Posts tagged with ‘haiti’

Mapping Zombie Survival
Little did I know that we’ve actually posted about zombies a number of times. Even littler did I realize that I’m the one doing it.
Anyway, it’s Halloween, and while we’re distracted by our city’s recovery from a rather large storm, it wouldn’t be a proper Halloween without a proper zombie post.
So, let’s start: MapOfTheDead, pictured above for your mapping pleasure… and an upcoming mobile game.
But more importantly, via Amy Wilentz in the New York Times, is an understanding of where zombies are from:

Most people think of [zombies] as the walking dead, a being without a soul or someone with no free will. This is true. But the zombie is not an alien enemy who’s been CGI-ed by Hollywood. He is a New World phenomenon that arose from the mixture of old African religious beliefs and the pain of slavery, especially the notoriously merciless and coldblooded slavery of French-run, pre-independence Haiti. In Africa, a dying person’s soul might be stolen and stoppered up in a ritual bottle for later use. But the full-blown zombie was a very logical offspring of New World slavery.
For the slave under French rule in Haiti — then Saint-Domingue — in the 17th and 18th centuries, life was brutal: hunger, extreme overwork and cruel discipline were the rule. Slaves often could not consume enough calories to allow for normal rates of reproduction; what children they did have might easily starve. That was not of great concern to the plantation masters, who felt that children were a waste of resources, since they weren’t able to work properly until they reached 10 or so. More manpower could always be imported from the Middle Passage.
The only escape from the sugar plantations was death, which was seen as a return to Africa, or lan guinée (literally Guinea, or West Africa). This is the phrase in Haitian Creole that even now means heaven. The plantation meant a life in servitude; lan guinée meant freedom. Death was feared but also wished for. Not surprisingly, suicide was a frequent recourse of the slaves, who were handy with poisons and powders. The plantation masters thought of suicide as the worst kind of thievery, since it deprived the master not only of a slave’s service, but also of his or her person, which was, after all, the master’s property. Suicide was the slave’s only way to take control over his or her own body.

Amy Wilenz, New York Times. A Zombie Is a Slave Forever.
Image: Detail, Map of the Dead. Created by doejo, a Chicago-based digital agency.

Mapping Zombie Survival

Little did I know that we’ve actually posted about zombies a number of times. Even littler did I realize that I’m the one doing it.

Anyway, it’s Halloween, and while we’re distracted by our city’s recovery from a rather large storm, it wouldn’t be a proper Halloween without a proper zombie post.

So, let’s start: MapOfTheDead, pictured above for your mapping pleasure… and an upcoming mobile game.

But more importantly, via Amy Wilentz in the New York Times, is an understanding of where zombies are from:

Most people think of [zombies] as the walking dead, a being without a soul or someone with no free will. This is true. But the zombie is not an alien enemy who’s been CGI-ed by Hollywood. He is a New World phenomenon that arose from the mixture of old African religious beliefs and the pain of slavery, especially the notoriously merciless and coldblooded slavery of French-run, pre-independence Haiti. In Africa, a dying person’s soul might be stolen and stoppered up in a ritual bottle for later use. But the full-blown zombie was a very logical offspring of New World slavery.

For the slave under French rule in Haiti — then Saint-Domingue — in the 17th and 18th centuries, life was brutal: hunger, extreme overwork and cruel discipline were the rule. Slaves often could not consume enough calories to allow for normal rates of reproduction; what children they did have might easily starve. That was not of great concern to the plantation masters, who felt that children were a waste of resources, since they weren’t able to work properly until they reached 10 or so. More manpower could always be imported from the Middle Passage.

The only escape from the sugar plantations was death, which was seen as a return to Africa, or lan guinée (literally Guinea, or West Africa). This is the phrase in Haitian Creole that even now means heaven. The plantation meant a life in servitude; lan guinée meant freedom. Death was feared but also wished for. Not surprisingly, suicide was a frequent recourse of the slaves, who were handy with poisons and powders. The plantation masters thought of suicide as the worst kind of thievery, since it deprived the master not only of a slave’s service, but also of his or her person, which was, after all, the master’s property. Suicide was the slave’s only way to take control over his or her own body.

Amy Wilenz, New York Times. A Zombie Is a Slave Forever.

Image: Detail, Map of the Dead. Created by doejo, a Chicago-based digital agency.

Twitter Tracks Cholera in Haiti →

A new study demonstrates that Twitter updates and online news sites give researchers faster access to — and reliable indicators of — disease outbreaks.

Via New Scientist:

In a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, researchers studied the progression of a cholera epidemic in Haiti after the devastating earthquake in 2010.

The study’s lead author Rumi Chunara, a research fellow at Harvard Medical School, used a piece of software called HealthMap to monitor how many times the epidemic was mentioned online during the first 100 days of the outbreak - from October 20, 2010 to January 28, 2011. Her research team also looked at the number of posts on Twitter that mentioned the word cholera.

They discovered 4697 online reports via HealthMap in eight different languages, and 188,819 tweets. Using this data they were able to monitor how the outbreak was progressing. They found that information gleaned from online sources in this way closely matched the official reports, gathered by surveying hospitals and health clinics. The only difference - and huge advantage - was that the online data was available in almost real time, nearly two weeks before the official reports from the government health ministry were available.

This is reminiscent of Google Flu Trends which maps the outbreak of flu around the world based on global search queries. The elegant idea behind it is that as people get sick they search online for information about their symptoms.

Map those results and you have an early detection system for seasonal influenza outbreaks that kill 250,000 to 500,000 people annually.

Study: Social and News Media Enable Estimation of Epidemiological Patterns Early in the 2010 Haitian Cholera Outbreak.

Consent must come from the owner of the story.

Consent must be given for a specific use.

Meaningful consent is given at an appropriate time

Meaningful consent repeats itself.

Jina Moore, freelance journalist, outlines four basic rules journalists should harbor when reporting stories similar to  Mac McClelland’s account of the effects of PTSD in Haiti in this article.

Although this article is intended for travel writers, all journalists should make these ethical considerations before interviewing a source.

H/T: Richard Stupart, Matador Notebook, "Travel writing ethics from trauma journalism"

rommy:

Debate Over Fabienne Cherisma Photos Rekindled After Award Given (via PetaPixel)
“This behind-the-scenes look depicting photojournalists crowded around the scene of a tragic incident (continuing even after the family arrived and were grieving) shows what commonly needs to take place for the powerful images you see on the front page of newspapers and magazines.”

rommy:

Debate Over Fabienne Cherisma Photos Rekindled After Award Given (via PetaPixel)

This behind-the-scenes look depicting photojournalists crowded around the scene of a tragic incident (continuing even after the family arrived and were grieving) shows what commonly needs to take place for the powerful images you see on the front page of newspapers and magazines.”