Posts tagged humor

Field Guide to Facial Hair in Tech
Via Wired:

In Silicon Valley, the beard is everything — unless you’re a woman or you’re Mark Zuckerberg and you can’t grow one. For everyone else, a beard is essential to Silicon Valley success. But not just any beard. You must carefully grow your facial hair to suit your particular role in the tech ecosystem.

Read through to view the rest.

Field Guide to Facial Hair in Tech

Via Wired:

In Silicon Valley, the beard is everything — unless you’re a woman or you’re Mark Zuckerberg and you can’t grow one. For everyone else, a beard is essential to Silicon Valley success. But not just any beard. You must carefully grow your facial hair to suit your particular role in the tech ecosystem.

Read through to view the rest.

The Intern, Part 2: Is it Hot in Here

Competition to become the Lady Business intern heats up as Erik claims he’s the “biggest feminist” he knows and Ashley is prepared to go the extra mile.

Learn more about Lady Business here and join them on Facebook, YouTube and/or Tumblr.

Initial Reactions from #PoynterEthics
We’re hoping Jihii will write a thought provoking analysis of what she heard, saw and talked about at today’s Poynter symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age.
Meantime, she wrote a note to us this afternoon.
We added some starstruck purples and pinks and blueish hues to it because yes, she is this excited about this stuff.

Initial Reactions from #PoynterEthics

We’re hoping Jihii will write a thought provoking analysis of what she heard, saw and talked about at today’s Poynter symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age.

Meantime, she wrote a note to us this afternoon.

We added some starstruck purples and pinks and blueish hues to it because yes, she is this excited about this stuff.

Lady Business: Newscast, October 2012

Earlier this month we mentioned that we partnered on a satirical news show called Lady Business. And here, to get your pregame on for tonight’s debate, is the first newscast.

Lady Business follows the exploits Rebecca Whitehurst and Jenny Grace. The shows will alternate between newscasts like this and behind the scenes episodes as they try to build their news empire.

For updates, follow Rebecca and Jenny on Tumblr, Facebook or YouTube.

Runtime: ~13:30

The Meme vs. The Campaign Ad
So on Tuesday, governor Romney made a gaffe, which turned into a meme, which now lives on the internet in various ways, shapes and forms.
At the time, the folks at American Bridge, the Democratic political action committee, were thinking on their feet. They very quickly purchased the domain bindersfullofwomen.com, and turned the spontaneous reaction into an institutional campaign resource.
The Atlantic:

While the BindersFullofWomen Tumblr, not to mention the Twitter feeds @RomneysBinder and @Romneys_Binder, are alive and well, the dot.com version of the meme has gone pretty much fully official. The newly claimed website now features a Tumblr-powered collection of Democrat-friendly policy papers: Romney’s policies toward young women, Romney’s policies toward working women, Romney’s policies toward senior women. The site is now slick and unapologetically political and unapologetically lacking in the of-the-Internet sensibility that the defines a meme in its more organic state. The cheekiness and sloppiness of the BindersFullofWomen Tumblr has been transformed, here, into yet another outlet for the publication of political literature. The cheeky has been claimed by the savvy.

FJP: That American Bridge thought to capitalize on the event certainly does reflect an evolution of sorts. That the site has much of a following isn’t very likely. Just look at the difference in # of notes on the binders full of women Tumblr, run by @HeyVeronica, and and the binders full of women Website, also powered by Tumblr but owned and run by American Bridge. It’s an interesting juxtaposition.
Bonus: The DNC has taken advantage of the web to prank Romney as well. Not unlike negative TV campaign ads.
Afterthought: It’s a little bit difficult not be disheartened by all of the above. Interesting as it is to watch communication evolve, it seems that we’re merely updating our tools of humor and terror. —Jihii
Image: Via bindersfullofwomen.tumblr.com

The Meme vs. The Campaign Ad

So on Tuesday, governor Romney made a gaffe, which turned into a meme, which now lives on the internet in various ways, shapes and forms.

At the time, the folks at American Bridge, the Democratic political action committee, were thinking on their feet. They very quickly purchased the domain bindersfullofwomen.com, and turned the spontaneous reaction into an institutional campaign resource.

The Atlantic:

While the BindersFullofWomen Tumblr, not to mention the Twitter feeds @RomneysBinder and @Romneys_Binder, are alive and well, the dot.com version of the meme has gone pretty much fully official. The newly claimed website now features a Tumblr-powered collection of Democrat-friendly policy papers: Romney’s policies toward young women, Romney’s policies toward working women, Romney’s policies toward senior women. The site is now slick and unapologetically political and unapologetically lacking in the of-the-Internet sensibility that the defines a meme in its more organic state. The cheekiness and sloppiness of the BindersFullofWomen Tumblr has been transformed, here, into yet another outlet for the publication of political literature. The cheeky has been claimed by the savvy.

FJP: That American Bridge thought to capitalize on the event certainly does reflect an evolution of sorts. That the site has much of a following isn’t very likely. Just look at the difference in # of notes on the binders full of women Tumblr, run by @HeyVeronica, and and the binders full of women Website, also powered by Tumblr but owned and run by American Bridge. It’s an interesting juxtaposition.

Bonus: The DNC has taken advantage of the web to prank Romney as well. Not unlike negative TV campaign ads.

Afterthought: It’s a little bit difficult not be disheartened by all of the above. Interesting as it is to watch communication evolve, it seems that we’re merely updating our tools of humor and terror. —Jihii

Image: Via bindersfullofwomen.tumblr.com

Onion Talks

Yes, the Onion is launching a series of fake TED Talks. Series starts October 17 on YouTube.

Wonder what’s going on in the world and how to find out about it?
See yesterday’s Doonesbury and know you’re not alone.
Click to embiggen.

Wonder what’s going on in the world and how to find out about it?

See yesterday’s Doonesbury and know you’re not alone.

Click to embiggen.

srsly? srsly.
Personally thought it was YouTube comments. — Michael
Via @lmoliva_.

srsly? srsly.

Personally thought it was YouTube comments. — Michael

Via @lmoliva_.

producermatthew:

So this just happened on CNN.

FJP: Will Ferrell & Zack Galifianakis respond. Oh my.

producermatthew:

So this just happened on CNN.

FJP: Will Ferrell & Zack Galifianakis respond. Oh my.

We're Number One

Slate has a delightful list of 24 “weird, surprising, and inspiring” things the United States is still number one in. Here are just a couple:

Cheese. No one churns out pressed milk curds like we do. (Well, unless you count the European Union’s 27 members as a single entity—but let’s not.) Here’s to you, Wisconsin.

Foreign aid. The United States gives the most overall for both development and humanitarian purposes. Sure, Norway gives more per capita. But we have more a lot more capitas.

C02 emission reductions. No, this statistic does not come from some parallel universe in which Al Gore defeated George W. Bush. According to the International Energy Agency, the United States’ economic slowdown and natural gas boom have combined to make it the world’s largest reducer of carbon emissions since 2006, cutting 7.7 percent. Who needs the Kyoto Protocol when we’ve got fracking?

Generosity. What American decline? The United States jumped from fifth place to first in the U.K.-based Charity Aid Foundation’s latest World Giving Index, which grades countries on three metrics: volunteering, helping strangers, and donating money.

Media. We have the most newspapers, radios, television broadcast stations, and hours of television watched per day. Oops, maybe that last one isn’t so inspiring. But hey, it’s a holiday. 

Slate, The USA Is Number One (in Cheese Production)!

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Via Michael Mahemoff.

http colon slash slash w w w

Via Michael Mahemoff.

Thank You Hater!

Isabel Fay and Tom Hopgood join forces to thank the wonderful trolls that ask, nay, demand, that we die. Musical style. And with a masturbating monkey.

H/T: The Next Web.

Loving the Future in Chinese - how, sometimes, absurdism online is the best way to make sense
(Inspired by the Guardian’s Battles for the Internet series)
We all know that China has the world’s largest online population, and its government is among the most intrusive when it comes to censorship.
But what we may not is that on China’s domestic sites, posts about sensitive issues — Tibet, ousted officials, and occasional village rebellions — are often deleted quickly, and searches for similar terms are usually blocked. So how do people get around them?
With humor. via Offbeat China:

The most interesting of all is the case of “Teletubbies vs. Master Kong”. This is not a new cartoon and surely not meant for kids, either. That is the argot for what might be happening or have happened in a rumored “coup” in Beijing.
Almost overnight, everybody on Sina Weibo becomes part of a “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” reality show – they look for traces of truth in every rumor, and in their hands lies a secret code book.


“According to unreliable resource, the 18th tug war has a winner. The winner is the team of dragon led by carrot and his team mates Teletubby, Subor study machine and wood son Li. The team led by Master Kong beef instant noodle was defeated because they lost tomato and it was a great loss.”

Total nonsense? Not if you know the ciphers.
Carrot: 胡萝卜(hu luo bo), a vegetable = 胡锦涛 (hu jin tao), President of China
Teletubby: 天线宝宝 (tian xian bao bao), popular cartoon character = 温家宝 (wen jia bao), Prime Minister of China
Subor study machine: 小霸王学习机 (xiao ba wang xue xi ji), famous brand of children electronics = 习近平 (xi jin ping), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been speculated as China’s next President
Wood son Li: 木子李 (mu zi li) = 李克强 (li ke qiang), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been rumored to be China’s next Prime Minister
Master Kong: 康师傅 (kang shi fu), famous instant noodle brand = 周永康 (zhou yong kang), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been rumored to be a supporter of Bo Xilai
Tomato: 西红柿 (xi hong shi), a vegetable = 薄熙来 (bo xi lai), fallen political star that has been the center of recent political dramas in China

Outrageous? Yes. Inventive? Yes. Necessary? Yes.
This one is a bit less silly: Ai Weiwei, China’s most famous artist and government dissident, who was jailed for several months last year and remains under close watch at his house in Beijing, has long been a human rights icon for Chinese people. But he’s scarcely mentioned online due to censors and rules, and so netizens have slightly altered the three Chinese characters in his name to give the sounds new meaning.
via the Atlantic:

Term: Love the Future.
Definition: “‘Love the future’ is a coded reference to Chinese artist and dissident, Ai Weiwei (艾未未) that began to be used after Ai’s disappearance in early 2011. Ai’s surname sounds the same as the word ‘love’ in Chinese, and his given name ‘Weiwei’ can be converted into the word “future” by adding two small strokes to the second character.” 

For more on this weird but not inaccessible phenomenon, see the China Digital Times’ lexicon of Chinese terms used online.
Photo: The Atlantic

Loving the Future in Chinese - how, sometimes, absurdism online is the best way to make sense

(Inspired by the Guardian’s Battles for the Internet series)

We all know that China has the world’s largest online population, and its government is among the most intrusive when it comes to censorship.

But what we may not is that on China’s domestic sites, posts about sensitive issues — Tibet, ousted officials, and occasional village rebellions — are often deleted quickly, and searches for similar terms are usually blocked. So how do people get around them?

With humor. via Offbeat China:

The most interesting of all is the case of “Teletubbies vs. Master Kong”. This is not a new cartoon and surely not meant for kids, either. That is the argot for what might be happening or have happened in a rumored “coup” in Beijing.

Almost overnight, everybody on Sina Weibo becomes part of a “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” reality show – they look for traces of truth in every rumor, and in their hands lies a secret code book.

“According to unreliable resource, the 18th tug war has a winner. The winner is the team of dragon led by carrot and his team mates Teletubby, Subor study machine and wood son Li. The team led by Master Kong beef instant noodle was defeated because they lost tomato and it was a great loss.”

Total nonsense? Not if you know the ciphers.

Carrot: 胡萝卜(hu luo bo), a vegetable = 胡锦涛 (hu jin tao), President of China

Teletubby: 天线宝宝 (tian xian bao bao), popular cartoon character = 温家宝 (wen jia bao), Prime Minister of China

Subor study machine: 小霸王学习机 (xiao ba wang xue xi ji), famous brand of children electronics = 习近平 (xi jin ping), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been speculated as China’s next President

Wood son Li: 木子李 (mu zi li) = 李克强 (li ke qiang), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been rumored to be China’s next Prime Minister

Master Kong: 康师傅 (kang shi fu), famous instant noodle brand = 周永康 (zhou yong kang), one of China’s 9-member Politburo and who has been rumored to be a supporter of Bo Xilai

Tomato: 西红柿 (xi hong shi), a vegetable = 薄熙来 (bo xi lai), fallen political star that has been the center of recent political dramas in China

Outrageous? Yes. Inventive? Yes. Necessary? Yes.

This one is a bit less silly: Ai Weiwei, China’s most famous artist and government dissident, who was jailed for several months last year and remains under close watch at his house in Beijing, has long been a human rights icon for Chinese people. But he’s scarcely mentioned online due to censors and rules, and so netizens have slightly altered the three Chinese characters in his name to give the sounds new meaning.

via the Atlantic:

Term: Love the Future.

Definition: “‘Love the future’ is a coded reference to Chinese artist and dissident, Ai Weiwei (艾未未) that began to be used after Ai’s disappearance in early 2011. Ai’s surname sounds the same as the word ‘love’ in Chinese, and his given name ‘Weiwei’ can be converted into the word “future” by adding two small strokes to the second character.” 

For more on this weird but not inaccessible phenomenon, see the China Digital Times’ lexicon of Chinese terms used online.

Photo: The Atlantic