Posts tagged with ‘how to’

explore-blog:

“Moral: Even a well-bound book may be easily ruined at first opening.” 
So you know, how to open a new book – usage tips from a legendary bookbinder. Complement with Mortimer Adler’s tips on how to read a book.

FJP: Interface pro tips. We like it.

explore-blog:

“Moral: Even a well-bound book may be easily ruined at first opening.”

So you know, how to open a new book – usage tips from a legendary bookbinder. Complement with Mortimer Adler’s tips on how to read a book.

FJP: Interface pro tips. We like it.

(Source: explore-blog)

Journalist Security Guide
The Committee to Protect Journalists just released an extensive online guide for journalism security:

This guide details what journalists need to know in a new and changing world. It is aimed at local and international journalists of varied levels of experience. The guide outlines basic preparedness for new journalists taking on their first assignments around the world, offers refresher information for mid-career journalists returning to the field, and provides advice on complex issues such as digital security and threat assessment for journalists of all experience levels.

Topics covered include:
Basic Preparedness
Assessing and Responding to Risk
Information Security
Armed Conflic
Organized Crime and Corruption
Civial Matters and Disturbances
Natural Disasters
Health Epidemics and Mass Hazards
Sustained Risks
Stress Reactions
Check it. Share it. Great stuff.

Journalist Security Guide

The Committee to Protect Journalists just released an extensive online guide for journalism security:

This guide details what journalists need to know in a new and changing world. It is aimed at local and international journalists of varied levels of experience. The guide outlines basic preparedness for new journalists taking on their first assignments around the world, offers refresher information for mid-career journalists returning to the field, and provides advice on complex issues such as digital security and threat assessment for journalists of all experience levels.

Topics covered include:

  • Basic Preparedness
  • Assessing and Responding to Risk
  • Information Security
  • Armed Conflic
  • Organized Crime and Corruption
  • Civial Matters and Disturbances
  • Natural Disasters
  • Health Epidemics and Mass Hazards
  • Sustained Risks
  • Stress Reactions

Check it. Share it. Great stuff.



Science of a Good Headline

1. Avoid Cliché Terms
People stopped responding to cliché terms such as ‘high quality’, ‘number one’, and ‘top of the line’ a long time ago. It takes more than that to convince viewers that what they’ll get is different from the rest.
2. Going straight to the point vs. creative headlines
A direct, brief headline works in some cases, as do creative headlines. It depends on the situation really–direct headlines make use of the product characteristics and features; while the indirect headline is used to grab attention.
A direct headline gets straight to the point, with no intention to use creative tools or flowery words. Some examples of direct titles are: ‘Top Free iPod Apps’ and ‘West Jet Seat Sale at 50%’. Customers who are in a hurry, who want to get a benefit rather than entertainment, will prefer direct headlines–titles that get it right to the point.
The indirect headline otherwise ‘sells indirectly’. They are more subtle, using curiosity to intrigue the reader into knowing more.





for the rest of the tips, see 1stwebdesigner.

Science of a Good Headline

1. Avoid Cliché Terms

People stopped responding to cliché terms such as ‘high quality’, ‘number one’, and ‘top of the line’ a long time ago. It takes more than that to convince viewers that what they’ll get is different from the rest.

2. Going straight to the point vs. creative headlines

A direct, brief headline works in some cases, as do creative headlines. It depends on the situation really–direct headlines make use of the product characteristics and features; while the indirect headline is used to grab attention.

A direct headline gets straight to the point, with no intention to use creative tools or flowery words. Some examples of direct titles are: ‘Top Free iPod Apps’ and ‘West Jet Seat Sale at 50%’. Customers who are in a hurry, who want to get a benefit rather than entertainment, will prefer direct headlines–titles that get it right to the point.

The indirect headline otherwise ‘sells indirectly’. They are more subtle, using curiosity to intrigue the reader into knowing more.

for the rest of the tips, see 1stwebdesigner.