Posts tagged with ‘ira glass’

Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.

Ira Glass to Lifehacker. I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work.

Quick tip for things to do immediately post-interview:

When I come out of an interview, I jot down the things I remember as being my favorite moments. For an hour-long interview usually it’s just four or five moments, but if out I’m reporting all day, I’ll spend over an hour at night typing out every favorite thing that happened. This is handier than you might think. Often this short list of favorite things will provide the backbone to the structure to my story.

Read through for the gear This American Life uses and its editing process.

This American Life Celebrates 500th Episode
Once called the vanguard of a journalistic revolution by the American Journalism Review, This American Life aired its very first episode on July 5, 1995. Now in its 18th year, the weekly show entertains an audience of about 1.8 million with its thought-provoking programs. In a recent interview with Slate, founder and host Ira Glass reflected on the program’s evolution:


Over the last few years, we’ve gone from being a show that was almost entirely very personal stories to a show that is much more engaging the news. When the show started, the mission of the show was to apply the tools of journalism to stories so small and personal that journalists weren’t doing them. And occasionally, we would do something that would touch the news…But after 9/11, we became more interested in the news—the whole country became more interested in the news. And the show exists partly to follow what we as a staff are interested in.

For the 500th episode, the staff will talk about their favorite moments on This American Life. Glass praised the show’s experimental format, which he described as “flexible enough that we can to do whatever we want.”
It’s interesting to note that in an accompanying interview, Glass said he thinks of his interviews with guests as story plots:

Really what I’m thinking about is: “What is the story arc of this story? How do I get plot going and how can I get them to tell me the plot in a way that will work in on the radio?” So… I’ll go into the interview with a set of thoughts I have about their experience.

Bonus: You can catch the 500th episode and browse previous episodes stretching back to 1995 through This American Life’s archive. 
Image: viatvtropes

This American Life Celebrates 500th Episode

Once called the vanguard of a journalistic revolution by the American Journalism Review, This American Life aired its very first episode on July 5, 1995. Now in its 18th year, the weekly show entertains an audience of about 1.8 million with its thought-provoking programs. In a recent interview with Slate, founder and host Ira Glass reflected on the program’s evolution:

Over the last few years, we’ve gone from being a show that was almost entirely very personal stories to a show that is much more engaging the news. When the show started, the mission of the show was to apply the tools of journalism to stories so small and personal that journalists weren’t doing them. And occasionally, we would do something that would touch the news…But after 9/11, we became more interested in the news—the whole country became more interested in the news. And the show exists partly to follow what we as a staff are interested in.

For the 500th episode, the staff will talk about their favorite moments on This American Life. Glass praised the show’s experimental format, which he described as “flexible enough that we can to do whatever we want.”

It’s interesting to note that in an accompanying interview, Glass said he thinks of his interviews with guests as story plots:

Really what I’m thinking about is: “What is the story arc of this story? How do I get plot going and how can I get them to tell me the plot in a way that will work in on the radio?” So… I’ll go into the interview with a set of thoughts I have about their experience.

Bonus: You can catch the 500th episode and browse previous episodes stretching back to 1995 through This American Life’s archive

Image: viatvtropes

A great story is like a great melody: it announces its inevitable greatness and you recognize it the first time you hear it. Most stories aren’t that. They do not announce their obvious greatness. 60% are in the limbo region where they might GET great or they might flop, and the only way to figure it out is to start making the story. So you launch in, hoping for that winning combination of great moments, charm, funny, and X factor.

As a result, we go through tons of stories on our way to the few that end up on the air. It’s like harnessing luck as an industrial product. You want to get hit by lightning, so you have to wander around for a long time in the rain.

— Ira Glass, host and producer of This American Life, in a Reddit Ask Me Anything from earlier today.

I don’t believe in guilty pleasures, I only believe in pleasures. People who call reading detective fiction or eating dessert a guilty pleasure make me want to puke. Pedophilia is a pleasure a person should have guilt about. Not chocolate.

— Ira Glass to the New York Times Sunday Book Review. Ira Glass: By the Book.

drewvigal:

jayrosen:

All of this becomes clear in Retraction, which is an extraordinary display of transparency in corrective journalism.

Agreed. Definitely worth a listen.

FJP: Important as can be. Ira Glass and This American Life retraction of its Mike Daisey Apple/Foxconn episode.

Should be listened to but if you want to read the transcript, it’s available here.

Ira Glass on storytelling and harnessing creativity.

Illustrated by David Shiyang Liu.

Ira Glass: ‘Who cares if radio survives? Something else will happen’

It’s a predictable but important question, whenever you get a group of successful radio storytellers in a room. Will the medium survive? Or rather, do talented people still need the traditional institutions of radio to do good work?
Apparently this is the magic question that activates Angry Ira Glass.
At WFMU’s Radiovision Festival last Saturday, Ira Glass (This American Life), Marc Maron (WTF), and Tom Scharpling (The Best Show On WFMU) gathered for a panel discussion about, among other things, the future of the craft. Eventually, moderator Therese Mahler asked the magic question.
Glass replied, agitated: “For some reason radio seems to survive, and I believe it’s because as long as there are cars with radios and people are lazy, people will get into a car and turn on a radio.”
Later, he continued: “It’s disturbingly nostalgic. I mean, who cares if it survives? Who cares if radio survives? Like, something else will happen,” Glass said. When Maron pressed him for what, exactly, that might be, Glass struggled to come up with an answer.

I love that photoshop job. haha. Ira is right, sound is malleable. It’ll be fine. 
for the rest of the article and a link the the 5 min conversation, see Niemanlab.

Ira Glass: ‘Who cares if radio survives? Something else will happen’

It’s a predictable but important question, whenever you get a group of successful radio storytellers in a room. Will the medium survive? Or rather, do talented people still need the traditional institutions of radio to do good work?

Apparently this is the magic question that activates Angry Ira Glass.

At WFMU’s Radiovision Festival last Saturday, Ira Glass (This American Life), Marc Maron (WTF), and Tom Scharpling (The Best Show On WFMU) gathered for a panel discussion about, among other things, the future of the craft. Eventually, moderator Therese Mahler asked the magic question.

Glass replied, agitated: “For some reason radio seems to survive, and I believe it’s because as long as there are cars with radios and people are lazy, people will get into a car and turn on a radio.”

Later, he continued: “It’s disturbingly nostalgic. I mean, who cares if it survives? Who cares if radio survives? Like, something else will happen,” Glass said. When Maron pressed him for what, exactly, that might be, Glass struggled to come up with an answer.

I love that photoshop job. haha. Ira is right, sound is malleable. It’ll be fine. 

for the rest of the article and a link the the 5 min conversation, see Niemanlab.

We can get behind it.

wnyc:

Heavy swearing from Ira Glass. Excellent.

(also: co-sign on the effort)

afajp:

You know him as host of NPR’s “This American Life,” but we here at AFAJP strictly know Ira Glass as devoted supporter of our mission to get The Onion a Pulitzer Prize. 

Are you as angry as he is? 

As fans of the This American Life we were happy to come across this brief clip of Ira Glass discussing structural techniques of good storytelling.

This is part one of four. Follow the links to watch parts two, three and four.

Hat tip to Mark Berkely-Gerard whose post on multimedia storytelling lead us to the video.