posts about or somewhat related to ‘jouranlism’

Gawker Reimagines Commenting with Kinja
Blog network Gawker unveiled an additional reblogging feature on Kinja, its blog aggregator and discussion platform. Now each time Gawker readers re-blog or share articles on the platform, they can rewrite the headlines and lead paragraphs, Nieman Lab reports:

The reframing functionality…allows several versions of the same story to circulate under different headlines. So where one reader might write the headline “Cat Neckties Are Things That Exist; Are Popular,” another could share that original post but reframe it as “Nutty cat owners forcing pets to wear ‘cat neckties.’” An original post with the headline “The Truth About Being Broke” might be reframed as “How to survive being totally broke.”

Gawker CEO Nick Denton launched Kinja in 2004 and sees comments as content, not just noise attached to content. “The whole point of Kinja is to turn the conversation into news — on a grander scale than we do already on the Gawker blogs,” Denton told Nieman Lab. 

“For instance, say a story was written for gamers — they can translate it for a more general audience,” Denton said. “And, if that URL is shared, it is shared with the new headline and intro.”
So a reader gets to repurpose and share an article in whatever context she chooses, with the original article appearing in full below her headline and introduction, but the original story gets the traffic. Gawker editors can also snap up original reader contributions to Kinja, reframe them, and share those reader-generated posts with the wider Gawker network. Staffers can aggregate commenters; commenters can aggregate staffers; at some point, the distinctions start to dissolve.
Wresting this kind of editorial control from the professionals may make some journalists uneasy, but it’s already how people are interacting with content (and with one another) on other platforms. Denton calls Kinja “by far the most significant tech investment” that the company has ever made, with 30 tech staffers working full-time on the project for the past year.

Image: Kinja logo, Wikipedia

Gawker Reimagines Commenting with Kinja

Blog network Gawker unveiled an additional reblogging feature on Kinja, its blog aggregator and discussion platform. Now each time Gawker readers re-blog or share articles on the platform, they can rewrite the headlines and lead paragraphs, Nieman Lab reports:

The reframing functionality…allows several versions of the same story to circulate under different headlines. So where one reader might write the headline “Cat Neckties Are Things That Exist; Are Popular,” another could share that original post but reframe it as “Nutty cat owners forcing pets to wear ‘cat neckties.’” An original post with the headline “The Truth About Being Broke” might be reframed as “How to survive being totally broke.”

Gawker CEO Nick Denton launched Kinja in 2004 and sees comments as content, not just noise attached to content. “The whole point of Kinja is to turn the conversation into news — on a grander scale than we do already on the Gawker blogs,” Denton told Nieman Lab. 

“For instance, say a story was written for gamers — they can translate it for a more general audience,” Denton said. “And, if that URL is shared, it is shared with the new headline and intro.”

So a reader gets to repurpose and share an article in whatever context she chooses, with the original article appearing in full below her headline and introduction, but the original story gets the traffic. Gawker editors can also snap up original reader contributions to Kinja, reframe them, and share those reader-generated posts with the wider Gawker network. Staffers can aggregate commenters; commenters can aggregate staffers; at some point, the distinctions start to dissolve.

Wresting this kind of editorial control from the professionals may make some journalists uneasy, but it’s already how people are interacting with content (and with one another) on other platforms. Denton calls Kinja “by far the most significant tech investment” that the company has ever made, with 30 tech staffers working full-time on the project for the past year.

Image: Kinja logo, Wikipedia

We will be vilified by the digital futurists, ridiculed by colleagues in our industry and fitted with a dunce cap by the trade media. In fact, some of the same will be heard in our own hallways. Much like our 40% increase in home delivery pricing in 2009, this strategy goes against the grain. But that’s okay. We’ve been there before.

We're Number 188! →

File under: at least you’re not a roustabout.

In its annual rankings of the 200 best and worst jobs in the US, CareerCast slots newspaper reporter in at 188.

Photojournalist comes in at 185.

Software Engineer claims the top spot.

Quick hit list via the WSJ. Detailed list via CareerCast.

Via Columbia Journalism School

Thirteen winners of the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards were announced today by Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Eight of this year’s recipients feature investigative reporting, including stories from ABC News and CBS News. Five local television stations will be honored, including KCET, Los Angeles. For the first time, a multimedia story from a print-based news organization will win a duPont Award. The Las Vegas Sun will be honored for multimedia reporting on gambling addiction.