Posts tagged with ‘iOS’

This Little-Known iOS Feature Will Change the Way We Connect | Gadget Lab | WIRED →

If “Multipeer Connectivity Framework” and “mesh networking” sound like complicated technologies from the future, it’s because they kind of are (from the future!!! okay, kidding). But they’re not as complicated as they may sound. The app developers behind the new Firechat are harnessing this new technology from Apple to allow iOS device users to find and connect to one another - and then anonymously communicate - all without needing cellular service or WiFi. 

There are numerous reasons this technology could have huge, revolutionary impacts if its successful. While Firechat is now just for exchanging messages and photos, mesh networking could open up the possibilities of a completely independent network for communicating anonymously and privately, sharing files and storing data, and even reaching out from places with limited internet access (think crisis areas, crowded conventions). The implications from this technology would completely disrupt the current cellular service provider system. 

Apple World Wide Developer’s Conference Typo

Filed under: What’s in an apostrophe.

Via The Verge:

Apple’s marathon keynote session at yesterday’s WWDC began with the following video. Graced by soothing piano music, a minimalist monochromatic palette, and a set of elegantly transitioning geometric shapes, the ad does a great job of conveying Apple lead designer Jony Ive’s pursuit of purity and simplicity in design. There’s only one small problem with it: when the onscreen narrative declares that “there are a thousand no’s for every yes,” it inserts an apostrophe where one does not belong.

Whether you consult the Oxford English Dictionary, The Chicago Manual of Style, or Dictionary.com, you’ll find the acceptable plural forms of “no” to be “noes” or “nos.” Apple’s unnecessary use of punctuation proves to be a rather ironic answer to the company’s own rhetorical challenge: “How can anyone perfect anything?”

FJP: If this tickles you, you might also enjoy The 7 Most Disastrous Typos of All Time.

Learning to Finger Paint

Last weekend I bought Brushes, a digital finger painting app for iOS devices created by Taptrix.

While my drawing talents haven’t improved much since the second or third grade, I thought finger painting would be a great way to occupy my daily subway rides. Besides, there’s aspiration going on here: Jorge Colombo created five New Yorker covers using the app.

Here’s some general background: Brushes, as the name suggests, is a painting app that uses brushes. If you’ve used Photoshop, they’re the exact same thing. The app has 19 different ones and you can change each one’s size and overall style with some sliders that give you overall control.

Importantly, the app also uses layers so you can draw on top and underneath objects. The layers aren’t limitless so you end up using a few and then merging them when you have the need to move on to a different part of your picture.

Other essentials include a color picker, paint bucket for large fills, and opacity and brush size control. The eraser is handy and the history and redo controls are image saving.

So, a few days into my drawing with Brushes extravaganza, here’s what I’ve discovered:

  • My fingers are fat, maybe a little too fat: I’m using Brushes on an iPad and while I can zoom in on specific parts of an image to work on a detail, and am getting more facile with this the more I use it, I’m thinking of getting a stylus.
  • Drawing on an iPad in the subway is a great conversation starter: four or five people have come up to me over the past few days and asked about the app.
  • I need to practice more: I’m finding this very addictive so this shouldn’t be a problem.

If you want to see how people are using Brushes, and what its potential is, check the Flickr user group. And if vector’s more your thing, Taptrix has another iOS app called Inkpad.

Images: Chickens are People Too, by me (Michael Cervieri); various screenshots of the Brushes app showing layers, color pickers, and brush types.

What CNN Can Learn From Buying Zite →

CNN just bought Zite, the magazine-style iPad newsreader, for a reported $20 million.

So what’s in it for them?

Writes Matthew Ingram at GigaOm:

The media conglomerate says it plans to leave Zite alone and doesn’t want to integrate it into its existing assets, or clog up the app by forcing CNN content into it — something Zite CEO Mark Johnson promises won’t happen either. So what is the purpose of buying the app at all then? If CNN is smart, watching what happens inside Zite could give it something that all media companies are in desperate need of, whether they know it or not: real-time insights into what people really want to read about, instead of what CNN editors think they want to read about.

Publishers Doing an Apple End-Run to Deliver to iPad | PBS →

2105:

Major publishers are starting to deliver content to the iPad outside Apple’s App Store, avoiding the company’s rules and restrictions that limit what they can do and how much they can earn.

Instead of building native apps in iOS, the proprietary operating system for the iPad and other Apple devices, the publishers are using HTML5, the latest version of the open-source HTMLlanguage used to build web pages.

This is a key flashpoint in the continued struggle for control of, and access to, users and their money on the iPad and other platforms. It’s also a battleground in the fight over whether to use open or closed standards in media and technology.

Via the always awesome (and always colon’d) @rogerblack.

FJP: Not quite as aesthetically sexy but HTML5 is — and is going to be — fab.

(Source: journo-geekery)

Developers on Google, Apple, Mobile & Social →

A few weeks ago Appcelerator and IDC surveyed over 2,000 developers about their mobile priorities, Google and Apple’s consolidation of mobile, and the integration of social into mobile apps. The results have been released in the 2011 Appcelerator/IDC Mobile Developer Report. 

Some key takeaways:

  • Two-thirds of respondents believe that Google can catch up to Facebook in social with Google+. When asked why, 68% of developers say that leveraging Google’s assets (eg: Search, YouTube, Maps, etc) trumps Facebook’s social graph lead. 49% say that Google shows more innovation than Facebook with new Google+ features like circles, sparks, hangouts, etc.
  • While Google+ may be the future, today 83% of developers using social in their apps say they use or are planning to use Facebook this year. Twitter is second at 73%, followed closely by Google+ (when API is released) at 72%, LinkedIn at 30%, and Foursquare at 23%.
  • When asked what social capabilities are most important in their apps, developers said that features that encourage repeat usage and offer fresh content are more important than location checkins and photo sharing. In order of priority, developers use social for: notifications (52%), status updates (49%), login/identity (44%), messaging (38%), news (35%), location sharing (32%), photo sharing (31%), and friend requests (26%).
  • With relatively few new product announcements this past quarter, platform priorities haven’t changed significantly. iPhone remains tops as 91% say they are ‘very interested’ in developing for the device. iPad is number two at 88%, Android pulled up a couple points with Android phone interest climbing to 87% from 85% last quarter and Android Tablets rose back to Q1 levels to 74%. We added HTML5 mobile web as a new option to rank this quarter, which comes in fifth at 66%. The second tier remains the same: Windows Phone (30%), BlackBerry phones (28%), BlackBerry Playbook (20%), HP TouchPad (18%), HP Palm Pre/Pixi (12%), Symbian (7%), and MeeGo (5%) rounding out the list. The new addition of mobile web in the middle of the pack suggests developers are seeing the increasing requirement for both a mobile app and mobile website, though the former continues to be the number one priority.

The report is available for download here.

Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread and now Honeycomb: these are the tasty names Google has given to Android releases since acquiring Android, Inc. in August 2005.
The platform’s gone bonkers in the mobile space ever since with a Nielsen report out today that says the Android OS has a 39 percent share of the US smartphone market. By comparison, Apple’s iOS has a 28 percent market share.
Android’s success is driven by that fact that much of the software stack it includes is released under an open source license, allowing phone makers to take it, augment it for their purposes and get to market.
So what about Honeycomb, the May release sepcifically optimized for tablets and large screen devices? Will Honeycomb do the same for tablets that its earlier flavors did for smartphones? 
Analysts don’t really think so. As John Gruber writes, unlike the iPhone which entered a crowded mobile market and fought for market share, the iPad created the tablet market.
Think tablets and you’re basically thinking iPad.
It will be tough for Android, or any other OS, to disrupt that mindshare.
Image: Detail from The Android Story by [x]cube Labs.

Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread and now Honeycomb: these are the tasty names Google has given to Android releases since acquiring Android, Inc. in August 2005.

The platform’s gone bonkers in the mobile space ever since with a Nielsen report out today that says the Android OS has a 39 percent share of the US smartphone market. By comparison, Apple’s iOS has a 28 percent market share.

Android’s success is driven by that fact that much of the software stack it includes is released under an open source license, allowing phone makers to take it, augment it for their purposes and get to market.

So what about Honeycomb, the May release sepcifically optimized for tablets and large screen devices? Will Honeycomb do the same for tablets that its earlier flavors did for smartphones? 

Analysts don’t really think so. As John Gruber writes, unlike the iPhone which entered a crowded mobile market and fought for market share, the iPad created the tablet market.

Think tablets and you’re basically thinking iPad.

It will be tough for Android, or any other OS, to disrupt that mindshare.

Image: Detail from The Android Story by [x]cube Labs.

Google+ Comes to the iPhone with support for Circles, the Stream and Huddles
You can download the free app here.
And if you want to connect, you’ll find me (Michael) here, Chikodi here, Chao here, Dave here, Peter here and Daedalus here.  

Google+ Comes to the iPhone with support for Circles, the Stream and Huddles

You can download the free app here.

And if you want to connect, you’ll find me (Michael) here, Chikodi here, Chao here, Dave here, Peter here and Daedalus here.  

Less than Half of the Internet’s Top 500 Sites are Optimized for Mobile Devices
Via ReadWriteWeb:

In a study 500 of some of the top sites on the Internet, mobile performance consultants Blaze found less than half of the top destinations in the United States were optimized for smartphones
Of the Alexa 500 top sites in the U.S., 40% were optimized for smartphones (42% iOS, 38% Android). Yet, when it comes to Android, those 200 sites overwhelmingly returned the same page to both a smartphone and a tablet, meaning that developers have not rendered Android specific versions of their sites for Android tablets

What is this, 2008?

Less than Half of the Internet’s Top 500 Sites are Optimized for Mobile Devices

Via ReadWriteWeb:

In a study 500 of some of the top sites on the Internet, mobile performance consultants Blaze found less than half of the top destinations in the United States were optimized for smartphones

Of the Alexa 500 top sites in the U.S., 40% were optimized for smartphones (42% iOS, 38% Android). Yet, when it comes to Android, those 200 sites overwhelmingly returned the same page to both a smartphone and a tablet, meaning that developers have not rendered Android specific versions of their sites for Android tablets

What is this, 2008?

Nielsen released numbers today showing that the US mobile operating system have more or less stabilized with Android leading the way at 36% market penetration followed by iOS (26%), RIM (23%) and then the rest.
Interesting to note — and illustrated above — Android users are the most data hungry, consuming over 580 megabytes per month.

Nielsen released numbers today showing that the US mobile operating system have more or less stabilized with Android leading the way at 36% market penetration followed by iOS (26%), RIM (23%) and then the rest.

Interesting to note — and illustrated above — Android users are the most data hungry, consuming over 580 megabytes per month.

Englishman in New York

Phrase books are essential for the traveling journalist. They help you eat, they help you break the ice, they help you communicate.

Google’s released a new app that might make them obsolete. The company’s just released the Google Translate mobile app for iOS and Android. It not only lets you enter text, but you can also speak into it and have it speak back a translation. Not bad when you want to order a bowl of soup.

Those who use Google Voice will recognize the sometimes garbled output when simple English to English transcription is employed but check it out. It’s a great, and free, start.

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.
The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.
The Argument: 

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…
…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.
It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”. 

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry

The Plaintiff: Miller Medeiros, a NYC-based designer/developer by way of Brazil.

The Claim: The iPad is the new IE6.

The Argument:

Since last year with all the hype around HTML5 and the buzz about “how HTML5 is going to save the web” and that “flash is dead”, etc… A lot of people started to believe that HTML5 is ready for production and that it is more stable and have better performance than Flash… Since the beginning I’ve been saying to everyone that it isn’t true and it won’t be for a long time. Why not? because every single platform has bugs, and it takes years to find, document and fix all of them, and more complex systems have more room for problems… – Browsers don’t even support all the CSS 2.1 features that I read about on specs and blogs around 5 years ago…

…I’m saying that the iPad is the new IE6 because we are expecting it to be something that it isn’t, the same way that we were expecting that IE6 would have the same features/performance/reliability than the latest versions of Firefox/Safari. It takes years and many iterations to a technology become “stable”, early adoption of standards and poor implementation leads to headaches. It happened with IE6 and it is happening with the iOS Safari right now.

It took years for the community to learn how to deal with IE6 and to solve many bugs, the “problem” nowadays is that the release cycle of the browsers is so short and there are so few people doing this kind of things that the solutions for most problems may come “too late”.

The Verdict: True, but we never liked IE6 to begin with and the iPad is well, you know, sexy. Just stay far away from the crazies who think a device will save an industry