Posts tagged with ‘journalism?’

It’s a credit to James O’Keefe that amid the diverse vocabulary in the English language, so many terms inadequately describe him and what he does.

Is he a provocateur, a prankster, an activist, a muckraker, a citizen journalist, an investigative journalist? Do we call these shaky videos undercover stings, gonzo journalism, political theater, political art? Does he take after Matt Drudge? Michael Moore? Julian Assange?

Yes.

Steve Myers, Managing Editor, Poynter.org, What James O’Keefe knows about media (and you should too).

Myers eventually settles on “entrapment journalism” and walks readers through the techniques O’Keefe used from his ACORN videos through the recent NPR release that ended with Vivian Schiller’s resignation.

Cosmo Maxim

Cosmo Versus Maxim

Darren Barefoot compares the cover copy of three years worth of Maxim and Cosmo magazines.

Venus, meet Mars. Mars, Venus. You seem to have one very particular thing in common.

Demand IPO's, Worth a Cool Billion →

Who says creating crap content isn’t valuable?

Demand Media, creators of mass amounts of content (read: content farm), went public and its shares immediately soared.

Via CNN Money:

The company trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol DMD (DMD). Shares were trading at $22.94 about two-and-a-half hours into trading, after touching a high of $25.

That gives Demand a valuation of $1.5 billion — more than the New York Times Co (NYT)., though less than other media stalwarts like Gannett Co. (GCI, Fortune 500) and Washington Post Co (WPO, Fortune 500).

That’s also the highest market capitalization for an Internet company since Google’s IPO in 2004, according to research firm Renaissance Capital.

Speaking of Google, it will be interesting to see how it adjusts their algorithms to escape Demand’s spammy SEO fu.

Meanwhile, shaking head.

Can You Make $100k Writing for a Content Farm?
Via AdvertisingAge:

When Jodi Jill was laid off from her position as an assistant at a car dealership two years ago, she took a number of odd jobs to pay the bills, from hawking oranges off the Venice exit on the 405 freeway in Southern California to fixing sequins onto costume dresses. She also wrote the occasional article for Examiner, the crowdsourced content play backed by billionaire investor Philip Anschutz.

Fast forward two years and Ms. Jill, who was briefly homeless after being laid off, says she’s made just under $100,000 in the past year by writing exclusively for Examiner.

Denver-based Examiner pays its writers anywhere from $1 to $7.50 for every thousand page views their posts generate, based on a black-box formula. The company has a roster of more than 60,000 contributors producing more than 3,000 articles a day.

In the case of Ms. Jill, she posts anywhere form 100 to 130 articles in a week, and though Examiner will not disclose Ms. Jill’s traffic or her rates, a bit of back-of-the-envelope calculation shows it’s entirely feasible.


Image: Rude Cow, John Haslam. Via Flickr/Creative Commons

Can You Make $100k Writing for a Content Farm?

Via AdvertisingAge:

When Jodi Jill was laid off from her position as an assistant at a car dealership two years ago, she took a number of odd jobs to pay the bills, from hawking oranges off the Venice exit on the 405 freeway in Southern California to fixing sequins onto costume dresses. She also wrote the occasional article for Examiner, the crowdsourced content play backed by billionaire investor Philip Anschutz.

Fast forward two years and Ms. Jill, who was briefly homeless after being laid off, says she’s made just under $100,000 in the past year by writing exclusively for Examiner.

Denver-based Examiner pays its writers anywhere from $1 to $7.50 for every thousand page views their posts generate, based on a black-box formula. The company has a roster of more than 60,000 contributors producing more than 3,000 articles a day.

In the case of Ms. Jill, she posts anywhere form 100 to 130 articles in a week, and though Examiner will not disclose Ms. Jill’s traffic or her rates, a bit of back-of-the-envelope calculation shows it’s entirely feasible.

Image: Rude Cow, John Haslam. Via Flickr/Creative Commons