posts about or somewhat related to ‘hurricane’

New York City Subway, 86th Street
Via Stephen Dimmick.
UPDATE: via Elle Perez, “This is a low lying area in Brooklyn, which should be added to the caption.” After looking through a series of images (Google), and conferring with Jihii, whose beat was out there, it’s a Bay Ridge subway stop.

New York City Subway, 86th Street

Via Stephen Dimmick.

UPDATE: via Elle Perez, “This is a low lying area in Brooklyn, which should be added to the caption.” After looking through a series of images (Google), and conferring with Jihii, whose beat was out there, it’s a Bay Ridge subway stop.

Thanks to Sandy, Bye-Bye Paywalls

…for now.

via Poynter:

New York Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy confirmed by email that the news organization is suspending its paywall starting this afternoon, so that readers can get information about Hurricane Sandy.

“The gateway has been removed from the entire site and all apps. The plan is to keep it that way until the weather emergency is over,” Murphy said.

With the paywall in place, only digital and/or print subscribers can read beyond 10 articles. The Times suspended its paywall last year when Hurricane Irene threatened New York.

According to its third quarter earnings report released this past week, the Times has about 566,000 digital subscribers to nytimes.com and the International Herald Tribune. But thousands more will be closely following the storm as severe weather typically brings traffic surges to news websites.

Wall Street Journal Digital Network Managing Editor Raju Narisetti tweeted Sunday afternoon that all of wsj.com would be freely available starting Monday. Other newspapers have made similar announcements: The Boston Globe tweets its storm coverage is available free on Boston.com; The Baltimore Sun is dropping its wall; Newsday is also making its content available for free

FJP: Stay safe all, and happy reading.

Google Crisis Map: Sandy Edition

Embedded is Google.org’s Sandy Crisis Map with data pulled in from the US Naval Research Laboratory, the National Hurricane Center, the US Geological Survey and weather.com.

The pins show emergency shelter locations. 

Visit Google.org for a larger version, as well as the ability to filter the various data it’s pulling in.  

Sandy

Sandy

Irene Hyped? Not Compared to Others →

10: Rank of Hurricane Irene coverage by major news sources among all Atlantic Hurricanes since since 1980.

There’s been much discussion about whether Irene was overhyped. It’s true that from Friday through Sunday it seemed we were blanketed with every nuance about the storm but Nate Silver, the New York Times’ FiveThirtyEight blogger, digs into past coverage to gain some perspective.

What he discovers after a search through NewsLibrary.com, a database of news articles and transcripts, is that 2004’s Hurricane Ivan was the US media’s most covered storm. This is while the storm was actually taking place, not additional stories published about its aftermath. By comparison, Katrina comes in 14th place with fairly mundane coverage until the New Orleans levees actually broke.

Writes Silver:

It’s easy enough to conduct a series of searches on NewsLibrary.com in order to determine how much press coverage past Atlantic hurricanes have received. The only tricky part is that the further you go back in time, the fewer sources the database has available, so we’ll have to adjust for this.

We’ll accomplish this by creating a statistic which I’ll call the News Unit (or NU). This is defined by taking the total number of stories that mentioned the storm by name (for instance, “Hurricane Hugo” or “Tropical Storm Hugo”; either one is considered acceptable) and dividing by the average number of stories per day that were available in the NewsLibrary.com database during that period. I then multiply the result by 10 just to make things a little bit more legible — so essentially, a News Unit consists of one-tenth of all the stories published on a given day.

For instance, there were 13,326 stories published that used the term “Hurricane Gustav” or “Tropical Storm Gustav” during the period when that storm was active, from Aug. 25 through Sept. 4, 2008. And on average, there were 56,200 stories published per day during that period in the NewsLibrary.com database. Dividing 13,326 by 56,200, and then multiplying by 10, gives a result of 2.37. So Gustav produced 2.37 News Units worth of coverage while the storm was active.

Irene’s score by this measure is 2.25 News Units, which is on the high side but not extraordinary.

Specifically, it ranks 10th from among the 92 named tropical cyclones that made landfall in the United States since 1980.

This, of course, is just a raw measurement of how many news stories there were. For thoughts about what hype actually is, see Julie Moos’ article at Poynter: The 6 criteria for hype & why Hurricane Irene coverage does not meet them.

Well, give us a few points for trying.

We left New York for the more storm friendly confines of where we grew up in Narragansett, Rhode Island with the thought that we’d get some good hurricane tropical storm footage.

It started off well at the spot you see in the video above but as we moved up the beach (as in literally trying to outrun waves in a sprint down the beach to get to our spot), we were taken out by a biggie and our camera died.

Problem was were running past a sea wall to get back into open space when a wave came in. It was large and we got rolled 

So, we’re left with a mere minute of the Rhode Island coast line. 

But it’s a pretty good minute. 

And the attempt was great fun.

(Fun times aside: We — that’s my brother Peter in the video — grew up on this beach, know this beach, know these waters, know these waves and have swum these waves during past hurricane equivalents all our lives. If we had been anywhere else and not known the terrain, the currents, the ocean, there’s no way we would have run the beach to get a shot, and certainly would tell others not to do it as well.)

Irene from the International Space Station
Via NASA:

An Expedition 28 crew member aboard the International Space Station captured this image of Hurricane Irene off the east coast of the United States on Friday, August 26, 2011, around 4:30 p.m. EDT (8:30 p.m. GMT).

Irene from the International Space Station

Via NASA:

An Expedition 28 crew member aboard the International Space Station captured this image of Hurricane Irene off the east coast of the United States on Friday, August 26, 2011, around 4:30 p.m. EDT (8:30 p.m. GMT).

Irene Makes Landfall in North Carolina
Via NASA:

The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene on August 27, 2011 at 10:10 a.m. EDT after it made landfall at 8 a.m. in Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Irene’s outer bands had already extended into New England. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project.
From 22,300 miles in space, Hurricane Irene looks serene and impressive. That’s how NOAA’s GOES satellite sees Irene today as it batters the eastern U.S. coastline, but it’s quite a different story on the ground.

Irene Makes Landfall in North Carolina

Via NASA:

The GOES-13 satellite saw Hurricane Irene on August 27, 2011 at 10:10 a.m. EDT after it made landfall at 8 a.m. in Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Irene’s outer bands had already extended into New England. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project.

From 22,300 miles in space, Hurricane Irene looks serene and impressive. That’s how NOAA’s GOES satellite sees Irene today as it batters the eastern U.S. coastline, but it’s quite a different story on the ground.

shortformblog:

Hurricane Irene path: Google just threw up a pretty useful hurricane-tracker tool to follow Irene. (Here’s the article they wrote about the tool, which lets you sort between a number of different metrics.) The giant cloud imagery really puts the hurricane in sharp contrast. Currently engulfed by the storm? North Carolina. Virginia Beach is next. DC and Baltimore will miss the worst of it (though us DC folks got nailed by a heavy ten-minute storm about three hours ago). Philly, NJ and NYC are directly in the path, particularly Long Island.

Team FJP took a road trip from New York to Rhode Island.Current forecast: Large waves, bright sun and fantastic.But we have a camera to shoot what might be going on here.And we do expect a dramatic change tomorrow afternoon.

shortformblog:

Hurricane Irene path: Google just threw up a pretty useful hurricane-tracker tool to follow Irene. (Here’s the article they wrote about the tool, which lets you sort between a number of different metrics.) The giant cloud imagery really puts the hurricane in sharp contrast. Currently engulfed by the storm? North Carolina. Virginia Beach is next. DC and Baltimore will miss the worst of it (though us DC folks got nailed by a heavy ten-minute storm about three hours ago). Philly, NJ and NYC are directly in the path, particularly Long Island.

Team FJP took a road trip from New York to Rhode Island.

Current forecast: Large waves, bright sun and fantastic.

But we have a camera to shoot what might be going on here.

And we do expect a dramatic change tomorrow afternoon.

(via shortformblog)

Hello, Irene.

Hello, Irene.