Posts tagged with ‘info’

We noted the other day that 57 journalists were killed in 2010, according to Reporters Without Borders.
The Committee to Protect Journalists has created an interactive that explores the motivation behind the killings. Thus far they’ve identified 44 journalists whose deaths they can attribute to cause.

We noted the other day that 57 journalists were killed in 2010, according to Reporters Without Borders.

The Committee to Protect Journalists has created an interactive that explores the motivation behind the killings. Thus far they’ve identified 44 journalists whose deaths they can attribute to cause.

If RSS isn’t saved now, if browser vendors don’t realise the potential of RSS to save users a whole bunch of time and make the web better for them, then the alternative is that I will have to have a Facebook account, or a Twitter account, or some such corporate-controlled identity, where I have to “Like” or “Follow” every website’s partner account that I’m interested in, and then have to deal with the privacy violations and problems related with corporate owned identity owning a list of every website I’m interested in (and wanting to monetise that list), and they, and every website I’m interested in, knowing every other website I’m interested in following, and then I have to log in and check this corporate owned identity every day in order to find out what’s new on other websites, whilst I’m advertised to, because they are only interested in making the biggest and the best walled garden that I can’t leave.
Via Jonathan Stray:

This is a picture of the 11,616 SIGACT (“significant action”) reports from December 2006, the bloodiest month of the war. Each report is a dot. Each dot is labelled by the three most “characteristic” words in that report. Documents that are “similar” have edges drawn between them. The location of the dot is abstract, and has nothing to do with geography. Instead, dots with edges between them are pulled closer together. This produces a series of clusters, which are labelled by the words that are most “characteristic” of the reports in that cluster. 

A biggie version of this image — along with image details and explanations — is available with the original post.

Via Jonathan Stray:

This is a picture of the 11,616 SIGACT (“significant action”) reports from December 2006, the bloodiest month of the war. Each report is a dot. Each dot is labelled by the three most “characteristic” words in that report. Documents that are “similar” have edges drawn between them. The location of the dot is abstract, and has nothing to do with geography. Instead, dots with edges between them are pulled closer together. This produces a series of clusters, which are labelled by the words that are most “characteristic” of the reports in that cluster.

A biggie version of this image — along with image details and explanations — is available with the original post.