not understand, as we know from his subsequent clarifications – that this is not a hard question at all, considered from thereaders’ perspective. Readers do not care about the epistemological differences between lies and weasel words; we want newspapers to limit the ability of politicians to make dubious assertions without penalty. Judging from the reactions to his post, most of us never understood that this wasn’t the newspapers’ self-conceived mission in the first place.

Continue reading on the Guardian.

Here’s and excerpt of Clay Shirky’s take on Brisbane’s question via The Guardian’s Comment is Free.

This is what was so extraordinary about his original question: he is evidently so steeped in newsroom culture that he does not understand – literally, does not understand, as we know from his subsequent clarifications – that this is not a hard question at all, considered from thereaders’ perspective. Readers do not care about the epistemological differences between lies and weasel words; we want newspapers to limit the ability of politicians to make dubious assertions without penalty. Judging from the reactions to his post, most of us never understood that this wasn’t the newspapers’ self-conceived mission in the first place.

Continue reading on the Guardian.

Guardian Starts Charging 280,000 iPad Readers From Friday; How Will It Go?
From paidContent (a subsidiary of the Guardian)

Starting Friday, The Guardian, a stalwart of free content, will find out just how many people will pay to read its news on tablets.
Free since its mid-October launch thanks to a Channel 4 sponsorship, the publisher’s newspaper-like, iOS 5-only iPad app will require a £9.99 monthly subscription from January 13.
How will it fare? Guardian News & Media claims 500,000 downloads since launch, but the real number of users is half that - the app had 280,000 active users in December, the publisher tells paidContent.
If The Guardian converts 17 percent of last month’s readers (that’s the proportion of its iPhone users who have subscribed), itcould achieve 47,600 paying iPad customers, yielding about £475,000 in monthly sales, before 30 percent is given to Apple.
Half a million people have tried the app so far in three months. For new users, the conversion tactic will be free trial - they getseven days of free access before a hard-stop subscription requirement.
That is unlike The Guardian’s iPhone app, which gives all users three free stories every day before requiring a monthly subscription (£2.99 for six months, £4.99 for 12 months, free in the U.S.).
If there is a challenge to the plan, however, it is that The Guardian gives readers an easy choice to revert to using its free Guardian.co.uk website.
The attractive iPad app was designed to showcase stories from the daily newspaper. Exploring related and other articles take users out of the paid app experience and to the same website nobody pays anything for.
Guardian.co.uk is also pushing some of the same content found in the app out for free to Facebook and Tumblr, while the app lacks some of the editorial components Guardian.co.uk trades most heavily on, like live blogs.

Guardian Starts Charging 280,000 iPad Readers From Friday; How Will It Go?

From paidContent (a subsidiary of the Guardian)

Starting Friday, The Guardian, a stalwart of free content, will find out just how many people will pay to read its news on tablets.

Free since its mid-October launch thanks to a Channel 4 sponsorship, the publisher’s newspaper-like, iOS 5-only iPad app will require a £9.99 monthly subscription from January 13.

How will it fare? Guardian News & Media claims 500,000 downloads since launch, but the real number of users is half that - the app had 280,000 active users in December, the publisher tells paidContent.

If The Guardian converts 17 percent of last month’s readers (that’s the proportion of its iPhone users who have subscribed), itcould achieve 47,600 paying iPad customers, yielding about £475,000 in monthly sales, before 30 percent is given to Apple.

Half a million people have tried the app so far in three months. For new users, the conversion tactic will be free trial - they getseven days of free access before a hard-stop subscription requirement.

That is unlike The Guardian’s iPhone app, which gives all users three free stories every day before requiring a monthly subscription (£2.99 for six months, £4.99 for 12 months, free in the U.S.).

If there is a challenge to the plan, however, it is that The Guardian gives readers an easy choice to revert to using its free Guardian.co.uk website.

The attractive iPad app was designed to showcase stories from the daily newspaper. Exploring related and other articles take users out of the paid app experience and to the same website nobody pays anything for.

Guardian.co.uk is also pushing some of the same content found in the app out for free to Facebook and Tumblr, while the app lacks some of the editorial components Guardian.co.uk trades most heavily on, like live blogs.


If you choose your own news, you’ll be less well read by Peter Preston
Digital news offers customers the choice of what they want to read. But print offers something extra: stories that people didn’t know they wanted to read until they had read them

I wanted to post this article because we talked a lot about this in Studio 20. My own thought on this is that if we made complicated issues easier to understand then people will want to read it.  As journalists, we need find ways to make direct links between the mortgage crisis and what it means for YOU the reader.  People want to read top news — digitally and through print.  More importantly, they want to read news that’s easy to understand. 
When I spoke to Tony Haile from Chartbeat-a live analytics service, he addressed the fear that Editors who take analytics seriously will end up doing a lot more stories on celebs and gossip and he’s found that the audience is smarter than that.  Sometimes a change in title or position of the post can change the click-through rates.  (This video will be up soon on the new FJP)
The solution is for us to not fear personalized curation of news but for us journalists to take advantage of the medium so that we can do our jobs better. 
- Chao Li @cli6cli6
What’s your take on personalizing the news? 

If you choose your own news, you’ll be less well read by Peter Preston

Digital news offers customers the choice of what they want to read. But print offers something extra: stories that people didn’t know they wanted to read until they had read them

I wanted to post this article because we talked a lot about this in Studio 20. My own thought on this is that if we made complicated issues easier to understand then people will want to read it.  As journalists, we need find ways to make direct links between the mortgage crisis and what it means for YOU the reader.  People want to read top news — digitally and through print.  More importantly, they want to read news that’s easy to understand. 

When I spoke to Tony Haile from Chartbeat-a live analytics service, he addressed the fear that Editors who take analytics seriously will end up doing a lot more stories on celebs and gossip and he’s found that the audience is smarter than that.  Sometimes a change in title or position of the post can change the click-through rates.  (This video will be up soon on the new FJP)

The solution is for us to not fear personalized curation of news but for us journalists to take advantage of the medium so that we can do our jobs better. 

- Chao Li @cli6cli6

What’s your take on personalizing the news? 

Check out this great round up of data driven stories put together by the Guardian.co.uk

Check out this great round up of data driven stories put together by the Guardian.co.uk

Mexico’s Drug War
The Guardian is publishing an important and eye-opening series that explores Mexico’s ongoing drug war. 
The series mixes media with stories presented in a variety of formats. For example:
Text: The US gun smugglers recruited by one of Mexico’s most brutal cartels 
Interactive: Mexico’s war on drugs: stories from the front line
Video: Mexico drug wars: ‘the majority of the weapons used by the cartels are coming from the US’
Image: Still from an interactive timeline indicating that Mexican media organizations estimate 45,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence over the past five years.

Mexico’s Drug War

The Guardian is publishing an important and eye-opening series that explores Mexico’s ongoing drug war

The series mixes media with stories presented in a variety of formats. For example:

Image: Still from an interactive timeline indicating that Mexican media organizations estimate 45,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence over the past five years.

The newspaper’s latest quirky digital experiment is a Twitter-scaling search bot called @GuardianTagBot, launched in beta last week, which is already getting a warm reception. When someone tweets a few search terms (though just one at a time may work better) at the bot, it tweets back with a link to a list of the latest news stories on the Guardian’s site, making use of the tagging system on the website, to quickly deliver relevant search results on command.
The Guardian Launches a New U.S. Homepage


Janine Gibson, editor in chief of Guardian U.S., explains the new venture on The Guardian blog.
“We hope that by presenting a targeted homepage, we’ll be able to better display the stories that are most relevant to our U.S. readers,” she writes, adding that users can look at the UK homepage or the U.S. homepage while anywhere in the world by using a button at the top lefthand corner of the homepage.
In addition to launching the U.S.-centric homepage, Gibson says The Guardian is hiring a new U.S. team of writers, technologists and editors to work alongside its UK journalists. She says the team will build on successes such as live blogging during the Middle East uprisings, as well as investigative reporting.
“We’ll also be drawing on reporting from the hundreds of Guardian journalists based around the world,” she writes.
The new U.S. homepage can be accessed via GuardianNews.com — not GuardianAmerica.com, the URL used when The Guardian last attempted a similar venture. Launched in 2007, the GuardianAmerica.com portal was abandoned in 2009 with a U.S. consultant saying The Guardian would focus on getting content to readers via social networks, blogs and search engines.



For the rest of the article, check out Mashable

The Guardian Launches a New U.S. Homepage

Janine Gibson, editor in chief of Guardian U.S., explains the new venture on The Guardian blog.

“We hope that by presenting a targeted homepage, we’ll be able to better display the stories that are most relevant to our U.S. readers,” she writes, adding that users can look at the UK homepage or the U.S. homepage while anywhere in the world by using a button at the top lefthand corner of the homepage.

In addition to launching the U.S.-centric homepage, Gibson says The Guardian is hiring a new U.S. team of writers, technologists and editors to work alongside its UK journalists. She says the team will build on successes such as live blogging during the Middle East uprisings, as well as investigative reporting.

“We’ll also be drawing on reporting from the hundreds of Guardian journalists based around the world,” she writes.

The new U.S. homepage can be accessed via GuardianNews.com — not GuardianAmerica.com, the URL used when The Guardian last attempted a similar venture. Launched in 2007, the GuardianAmerica.com portal was abandoned in 2009 with a U.S. consultant saying The Guardian would focus on getting content to readers via social networks, blogs and search engines.

For the rest of the article, check out Mashable