Posts tagged with ‘immigration’

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

Reporting Immigration, Population and the US Census
The US population grew to just over 316 million in 2013, according to the Census Bureau, which released its population numbers Monday. This is up from 313.8 million in 2012.
With the release of the data, news organizations are giving things a local spin. Take, for example, Florida closing in on New York as the country’s third most populous state; Utah as the country’s second fastest growing state; or Pennsylvania as one of the country’s slowest growing states.
In New York City, the talk is about how diverse the population is, with 37.2% of the population foreign-born.
Via WNYC:

The city’s foreign-born population has crossed the 3 million mark, a figure without precedent in municipal history and indicative of a decades-long metamorphosis of New York’s character.

If you have yourself some minutes, listen to this segment from the Brian Lehrer Show on New New Yorkers.
If you like to play with data, you can download the Census information here.
Image: Screenshot, Top 10 Immigrant Groups in Woodside, Queens, via NYC.gov’s Where are New York City’s Immigrants/Top Groups Living?

Reporting Immigration, Population and the US Census

The US population grew to just over 316 million in 2013, according to the Census Bureau, which released its population numbers Monday. This is up from 313.8 million in 2012.

With the release of the data, news organizations are giving things a local spin. Take, for example, Florida closing in on New York as the country’s third most populous state; Utah as the country’s second fastest growing state; or Pennsylvania as one of the country’s slowest growing states.

In New York City, the talk is about how diverse the population is, with 37.2% of the population foreign-born.

Via WNYC:

The city’s foreign-born population has crossed the 3 million mark, a figure without precedent in municipal history and indicative of a decades-long metamorphosis of New York’s character.

If you have yourself some minutes, listen to this segment from the Brian Lehrer Show on New New Yorkers.

If you like to play with data, you can download the Census information here.

Image: Screenshot, Top 10 Immigrant Groups in Woodside, Queens, via NYC.gov’s Where are New York City’s Immigrants/Top Groups Living?

Do not use illegal as a noun, and avoid the sinister-sounding alien.

A new entry in The New York Times’ stylebook on “illegal immigrant”.

Background:

On Tuesday afternoon, a group of advocates against the use of the term “illegal immigrant” gathered outside The New York Times building in Times Square to deliver a petition of protest. Organizers said the petition, which asked the paper to stop using the phrase contained more than 70,000 signatures collected online.

And here is the new entry, (by way of Poynter, if you’re looking for context):

illegal immigrant may be used to describe someone who enters, lives in or works in the United States without proper legal authorization. But be aware that in the debate over immigration, some people view it as loaded or offensive. Without taking sides or resorting to euphemism, consider alternatives when appropriate to explain the specific circumstances of the person in question, or to focus on actions: who crossed the border illegallywho overstayed a visawho is not authorized to work in this country.

Unauthorized is also an acceptable description, though it has a bureaucratic tone. Undocumented is the term preferred by many immigrants and their advocates, but it has a flavor of euphemism and should be used with caution outside quotations. Illegal immigration, because it describes the issue rather than an individual, is less likely thanillegal immigrant to be seen as troubling.

Take particular care in describing people whose immigration status is complex or subject to change – for example, young people brought to this country as children, many of whom are eligible for temporary reprieves from deportation under federal policies adopted in 2012.

Do not use illegal as a noun, and avoid the sinister-sounding alien.

Readers Capture the Complexity of the US-Mexican Border

fjp-latinamerica:

What does life look like along the 2,000 miles of the US-Mexico border?

The New York Times crowdsourced reader photos, from the intimate to the aerial, to tell the visual story. 

FJP: One of the best crowdsourced interactive features we’ve seen in a long time. Yet, you will need more than a thousand pictures to really grasp what exactly is going on along the US-Mexico border, one of the busiest in the world. And, as you most certainly know, it is not only about Tijuana anymore, but about a long series of bordertowns than span all the way East until the Rio Grande Valley.

H/T: Propublica.

The Stylebook no longer sanctions the term “illegal immigrant” or the use of “illegal” to describe a person. Instead, it tells users that “illegal” should describe only an action, such as living in or immigrating to a country illegally.

Associated Press, in a post about its changes to “illegal immigration” and labels used to describe mental health issues in the AP Stylebook. ‘Illegal immigrant’ no more.

Via Slate:

This is a victory by activists who you may never have paid attention to. For more than two years, the writer and reporter Jose Antonio Vargas—who discovered in his teenage years that he had come to the United States illegally from the Phillippines—has been on a crusade to literally “define ‘American.’” One of his slogans and causes was “no human being is illegal.”

FJP: The AP’s Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll explains in the post that the changes reflect the evolution of the English language. 

UPDATE: The New York Times is considering removing the term “Illegal Immigrant” as well.

Faces of Deportation
The New York Time Lens Blog is carrying “Detained, Deported and Determined,” a photo essay by Getty photographer John Moore.
In an accompanying article, Moore writes:

During President Obama’s first term of office, authorities deported a record 1.5 million people. A majority fell into several categories — those who had recently crossed United States borders illegally, repeat violators of immigration laws and those with a criminal record, according to the White House.
I have photographed this stark ritual often in the last few years. But in the United States, law enforcement restrictions that photojournalists not show the faces of immigrants in their custody has made it hard, at times, to humanize the images.
So, on this last trip to Arizona, the challenge for me was to find deported — or soon-to-be-deported — immigrants not in federal custody.

Moore did so by going to the San Juan Bosco shelter in Nogales, Mexico and to Maricopa County in Arizona.
Image: Gilbert Mendez, 28, arrested for driving without a license and deported. Mendez claims he worked for five years as a farm laborer in Washington State and plans to try to get back into the United States. By John Moore via The New York Times.

Faces of Deportation

The New York Time Lens Blog is carrying “Detained, Deported and Determined,” a photo essay by Getty photographer John Moore.

In an accompanying article, Moore writes:

During President Obama’s first term of office, authorities deported a record 1.5 million people. A majority fell into several categories — those who had recently crossed United States borders illegally, repeat violators of immigration laws and those with a criminal record, according to the White House.

I have photographed this stark ritual often in the last few years. But in the United States, law enforcement restrictions that photojournalists not show the faces of immigrants in their custody has made it hard, at times, to humanize the images.

So, on this last trip to Arizona, the challenge for me was to find deported — or soon-to-be-deported — immigrants not in federal custody.

Moore did so by going to the San Juan Bosco shelter in Nogales, Mexico and to Maricopa County in Arizona.

Image: Gilbert Mendez, 28, arrested for driving without a license and deported. Mendez claims he worked for five years as a farm laborer in Washington State and plans to try to get back into the United States. By John Moore via The New York Times.

New eBook on the coverage of migration in the Americas
fjp-latinamerica:

The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin just released a report from their 2011 Forum on Journalism in the Americas, in an eBook format. The report can be downloaded for free from the center’s Digital Library, in both English and Español.
Definitely a good and relevant read. Here is a brief quote from the Introduction chapter: 

The Forum participants – reporters, editors, academics, leaders of journalism and civil society organizations and experts – acknowledged that migration is one of the most complex of human stories. Against the backdrop of globalization in every sphere of our lives, it will only become more prominent as time goes on. Despite this, journalistic resources are lacking to provide good quality coverage of international migration in the Americas.
Journalists and experts spelled out what needs to be done. They looked into ways to collaborate across countries. They recommended a more human, balanced portrayal, going beyond the statistics and anecdotes of people crossing borders with or without papers. More stories need to be written about the migrants themselves, their families, historical explanations for migration, investigations into government policies, health issues, economic and social factors, education, housing and myriad other components that make up migration. In short, about the ways that migration has an important, if not crucial, effect on the daily life of almost everyone in the Americas.

Image: Partial screenshot of the UT Knight Center’s homepage.

New eBook on the coverage of migration in the Americas

fjp-latinamerica:

The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin just released a report from their 2011 Forum on Journalism in the Americas, in an eBook format. The report can be downloaded for free from the center’s Digital Library, in both English and Español.

Definitely a good and relevant read. Here is a brief quote from the Introduction chapter: 

The Forum participants – reporters, editors, academics, leaders of journalism and civil society organizations and experts – acknowledged that migration is one of the most complex of human stories. Against the backdrop of globalization in every sphere of our lives, it will only become more prominent as time goes on. Despite this, journalistic resources are lacking to provide good quality coverage of international migration in the Americas.

Journalists and experts spelled out what needs to be done. They looked into ways to collaborate across countries. They recommended a more human, balanced portrayal, going beyond the statistics and anecdotes of people crossing borders with or without papers. More stories need to be written about the migrants themselves, their families, historical explanations for migration, investigations into government policies, health issues, economic and social factors, education, housing and myriad other components that make up migration. In short, about the ways that migration has an important, if not crucial, effect on the daily life of almost everyone in the Americas.

Image: Partial screenshot of the UT Knight Center’s homepage.

Will Journalist Face Deportation? Signs Point To 'No' →

By Corey Dade for NPR… A story following the news that Pulitzer-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas is an undocumented, or illegal immigrant.

I decided then that if I was to succeed in a profession that is all about truth-telling, I couldn’t tell the truth about myself.

While Steve Myers acknowledges the legitimacy of Jose Antonio Vargas’ recent decision to out himself as an illegal immigrant, he explores how a journalist withholding information affects journalism. The article asks the question, “when is truth telling worth the risk?”

For a somewhat related take, Slate’s Jack Shafer explores the honesty needed between a reporter and editor and suggests that Vargas’ deception over the years destroys that, as well as the trust needed between a news organization and its readers. 

Steve Myers, Poynter. "Vargas’ revelation may be a victory for immigration advocates, but not for journalism."