Posts tagged with ‘iphone’

Door Number One, Door Number Two?
Via Stowe Boyd.

Door Number One, Door Number Two?

Via Stowe Boyd.

(Source: warrenellis)

What does an iPhone-ified newspaper look like?

Back in May, The Chicago Sun-Times fired its entire photo staff (including Pulitzer Prize winner John White) in favor of training its reporters in the art of iPhone photography. The blog SunTimes/DarkTimes has been closely following the paper’s transition, collecting images on its front pages and website.

In a similar vein, former Sun-Times staff photographer Rob Hart started his iPhone-driven blog as a way to chronicle his life after being laid-off. In an interview with Chicagoist, Hart gave his opinion on the paper’s decision:

"Look, an iPhone can be used to take amazing photographs. But not every owner of an iPhone has the ability to capture a moment and tell a story with pictures the way a photojournalist can…I don’t think (reporters shooting pictures with iPhones) will succeed…Everything is done on the cheap. I don’t think anything they do has a chance of succeeding."

comment on SunTimes/DarkTimes lamented the iPhone-ified paper:

The quality in images is like night and day. Truly saddening to see some of the best talent discarded over some dollars and cents.

FJP: The aesthetic quality isn’t the only thing the Sun-Times put at stake. A strong photograph doesn’t just merely accompany an article or fill up space on a website. Photojournalists in the past have shown us that photos can enhance a story and even tell the tale on their own. I hope the Sun-Times does not lose sight of that. —Kat

Images: Screenshots of newspapers curated by SunTimes/DarkTimes blog.

Tech Talk: iPhone 5

SNL with a look at what happens when tech reporters meet the gadget makers.

Photographing a Revolution with an iPhone
Pretty self explanatory, but very good work: all of these photos were taken by photojournalist Benjamin Lowy last summer, before the rebels killed Gaddafi and long before the recent attacks on the US Embassy. See the rest here.
From Mother Jones:

Why didn’t he work with fancier gear? “Small mobile phone cameras are innocuous and enable a far greater intimacy with a subject,” Lowy says, noting that Libyans themselves have also done much to document their surroundings, thanks to the ubiquitous technology.

Photographing a Revolution with an iPhone

Pretty self explanatory, but very good work: all of these photos were taken by photojournalist Benjamin Lowy last summer, before the rebels killed Gaddafi and long before the recent attacks on the US Embassy. See the rest here.

From Mother Jones:

Why didn’t he work with fancier gear? “Small mobile phone cameras are innocuous and enable a far greater intimacy with a subject,” Lowy says, noting that Libyans themselves have also done much to document their surroundings, thanks to the ubiquitous technology.

It’s a Phone, We Just Don’t Talk on it Anymore
Five years ago Apple released the iPhone and, as Matthew Ingram writes over at GigaOm, it didn’t just disrupt photography, and the music and mobile software business, but the entire technology industry.
We don’t even really talk on it anymore. Or, as a report from UK telecommunications company O2 indicates, we do a whole host of things with our smart phones before actually making a call.
Via The Next Web:

Browsing the Internet is the most frequent activity on smartphones these days, accounting for 25 minutes a day, while more specifically, checking social networking sites accounts for 17.5 minutes of our time. Listening to music (15.5) and playing games (14.5) were also more popular than good old-fashioned voice calls, which apparently people only spend a little more than 12 minutes a day doing…
…According to O2’s ‘All About You’ report, which was based on a survey involving 2,000 people, we spend around 2 hours a day on average using our smartphones, which also includes other activities such as testing, emailing, reading books and taking photographs.

At GigaOm, Ingram reflects on how the iPhone has changed both news consumption and production. Think: the phone lets you take notes, record interviews, take pictures and — maybe most important — find your way to where you actually have to be.
Combine the iPhone with Twitter — along with feed readers and the general mobile Web — and you have both a news alert and publishing system in your pocket.
Via GigaOm:

In some ways, the iPhone and Twitter were made for each other: one allows for the easy creation of content and the other allows it to be easily shared and distributed far and wide. These things can be done on other handsets, and there are plenty of Android and other devices that allow for the same experience, but the iPhone was arguably the first to take those abilities and make them widely available — and appealing enough for many to want to do so.
Now we’re starting to see apps and services that take advantage of this ability, whether it’s things like iWitness or other platforms that filter user-generated content, or networks that allow smartphone users to sell newsworthy photos or videos they have taken. The San Jose Mercury News conducted an interesting experiment with an app called TapIn, which allowed users to post photos and other content about breaking news, and allowed journalists and others to send out public calls for crowdsourced photos or videos of events as well.

Not bad for a five-year-old innovation.
Image: iPhone Birthday Cake, by Garrett Dimon.

It’s a Phone, We Just Don’t Talk on it Anymore

Five years ago Apple released the iPhone and, as Matthew Ingram writes over at GigaOm, it didn’t just disrupt photography, and the music and mobile software business, but the entire technology industry.

We don’t even really talk on it anymore. Or, as a report from UK telecommunications company O2 indicates, we do a whole host of things with our smart phones before actually making a call.

Via The Next Web:

Browsing the Internet is the most frequent activity on smartphones these days, accounting for 25 minutes a day, while more specifically, checking social networking sites accounts for 17.5 minutes of our time. Listening to music (15.5) and playing games (14.5) were also more popular than good old-fashioned voice calls, which apparently people only spend a little more than 12 minutes a day doing…

…According to O2’s ‘All About You’ report, which was based on a survey involving 2,000 people, we spend around 2 hours a day on average using our smartphones, which also includes other activities such as testing, emailing, reading books and taking photographs.

At GigaOm, Ingram reflects on how the iPhone has changed both news consumption and production. Think: the phone lets you take notes, record interviews, take pictures and — maybe most important — find your way to where you actually have to be.

Combine the iPhone with Twitter — along with feed readers and the general mobile Web — and you have both a news alert and publishing system in your pocket.

Via GigaOm:

In some ways, the iPhone and Twitter were made for each other: one allows for the easy creation of content and the other allows it to be easily shared and distributed far and wide. These things can be done on other handsets, and there are plenty of Android and other devices that allow for the same experience, but the iPhone was arguably the first to take those abilities and make them widely available — and appealing enough for many to want to do so.

Now we’re starting to see apps and services that take advantage of this ability, whether it’s things like iWitness or other platforms that filter user-generated content, or networks that allow smartphone users to sell newsworthy photos or videos they have taken. The San Jose Mercury News conducted an interesting experiment with an app called TapIn, which allowed users to post photos and other content about breaking news, and allowed journalists and others to send out public calls for crowdsourced photos or videos of events as well.

Not bad for a five-year-old innovation.

Image: iPhone Birthday Cake, by Garrett Dimon.


Bloomberg reaches iPhone readers by giving them a word count
The Bloomberg Businessweek iPad app has been a success for nearly a year now, and this week they’re bringing it to the iPhone. The difference being that:

It gives readers a word count for stories, making it easier to pick out the most digestible piece given whatever amount of time you have. “We know through the course of the day on iPhone people are going to come in and out, and we want to give them a perspective of the (time) commitment,” Oke Okaro said.

Tip toeing around the other things people use their phones for, the global head of mobile there says there’s a lot to learn from watching how people use the app over the next few months.

Since the iPad version of the app has been out for some time, Bloomberg has data on their readers’ habits, and they generally line up with what we’ve seen elsewhere: People are reading the magazine in the evening and on weekends. The magazine has grown a steady stream of new subscribers and converted print readers to verify their subscription, so the iPhone edition is a play at expanding their audience.

Via Nieman Lab.

Bloomberg reaches iPhone readers by giving them a word count

The Bloomberg Businessweek iPad app has been a success for nearly a year now, and this week they’re bringing it to the iPhone. The difference being that:

It gives readers a word count for stories, making it easier to pick out the most digestible piece given whatever amount of time you have. “We know through the course of the day on iPhone people are going to come in and out, and we want to give them a perspective of the (time) commitment,” Oke Okaro said.

Tip toeing around the other things people use their phones for, the global head of mobile there says there’s a lot to learn from watching how people use the app over the next few months.

Since the iPad version of the app has been out for some time, Bloomberg has data on their readers’ habits, and they generally line up with what we’ve seen elsewhere: People are reading the magazine in the evening and on weekends. The magazine has grown a steady stream of new subscribers and converted print readers to verify their subscription, so the iPhone edition is a play at expanding their audience.

Via Nieman Lab.

Chinese Teen Sells Kidney to Buy iThings →

In the United States 34% of teenagers have an iPhone and another 40% hope to buy one sometime in the next six months.

If you’re in the market, don’t do it this way:

Five people in southern China have been charged with intentional injury in the case of a Chinese teenager who sold a kidney so he could buy an iPhone and an iPad, the government-run Xinhua News Agency said on Friday.

The five included a surgeon who removed a kidney from a 17-year-old boy in April last year. The boy, identified only by his surname Wang, now suffers from renal deficiency, Xinhua quoted prosecutors in Chenzhou city, Hunan province as saying.

According to the Xinhua account, one of the defendants received about 220,000 yuan (about $35,000) to arrange the transplant. He paid Wang 22,000 yuan [about $3,500] and split the rest with the surgeon, the three other defendants and other medical staff.

USA Today Bets on Adaptive Mobile

Digiday highlights USA Today’s approach to app development. USA Today is the only “big 3” publisher (WSJ, NY Times, USA Today) to not charge for content on any device, relying exclusively on advertising: 

Newspapers are experimenting with different ways of distributing content on tablets. When it comes to mobile, most publications rush to replicate their content via an app. USA Today is thinking different.

USA Today is betting on an adaptive experience that morphs with the device. While there’s no dynamic personalization based on user behavior or any type of intelligence, the articles served up on the iPad vary from person to person. For example, I read USA Today sports stories, and my colleague reads tech and advertising stories. In turn, more sports stories appear in my app than in my colleague’s app, and she therefore receives more tech and advertising stories.

“We don’t create for the paper and port to the mobile,” said Matt de Ganon, vp of mobile product and operations. “We create content, and it gets certain finite production on the digital properties; it’s a fluid experience of, here is the format that works best, and here is the subset of content that works best on smartphone, or here’s the context of tablet.”

Three Unique Publisher Apps

Digiday points out 3 mobile apps created by publishers that go above and beyond just recreating the web & print experience (look, feel, layout, content). You know, actual innovation on the mobile front:

Unfortunately for readers, it seems as though media outlets often take the path of least resistance and just port their online content into an app. There are a few, however, who forge their own paths. Here are three unique mobile apps where publishers are trying something new.

Orange County Register: This local California paper (1.3 million uniques in February 2012, according to comScore) takes a unique approach to delivering content on its app, The Peel. The outlet plays to the audience, serving stories throughout six categories — news, sports, business, trending, things to do, and photo/video gallery — that are chosen based on iPad reader’s interests and many of the stories can only be found within the application. Additionally, the app pushes content in the evening and each addition features content exclusively for the app. A novel approach for a local outlet, this app can go a long way for those living in the OC — or those just stopping by.

Download the app here.

WP Politics The Washington Post has an election 2012 specific app, which does way more than port content from its website. Sure, there’s news from the paper and a website that finds its way onto the app — like Ezra Klein’s blog or The Fact Checker — but the app delivers additional information that’s not on the site: a polling map for the uber-wonky who want to know how each candidate is faring in sentiment at any given time; candidate issues tracker, which uses motion graphics to provide users with an “at-a-glance” understanding of where each of the candidates stand, and previously stood, on the major issues of the campaign; the historical election results map, which includes every vote, in every state, for every candidate, in every presidential election since 1789, and is presented with Washington Post articles written before and after every election since 1880. This app is a political wonk’s dream as it gives information that can’t even be found on the Washington Post’s site.

Download the app here.

King’s Cross, London – Streetstories The Guardian recently released an app that lets users listen to the sounds of Foggy London Town while walking the streets of King’s Cross. Additionally, the app serves as a walking guide with more than 70 stories and two hours of audio material, all relevant to a user’s location. The app boasts of readings from Dickens (location-specific), the architecture of Gilbert Scott’s St. Pancras, as well interviews with former street workers giving listeners an oral history of the area. This is a great idea for users who want to learn more about their surroundings. Hopefully other major news outlets will follow in The Guardian’s footsteps, especially in cities around the world.

Download the app here.

crookedindifference:

NASA Launches Comet-Hunting iPhone Game

Ever wanted to steer a robotic spacecraft toward a comet rendezvous in deep space? Now there’s an app for that.

NASA’s new free iPhone game Comet Quest puts players at the controls of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, which is slated to arrive at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014.

Comet Quest, which NASA released on Feb. 29,  is meant to be fun, but it strives to teach above all, according to the game’s developers.

“Of course, since it is a NASA-sponsored app, education is its true raison d’être,” Diane Fisher, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., told SPACE.com via email. Fisher is webmaster for The Space Place, a NASA website that aims to engage elementary-school students in science, technology and math.

Fish where the fish are, is what we say.

(via crookedindifference)

Syria: Songs of Defiance

Al Jazeera will begin airing a documentary on the Syria uprising that was shot entirely on an iPhone. According to the network, Al Jazeera cameras are banned in Syria and their correspondent went undercover to meet “resistance fighters, protesters, Syrian army deserters, footballers-turned-revolutionaries and cigarette smugglers who have joined the fight.”

Journalism.co.uk adds the following from an Al Jazeera press release:

I can’t tell you my name. I’ve spent many months secretly in Syria for Al Jazeera.

I cannot show my face and my voice is disguised to conceal my identity, because I don’t want to endanger my contacts in Syria.

Because carrying a camera would be risky, I took my cell phone with me as I moved around the country and captured images from the uprising that have so far remained unseen.

Songs of Defiance begins airing this Wednesday and will run through next week. Al Jazeera has posted its schedule here.

Apple Revenue by Business Unit Google Revenue by Business Unit Microsoft Revenue by Business Unit

Ed Bott read the 2011 SEC filings for Apple, Google, and Microsoft and put together these handy pie charts to understand what drives each companies business.

Three companies are at the forefront of modern personal computing: Microsoft, Apple, and Google.

After reading through the most recent SEC-mandated financial reports for each company, I was inspired to put together these three pie charts. The data paints a vivid picture of where each company’s revenue comes from.

Microsoft is a software company. Apple’s a hardware company. But what business is Google in?

Riffing on Ed’s charts, MG Siegler pointed out that:

Last quarter, Microsoft brought in $20.89 billion in revenue. Apple brought in $46.33 billion

Put another way: Apple’s iPhone business alone is larger than all of Microsoft’s businesses combined.

And — just as remarkably — if you took away Apple’s iPhone business from the chart, the remaining Apple businesses would still be larger than Microsoft’s total business. And Apple’s earnings would look a lot more evenly distributed then.

(Source: zdnet.com)

Apple makes largest acquisition since it bought Steve Jobs’ NeXT in 1996

May my spinning hard drive one day be a thing of the past. From Fortune:

According to Reuters, Apple (AAPL) has sealed the deal that was rumored last week to buy Anobit, the Israeli company that makes the flash memory technology used in Apple’s iPhones, iPads and MacBook Airs.

For Apple, this is a big acquisition, both in dollar terms and in technology. The price — a reported $500 million — is larger than the $472 million it paid for NeXT, once 14 years of inflation is taken into account.

The acquisition also reinforces Apple’s growing commitment to flash memory, which is gradually replacing the hard drives the company has been using for mass storage since the mid 1980s. Apple is now the world’s largest consumer of flash, thanks to sales of its iPods, iPads and iPhones.

The MacBook Air also relies on solid state (rather than mechanical disk) memory, and flash is now an option on the company’s MacBook Pros as well.

Thought I’d check in on Twitter to see what’s happening with Apple’s iPhone event.

This is 15 seconds of how quickly people are posting.

Clever that Verizon took out an ad for the #iPhone hashtag, or a waste of money… since they’re promoting Android?