Posts tagged with ‘jonathan stray’

General news is not relevant to young people because they don’t have context. It’s a lot of abstract storytelling and arguing among adults that makes no sense. So most young people end up consuming celebrity news. To top it off, news agencies, for obvious reasons, are trying to limit access to their content by making you pay for it. Well, guess what: Young people aren’t going out of their way to try to find this news, so you put up one little wall, and poof, done. They’re not even going to bother.

Said (Microsoft researcher) Danah Boyd, addressing why young people aren’t following traditional, regular news.

FJP: Can’t help but think of this, for one thing. Also, if you’re interested: Jonathan Stray on making news immersive.

via Poynter.

Jonathan Stray of the Associated Press on investigating thousands (or millions) of documents by visualizing clusters. Presentation is from February 2011 at the National Institute of Computer-Assisted Reporting.

Visualizations built with multidimensional scaling algorithm Glimmer.

Run Time - 19:50

H/T: Curiosity Counts.

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).
Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.
What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.
Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.
Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 
"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."
And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).

Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.

What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.

Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.

Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 

"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."

And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.