posts about or somewhat related to ‘ipad’

Om Malik reviews all the iPad reviews:

The new iPad reviews are out and here is my summary of those reviews:  LTE is fast, the retina display is stunning and immersive, the new processor is speedy, the camera takes great pictures now, and the more (1 GB) memory makes the iPad awesome. In short, it is totally worth buying and upgrading. The new iPad is a little fat and little heavy, but don’t worry — wear an untucked shirt and no one would notice. Oh, but the way, bulk or not, it is still the tablet king and it totally kicks Android’s derriere. It is a little expensive, but don’t worry, it is worth it.
Depending on the reviewer, the review lengths range from 787 words to 4,968 words. Here are they ranked by least amount of words, so take your pick.
Rich Jaroslovsky: 787 words
Jim Dalrymple: 1030 words
Walt Mossberg: 1279 words
David Pogue: 1345 words
Ed Baig: 1,571 words.
John Gruber: 1822 words
Vincent Nguyen: 2393 words
MG Siegler: 2523 words
Josh Topolsky: 3646 words
Jason Snell: 4,968 words

Om Malik reviews all the iPad reviews:

The new iPad reviews are out and here is my summary of those reviews:  LTE is fast, the retina display is stunning and immersive, the new processor is speedy, the camera takes great pictures now, and the more (1 GB) memory makes the iPad awesome. In short, it is totally worth buying and upgrading. The new iPad is a little fat and little heavy, but don’t worry — wear an untucked shirt and no one would notice. Oh, but the way, bulk or not, it is still the tablet king and it totally kicks Android’s derriere. It is a little expensive, but don’t worry, it is worth it.

Depending on the reviewer, the review lengths range from 787 words to 4,968 words. Here are they ranked by least amount of words, so take your pick.

Time Inc. Skips The CES Bins, Sort Of; Offers Free Downloads Of All Titles
From paidContent:

Not too long ago, grazing the magazine bins was a perk of going to a trade show. But consolidation and closures mean fewer publications—and digital platforms offer access to the info without lugging around the ones that are left. Time (NYSE: TWX) Inc.‘s solution at CES this year?
A magazine-shaped promo piece stacked in the publication bins but with none of the publishers’ content inside. Instead, the company played up its tablet editions and their cross-device access by offering them all free of charge at CES for download to iPad, Kindle Fire, Nook Tablet/Nook Color and Android devices via NextIssue. (You can try it this weekend; the free trial ends Sunday night.)…
Instead of handling out cards for one free download or sticking with a single title or device, the company tried something that matches the best of its digital intentions: getting attention for its tablet strategy, while showing the device makers it can be a good partner and stressing an ecumenical approach at the same time.

Time Inc. Skips The CES Bins, Sort Of; Offers Free Downloads Of All Titles

From paidContent:

Not too long ago, grazing the magazine bins was a perk of going to a trade show. But consolidation and closures mean fewer publications—and digital platforms offer access to the info without lugging around the ones that are left. Time (NYSE: TWX) Inc.‘s solution at CES this year?

A magazine-shaped promo piece stacked in the publication bins but with none of the publishers’ content inside. Instead, the company played up its tablet editions and their cross-device access by offering them all free of charge at CES for download to iPad, Kindle Fire, Nook Tablet/Nook Color and Android devices via NextIssue. (You can try it this weekend; the free trial ends Sunday night.)…

Instead of handling out cards for one free download or sticking with a single title or device, the company tried something that matches the best of its digital intentions: getting attention for its tablet strategy, while showing the device makers it can be a good partner and stressing an ecumenical approach at the same time.

The Economist + Pressly + Tumblr = Electionism

The Economist recently launched a 2012 presidential HTML5 site for tablets called Electionism and uses a nifty bit of MacGyvering to get it done.

It appears the Economist Group Media Lab is using Tumblr as a backend where they curate content from various news sources. These feed into Pressly, a startup that pulls RSS feeds and Twitter posts, and extracts the content contained within links for magazine-style tablet display.

Pictured above are various screens from a tablet display and includes the Electionism Home, Category, Twitter and articles. The site currently works on the iPad, Galaxy Tab and Kindle Fire.

Interested in following the actual Electionism Tumblr? That’s over here.

Select images to embiggen.

H/T: Journalism.co.uk.

Chris Stevens, CEO of digital publisher Atomic Antelope and designer of the Alice in Wonderland iPad app, has some fighting words for traditional publishers:

The major publishers have completely abdicated responsibility for producing the digital versions of their catalogues: it’s all handed over to amateurs. You see it throughout the industry. From the typographical horror of most eBooks, through to the lacklustre iPad titles being produced. The big problem is that most publishers don’t care about the iPad or eBooks very much, whether this is an aesthetic rejection based on the publisher’s historical reverence for the printed page, or a reflection of the relatively small profits to be made on the iPad so far, it’s hard to know.

What’s happening at the moment is that most publishers are handing their major titles over to app developers who are ruining these titles with rushed, unprofessional layout and design. There is this weird situation where programmers are suddenly being given free reign to design books. We watch as publishers like Random House outsource the design of cherished titles to programmers who—despite their excellence at programming—are not designers. The complete lack of care and attention paid to the production of digital books is genuinely mystifying.

When the Alice app was released 2010, it was criticized by the New York Times for disrupting quiet and reflective reading.

Stevens responded at the time in a Fast Company interview, saying, “”The paper publishers have clearly demonstrated that they have absolutely no acuity in the digital realm, and are stuck… Working with them is a waste of energy. Imagine if Henry Ford had decided to team up with a horse stables to make the Model T.”

Guardian Starts Charging 280,000 iPad Readers From Friday; How Will It Go?
From paidContent (a subsidiary of the Guardian)

Starting Friday, The Guardian, a stalwart of free content, will find out just how many people will pay to read its news on tablets.
Free since its mid-October launch thanks to a Channel 4 sponsorship, the publisher’s newspaper-like, iOS 5-only iPad app will require a £9.99 monthly subscription from January 13.
How will it fare? Guardian News & Media claims 500,000 downloads since launch, but the real number of users is half that - the app had 280,000 active users in December, the publisher tells paidContent.
If The Guardian converts 17 percent of last month’s readers (that’s the proportion of its iPhone users who have subscribed), itcould achieve 47,600 paying iPad customers, yielding about £475,000 in monthly sales, before 30 percent is given to Apple.
Half a million people have tried the app so far in three months. For new users, the conversion tactic will be free trial - they getseven days of free access before a hard-stop subscription requirement.
That is unlike The Guardian’s iPhone app, which gives all users three free stories every day before requiring a monthly subscription (£2.99 for six months, £4.99 for 12 months, free in the U.S.).
If there is a challenge to the plan, however, it is that The Guardian gives readers an easy choice to revert to using its free Guardian.co.uk website.
The attractive iPad app was designed to showcase stories from the daily newspaper. Exploring related and other articles take users out of the paid app experience and to the same website nobody pays anything for.
Guardian.co.uk is also pushing some of the same content found in the app out for free to Facebook and Tumblr, while the app lacks some of the editorial components Guardian.co.uk trades most heavily on, like live blogs.

Guardian Starts Charging 280,000 iPad Readers From Friday; How Will It Go?

From paidContent (a subsidiary of the Guardian)

Starting Friday, The Guardian, a stalwart of free content, will find out just how many people will pay to read its news on tablets.

Free since its mid-October launch thanks to a Channel 4 sponsorship, the publisher’s newspaper-like, iOS 5-only iPad app will require a £9.99 monthly subscription from January 13.

How will it fare? Guardian News & Media claims 500,000 downloads since launch, but the real number of users is half that - the app had 280,000 active users in December, the publisher tells paidContent.

If The Guardian converts 17 percent of last month’s readers (that’s the proportion of its iPhone users who have subscribed), itcould achieve 47,600 paying iPad customers, yielding about £475,000 in monthly sales, before 30 percent is given to Apple.

Half a million people have tried the app so far in three months. For new users, the conversion tactic will be free trial - they getseven days of free access before a hard-stop subscription requirement.

That is unlike The Guardian’s iPhone app, which gives all users three free stories every day before requiring a monthly subscription (£2.99 for six months, £4.99 for 12 months, free in the U.S.).

If there is a challenge to the plan, however, it is that The Guardian gives readers an easy choice to revert to using its free Guardian.co.uk website.

The attractive iPad app was designed to showcase stories from the daily newspaper. Exploring related and other articles take users out of the paid app experience and to the same website nobody pays anything for.

Guardian.co.uk is also pushing some of the same content found in the app out for free to Facebook and Tumblr, while the app lacks some of the editorial components Guardian.co.uk trades most heavily on, like live blogs.

Joe Sabia uses technology to tell the story of innovative storytelling in history.  I just love this video. 

(Source: )

Apple makes largest acquisition since it bought Steve Jobs’ NeXT in 1996

May my spinning hard drive one day be a thing of the past. From Fortune:

According to Reuters, Apple (AAPL) has sealed the deal that was rumored last week to buy Anobit, the Israeli company that makes the flash memory technology used in Apple’s iPhones, iPads and MacBook Airs.

For Apple, this is a big acquisition, both in dollar terms and in technology. The price — a reported $500 million — is larger than the $472 million it paid for NeXT, once 14 years of inflation is taken into account.

The acquisition also reinforces Apple’s growing commitment to flash memory, which is gradually replacing the hard drives the company has been using for mass storage since the mid 1980s. Apple is now the world’s largest consumer of flash, thanks to sales of its iPods, iPads and iPhones.

The MacBook Air also relies on solid state (rather than mechanical disk) memory, and flash is now an option on the company’s MacBook Pros as well.

The E-book Investigations: Are Publishers And Apple Breaking The Law?

paidContent has a good primer on the European Commission and Justice Department investigations into the e-Book industry.

Before Congress today, the head of the Justice Department’s antitrust division reportedly confirmed months of rumors by stating that the federal government and state attorneys general are investigating the electronic book industry. Earlier this week, the European Commission said it has begun formal investigations to follow up on raids of publishers’ offices that took place in March.What is the Conspiracy?

The case turns on “agency pricing,” a scheme under which the publishers set the price for e-books on the iPad. In return, Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) collects a commission.

What is the Point Of Agency Pricing?

Publishers watched in horror as Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN) decided to build up its market share in e-books by selling prized titles for less than $10. Amazon sometimes sold at a loss. This set a low floor for e-book prices and also threatened the sale of more expensive hard cover books. The agency model lets publishers set higher prices and ensure customers don’t become used to cheap e-books.

What’s the Problem with Agency Pricing?

The class action suits complain that agency pricing is an illegal cartel. Here is how one complaint describes it: “As a direct result of this anti-competitive conduct as intended by the conspiracy, the price of e-books has soared. The price of new best-selling e-books increased to an average of $12 - $15—an increase of 30 to 50 percent.”Is Agency Pricing Against the Law?

For decades, it was illegal for manufacturers to impose prices on retailers. That’s why you used to see “Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price” on many items—companies could suggest a price but not impose one. This changed after a 2007 case called Leegin in which the Supreme Court said it wasn’t illegal for a handbag maker to control prices. Now, the analysis is done on a case-by-case basis to see if pricing is fair. In this case, the publishers are the manufacturers and Apple is the retailer.

Mark Coker of SmashWords, which works with Indie authors to get their titles on e-Books, adds some insight from the small guy perspective in support of Apple, Amazon and the large publishers:

It would be a sad day for authors, publishers, readers and online bookstores if agency pricing was overturned, because it could allow one or two well-funded companies to sell books at below cost and effectively drive every other ebook retailer out of business.  That would lead to *less* competition in the ebook retailing market, not more, would prevent the development of indie ebook retailers in smaller markets, and would ultimately lead to less competition and higher prices.

What critics of agency pricing forget is that these large traditional publishers are becoming less and less relevant each year as more authors independently publish and distribute their own books.  At Smashwords, we distribute over 90,000 of such indie ebooks, and we let our authors and publishers set their own prices. We only distribute to agency retailers.  These indie authors benefit from the higher royalty rates enabled by agency pricing, and they set the average price of their book under $5.00.  Why do they price low when they have the power to price high?  Because they know they can sell more copies at a lower price, and since they’re earning 60-70% of the retail price under agency vs. 42-50% under wholesale, the author can still earn more at a lower price to the consumer.

If an author wants to earn $2.00 for each book they sell, they’d set the price to customer at $2.86 under Agency and $4.00 under wholesale.  In this new world of indie publishing, Agency facilitates lower prices.

The book market is extremely competitive, and that’s a good thing.  If publishers make the mistake of pricing their books too high, readers now have 90,000+ lower cost alternatives.

Here’s an interview I did with Michael Dunn, CTO of Hearst Interactive Media, at the Streaming Media conference in Los Angeles a few weeks ago.

We cover everything from producing video for tablets, devices and mobile, to metadata and adaptive streaming.

To watch all video interviews from the conference, visit StreamingMedia.com

- Peter

11% Of Magazine Readers Are Digital-Only, Survey Shows

Out of all U.S. adults who read magazines, 11 percent do so exclusively via digital platforms, new data from GfK MRI says. But with newsstands available on more devices, that number should increase.

Between May and October 2011, GfK MRI estimates that 1.58 billion U.S. adults read magazines. Of those, the company pegs the print + digital audience at 135 million people, and digital-only at 166 million people. That digital-only group is made primarily of men (63 percent), and they’re more likely to be young, affluent and well-educated. The sample size for this survey was 12,546 people, and GfK MRI extrapolates its results to the entire U.S. adult population.

Digital magazine reading is likely to increase as digital newsstands become available on more devices. The Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) Newsstand, launched in October, has broughtsome magazine publishers a significant number of new readers. Conde Nast, for example, reported subscription sales across nine titles up 268 percent in the two weeks following the Newsstand’s launch.

Comic Books, Grids and Designing the News

The Color Machine produced this interview with Khoi Vinh, former design director for the New York Times. In it, Vinh talks about design grids, reducing complexity and how comic books helped him formulate a design theory of his own.

Unrelated but Interesting: Vinh and Scott Ostler just launched Mixel. It’s a social iPad collage making tool for the iPad.

Via Vinh’s blog Subtraction:

Our goal with Mixel is to turn the act of art-making into something incredibly easy, fun and even addictive. Just as importantly, we also want art-making to be deeply social. Mixel is a social network of its own — you sign in with Facebook, and you can find and follow anyone on the network to see all the great work they’re producing. You can also comment, like and share the art, just as you would on any other social network.

But we chose collage for a very important reason: it makes art easy. Photos, the component pieces of every collage, are among the most social and viral content on the Web, and allowing people to combine them into new, highly specific expressions of who they are and what they’re interested in is powerful. Collage also has a wonderfully accessible quality; few people are comfortable with a brush or a drawing implement, but almost everyone is comfortable cutting up images and recombining them in new, expressive, surprising or hilarious ways. We all used to do this as kids.

Mixel is available in the iTunes store. A video of it in action is at mixel.cc.

Disruptive Companies Infographic

Disruptive companies create innovations that invade the market, force change, and create new sectors of the industry. Here we examine a list of disruptive companies, and the industry effects of their innovation.

iPad, Google Apps, Skype, Zynga, Tata Nano, Netflix, Pandora
via Focus

Disruptive Companies Infographic

Disruptive companies create innovations that invade the market, force change, and create new sectors of the industry. Here we examine a list of disruptive companies, and the industry effects of their innovation.

iPad, Google Apps, Skype, Zynga, Tata Nano, Netflix, Pandora

via Focus

Apple’s Newsstand Is Already Booming For Magazine Publishers

Exact Editions downloads

Early indications are that Apple’s new iOS features for publishers have had an immediate beneficial impact.

  • Exact Editions, which says it made about 10 percent of the Newsstand app titles on iTunes Store, says downloads of freemium sample editions jumped by 14x in just a few days, whilst some titles’ actual sales have more than doubled.
  • Consumer magazine publisher Future says free container apps for its titles were downloaded two million times in three days and reports “consumer spending well in excess of normal monthly revenues”. “Future has sold more digital editions in the past four days through Apple’s Newsstand than in a normal month,” says UK CEO Mark Wood.

Khoi Vinh: Magazines Are Failing at the iPad

Digiday interviewed former New York Times design director Khoi Vinh, who has been critical of publishers’ approaches to the iPad. 

How important is the emergence of HTML5 for tablet publishers? Can you see them gravitating towards browser-based experiences over apps as that technology becomes more robust?

There are two strains here. On the tech side, HTML5 is the way of the future. It’s too expensive to publish native apps for iOS, Android and all the different platforms. HTML5 is a much better delivery mechanism for this stuff than a native app. It’s much more affordable and much more portable. On the other side, though, it’s not just about the tech. I had underestimated how effective Apple’s AppStore would be in terms of distributing applications. You can’t beat that, so publishers will have to stay with apps for at least the immediate future.

To date, publishers seem to have focused on simply updating or transposing their print products for use on the device, but are they missing an opportunity in doing so? Should they be rethinking the way they deliver content from the ground up?

Absolutely. I just can’t see the end-to-end magazine format surviving. The Internet lets people consume media in a-la-carte form. To force a package of content on folks is unnatural. Some folks will continue to like the magazine format, but as social distribution becomes the way we discover and receive more of our content, it won’t make sense to sell it in these virtual boxes any more.

What possibilities should publishers be exploring, then?

One glaring omission in the way we package content for tablets is really relevance. Much like when you go to Amazon, they display similar products other people have bought; we don’t have anything nearly as good in realm of publishing. It’s not just recommendations, though. It’s about understanding true relevance. If you look at an app like Flipboard, that’s the one major thing it’s missing. The tech startup that can solve that problem will push forward this area of digital publishing in a big way.

Weigh in with your thoughts on publishers and their tablet strategies.

(Source: digiday.com)