Posts tagged html5

Now, using the latest news-providing technologies, The Onion introduces a format that allows you to touch the news. That’s right. Swipe it, poke it, berate it, and it reacts accordingly.

The Onion launches its iPad App.

For the geeks, they went with HTML5 rather than Objective C, telling the New York Times, “We chose to build the iPad app in HTML5 so we could avoid having to learn a new programming language. We are a small company and we wanted to keep the development as simple as possible as we’re now managing a number of other apps.”

Despite the fact that for years we could see a Roger Black design factory coming like balls on a tall dog, we all have our panties in a twist seeing his dark vision actualized.

Andrea Dunham, Creative Director, People, discussing the companies the legendary magazine designer Roger Black has launched. The companies provide multi-platform design templates (Ready-Media) and cross-platform design implementation (Treesaver).

Black’s critics accuse him of dumbing down design and attempting to make in-house designers obsolete.

Ben Popper, Betabeat, Magazine Icon Roger Black: The iPad is Not a Magic Pony.

Is Now the Time for Publishers to Implement HTML5?

O’Reilly’s Jenn Web interviews Google’s Marcin Wichary who explains the (mostly) pros and (limited) cons of implementing HTML5.

Notes Wichary

It’s very important to recognize that HTML5 fits all the devices you can think of, from the iPhone in your pocket to Google TV to the tablets to small screens and big screens. It’s very easy to take the content you already have and through the “magic” of HTML5, refine it so it works very well within a given context. You don’t have to do your work over and over again. Of course, all of these different means come with different monetization opportunities, like ads on the web or on mobile devices.

From FLV to HTML5? Yes, and Adobe calls this tool Wallaby.

We missed this in the fall when it first premiered at Adobe Max but caught it today via Engadget:

[Adobe’s] Labs research team has just released an experimental new dev tool, dubbed Wallaby, that’s targeted at taking Flash-encoded artwork and animations and turning them into a more compatible mix of HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Of course, the intent here is not some magnanimous move to free us from the shackles of Flash — Adobe openly admits that the initial goal for the new tool will be to help convert animated banner ads so that they work on the iOS platform — but hey, even bad tools can be used for good sometimes, right?

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.
The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.
The Argument: 

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…
…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.
It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”. 

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.

The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.

The Argument:

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…

…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.

It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”.

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

Get to know a Logo
Web standards body W3C released its HTML5 logo.

It stands strong and true, resilient and universal as the markup you write. It shines as bright and as bold as the forward-thinking, dedicated web developers you are. It’s the standard’s standard, a pennant for progress. And it certainly doesn’t use tables for layout.

We present an HTML5 logo.

Get to know a Logo

Web standards body W3C released its HTML5 logo.

It stands strong and true, resilient and universal as the markup you write. It shines as bright and as bold as the forward-thinking, dedicated web developers you are. It’s the standard’s standard, a pennant for progress. And it certainly doesn’t use tables for layout.

We present an HTML5 logo.