Posts tagged with ‘instagram’

American History: Now in Color! 

In An American Odyssey, published by Taschen, you can now see striking color photographs of the U.S. that predated autochrome photography by almost 20 years.

All of the postcard images are curated from the private collection of Marc Walter, the early results of a photolithographic process — something Wired dubbed “what Instagram would have looked like in the 1800s” because of the surreal, dreamlike quality of the photochroms’ colorings.

On the unique process:

Photochrom photographers would start the process by coating a printing plate with a light-sensitive emulsion and then exposing a glass plate photo negative onto it. Unlike modern four-color printing process that can represent millions of colors by overlapping tiny dots of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black ink, the inks mixed for Photochroms were mixed by hand in an attempt to perfectly match the yellow-green sunblasted scrub brush that surrounds the Grand Canyon or the aquamarine ocean water of the Bahamas. The photographers would erase the entire plate except for the area reserved for that specific color and make 10-15 more plates to fill out the composition. Photographic details were preserved, but an emotive, if slightly artificial, range of color was added.

Bonus: Learn more about the coloring process, history, and more over at the helpful FAQ by Taschen.

Images: “A Monday Washing, New York” and the cover of the new volume by Marc Walter and Sabine Arqué, a collection that spans from 1888-1924 from the Detroit Photographic Company, courtesy of Taschen books. 

There’s a term for this. Social psychologists, journalists and social-media users call it “lifestyle envy,” or Instagram envy, and savvy smartphone users are well-acquainted with its tell-tale sign: the little pang you get when a friend posts photos from his or her swanky vacation in Istanbul, or when actress Mindy Kaling snaps her newest pair of spike-toe Christian Louboutain pumps.

Lane Anderson in The Instagram Effect: How the Psychology of Envy Drives ConsumerismDeseret News.

The piece is part of a series called The Ten Today, which examines the relevance of the 10 Commandments in contemporary society. It’s kind of a a fascinating endeavor. The publication, which, as Nieman Lab reports, just came out of beta, is fascinating in itself:

The Deseret News is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but you might not detect its Mormon roots from looking at the outlet’s national site — officially came out of beta yesterday — which focuses on the self-proclaimed values of family and faith. Even in its faith section, which includes stories as wide ranging as a preview of a new PBS documentary on the history of the Jews and a piece on the Hindu holiday of Holi, there’s very little explicit coverage of Mormonism.

FJP: So most of the articles (see: popular content, for example) comes out of a set of curious, general-interesty questions about American society and the role that spirituality and family plays out in our daily lives. While most new news projects are following the niche-news-serving-narrow-interests trend, it’s an interesting ambition to keep an eye on: a publication aiming to hit such a broad audience and broad set of topics topics from a strangely narrow space. —Jihii

All About the #Selfies
Via Wired:

Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category…
…In its short lifespan, the selfie has gone from pop culture phenomenon to academic lab rat. For obvious reasons, these photos are a psychological research goldmine, but there’s been little done in the way of objectively looking at the photos’ content to see how it might reflect the actual world we live in. Selfiecity looks at the trend through a window, not a microscope. Instead of zeroing in on a single narrow element, the Selfiecity project is broken down into a few broad areas: main findings, contextual essays and interactive data visualizations. “We wanted to look at this phenomena from different perspectives,” Manovich explains.
Selfiecity analyzes Instagram data for visual cues like head position, emotional expression, gender and age, in order to get a clearer picture of how (and how often) people actually take selfies in different cultures. “The idea was to confront the generalizations about selfies, which are not based on data, with actual data,” says Manovich. “We wanted to look at what the actual patterns are.”

So, check Selfiecity, it’s mesmerizing.
And then, perhaps, check #SELFIE (Official Music Video), a techno ode to all things selfie, crowdsourced “from so many amazing and funny ppl.”
Image: Selfies in New York, via Wired.

All About the #Selfies

Via Wired:

Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category…

…In its short lifespan, the selfie has gone from pop culture phenomenon to academic lab rat. For obvious reasons, these photos are a psychological research goldmine, but there’s been little done in the way of objectively looking at the photos’ content to see how it might reflect the actual world we live in. Selfiecity looks at the trend through a window, not a microscope. Instead of zeroing in on a single narrow element, the Selfiecity project is broken down into a few broad areas: main findings, contextual essays and interactive data visualizations. “We wanted to look at this phenomena from different perspectives,” Manovich explains.

Selfiecity analyzes Instagram data for visual cues like head position, emotional expression, gender and age, in order to get a clearer picture of how (and how often) people actually take selfies in different cultures. “The idea was to confront the generalizations about selfies, which are not based on data, with actual data,” says Manovich. “We wanted to look at what the actual patterns are.”

So, check Selfiecity, it’s mesmerizing.

And then, perhaps, check #SELFIE (Official Music Video), a techno ode to all things selfie, crowdsourced “from so many amazing and funny ppl.”

Image: Selfies in New York, via Wired.

It’s also possible that we actively opt not to pay much attention to the scenes we capture, because we’re counting on photos to record everything so we don’t mentally have to. If that’s the case, that would mean that you’re farming out your memory to Instagram as you move through the world.

Emily Badger, How Instagram Alters Your Memory, The Atlantic Cities.

To test this, Henkel, a researcher at Fairfield University, concocted a series of experiments leading undergraduate students on guided tours through the university’s Bellarmine Museum of Art. They looked at paintings, sculptures, pottery, jewelry and mosaics. The students were given digital cameras to photograph some of the objects and were told to simply observe the others. The next day, they were given a series of recall tests, trying to detect which objects they remembered best in name and detail.

As it turned out, people remembered fewer of the photographed objects, and fewer of the details about them, relative to the pieces of art they’d actively observed with their own eyes.

…There was one catch in Henkel’s findings: She also asked participants to zoom in on and photograph the details of some of these art pieces. And people who did that were much better at remembering the works of art that those who simply wedged entire objects into one frame and then walked away. Perhaps, by focusing consciously on the details, we can cut back on some of this “photo-taking impairment effect.”

Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea
via Just Something:

David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.
He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.
The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

Check them all out here.
Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea

via Just Something:

David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.

He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.

The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

Check them all out here.

Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

Can You Defame Someone on Instagram?
Famous rapper The Game is being sued by his former babysitter, Karen Monroe, for defamation on Instagram. Monroe claims her reputation was damaged after the star—who has over 1 million followers on the platform—posted several rants about her on his account. One particular post featured her image overlaid with the caption: ”Beware if this person is watching your children, she is a very dangerous baby sitter.” She says she can no longer find work in the industry and has received death threats.
Via the Digital Media Law Project:

In order to succeed on her defamation claim under California law, Monroe will have to prove that The Game’s published statements were false; unprivileged; have a natural tendency to injure or cause “special damage;” and that The Game’s fault in publishing the statement amounts to at least negligence. Although Instagram’s Terms of Use state that users “must not defame” under Section 6 of its Basic Terms, it remains to be seen whether Monroe can succeed on her defamation claim in California court.

Though stars have previously gotten in trouble for airing dirty laundry on social media, this seems to be the first time someone has been sued for their activity on Instagram.
Read more about the case here or check out the Digital Media Law Project’s summary of legal questions currently on Instagram’s radar.
Image: Phone screenshot of The Game’s Instagram feed, which often showcases his adorable daughter.

Can You Defame Someone on Instagram?

Famous rapper The Game is being sued by his former babysitter, Karen Monroe, for defamation on Instagram. Monroe claims her reputation was damaged after the star—who has over 1 million followers on the platform—posted several rants about her on his account. One particular post featured her image overlaid with the caption: ”Beware if this person is watching your children, she is a very dangerous baby sitter.” She says she can no longer find work in the industry and has received death threats.

Via the Digital Media Law Project:

In order to succeed on her defamation claim under California law, Monroe will have to prove that The Game’s published statements were false; unprivileged; have a natural tendency to injure or cause “special damage;” and that The Game’s fault in publishing the statement amounts to at least negligence. Although Instagram’s Terms of Use state that users “must not defame” under Section 6 of its Basic Terms, it remains to be seen whether Monroe can succeed on her defamation claim in California court.

Though stars have previously gotten in trouble for airing dirty laundry on social media, this seems to be the first time someone has been sued for their activity on Instagram.

Read more about the case here or check out the Digital Media Law Project’s summary of legal questions currently on Instagram’s radar.

Image: Phone screenshot of The Game’s Instagram feed, which often showcases his adorable daughter.

shortformblog:

So NowThisNews has an Instagram channel, and while they’ve been shooting a lot of video over this way, yesterday they posted something pretty mind-blowing. Here’s an Instagram infographic about civilian casualties in Afghanistan which is at once informative and well-produced. They’ve packed a lot into 15 seconds.

Funny Social Media Accounts

Behold! An FJP round up of five hilarious social media accounts that are worth a gander:

1. The new YouTube channel, FaceMashups, digitally merges celebrity bodies, faces, and voices together to create bizarre interview segments.

2. Photographer, Flora Borsi, photoshops herself into old photographs to make it look like she’s taking pictures of past events with her cell phone. View the Facebook album here.

3. Twitter user, @YouSoPretentious, takes pictures of handwritten notes that make fun of typical social media photos and posts them to the Instagram account, Satiregram. The notes say things like, “An attempt at being artsy by taking short clips of nature and the sky. How nice,” “A BLT from a local diner,” and “Oh, look. Another picture of a cat.” 

4. The Twitter account, @FakeAPStyleBook posts ridiculous tips for “proper writing,” and pokes fun at AP Style with tweets like “Today we will be publishing a list of words you should no longer use in any publication. Adjust style books accordingly.”

5. YouTuber, Dom Mazzetti, hosts BroScienceLife, a channel featuring what he calls “Bro Science,” — ”lifting advice from an unqualified bro who looks like he works out.” Each week Mazzetti plays the role of a bro (a male who typically loves to party and talk about going to the gym) and chooses a new “bro-topic” to make fun of. 

Video: Will Ferrell & Natalie Portman’s FaceMashUp

It’s no accident Facebook made Instagram’s new videos exactly as long as a television commercial →

Which, according to Quartz, is a strategic move:

FJP: Interesting take. 15 seconds does feel a bit long for the Instagram attention span. Here’s a Digiday round-up of reactions to Instagram video.

When People Are Likable in Person, But Not Online

Blimey Cow’s I Like You in Real Life But Not on The Internet describes how people can seem pleasant in real life, while being totally obnoxious online. Some behaviors that contribute to a person’s annoying Net-personality include bombarding social media sites with “selfies,” posting live sports updates when nobody cares about a game, and “compragging” (complain-bragging) about your life in status updates.

FJP: If you can relate and just can’t bear reading another one of your friend’s  tweets about how she’s watching the third season of Mad Men for the eighth time, you might consider trying 35 Activities That Don’t Involve Staring at a Screen

photojojo:

Still unsure of “phoneography” having a place in the professional sphere? On March 31, 2013, The New York Times used an Instagram shot for the front page cover story.

Granted, it was a professional photographer who took the photo, but it’s quite a statement nonetheless. Perhaps you really should sign up for those Photojojo University Phoneography 101 classes…

New York Times Uses Instagram Photo for Cover Story

Related: From the FJP archives, Photojournalism vs. Instagram.

UPDATE: Another interesting aspect about the New York Times’ use of this photo is that it isn’t from a recent shoot. Instead, it’s from last year. Nick Laham, the photographer, is based in Brooklyn. His personal site is here.

If Websites Were People

Here’s a video from Cracked.com that personifies popular websites.

Everyday Africa Takes over The New Yorker’s Instagram Feed
Via The New Yorker:

This week, the photo collective Everyday Africa, a project focussing on images of daily life in Africa, will be posting to The New Yorker’s Instagram feed. Nine photographers across the continent, from Mali to Kenya, are contributing.

Here’s The New Yorker on Instagram.
And here’s Everyday Africa on Tumblr.
Image: A motorcycle taxi driver uses his feet to steer in Bamako, Mali on January 29, by Glenna Gordon

Everyday Africa Takes over The New Yorker’s Instagram Feed

Via The New Yorker:

This week, the photo collective Everyday Africa, a project focussing on images of daily life in Africa, will be posting to The New Yorker’s Instagram feed. Nine photographers across the continent, from Mali to Kenya, are contributing.

Here’s The New Yorker on Instagram.

And here’s Everyday Africa on Tumblr.

Image: A motorcycle taxi driver uses his feet to steer in Bamako, Mali on January 29, by Glenna Gordon

Dear Users:

You are not our customers, you are the cattle we drive to market and auction off to the highest bidder. Enjoy your feed and keep producing the milk.

Reginald Braithwaite, Translation from legalese and PR-speak to English of selected portions of another overfunded startup’s communications as they “monetize” their service.

The News, via CNET:

Instagram said today that it has the perpetual right to sell users’ photographs without payment or notification, a dramatic policy shift that quickly sparked a public outcry.

The new intellectual property policy, which takes effect on January 16, comes three months after Facebook completed its acquisition of the popular photo-sharing site. Unless Instagram users delete their accounts before the January deadline, they cannot opt out.

Under the new policy, Facebook claims the perpetual right to license all public Instagram photos to companies or any other organization, including for advertising purposes, which would effectively transform the Web site into the world’s largest stock photo agency. One irked Twitter user quipped that “Instagram is now the new iStockPhoto, except they won’t have to pay you anything to use your images.”

Read On: CNET, Instagram says it now has the right to sell your photos.