Posts tagged journalists

Study says Journalists are Getting Less Respect

via Poynter

27 percent of Americans say journalists contribute little or nothing to society’s well being, according to a study by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life.

The percentage of Americans who say journalists contribute a lot to society has shrunk since 2009. The trend is particularly notable among women, 29 percent of whom said journalists contribute a lot. In 2009, 46 percent of women held high opinions of journalists.

Images: Polls conducted by Pew Research Center

As the deadliest country in the world for journalists right now, Syria provides an illustrative example of both the dangers that media professionals face in conflict zones and the importance of their roles in painting an accurate picture of the realities of the conflict on the ground.

Marie O’Reilly in her article “Protecting Journalists in Conflict Zones: Lessons from Syria" on Global Observatory discusses policies of journalist protection in conflict zones as well as the journalist’s difficulties of reporting accurately without that protection. 

Related: The Revolution is Being Televised, a documentary following activists who document the activities in Syria. 

Journalists Training With Soldiers

Every year since 1993, France welcomes journalists from all over the world to train with the French National Army. Why? To learn how to report while in a highly dangerous combat zone. Quentin Michaud, a journalist who took the training last year, wrote an article about the experience and highlighted learning relaxation methods as well as survival techniques. 

The course was featured in Quill, the Society of Professional Journalism’s magazine as well as on Reporters Without Borders

FJP: Although the video is in French, it still shows everything the journalists train to do. Runtime: 2:24.

I don’t get to complain anymore. It’s just true. Some of the most delicious time that you spend as a journalist is like, complaining. At no times have I had fewer actual friends to gossip with, and kind of complain with, or at least commiserate with. That is a hard part of being the boss. Newsrooms are just full of cantankerous complaining people. It’s so enjoyable to be part of that.
Jill Abramson, Executive Editor, The New York Times, about life as the boss. Capital New York, Editor Jill Abramson opens up about layoffs, the time she almost quit, and loneliness at the top.
Should people pay journalists and photojournalists to do what they do? As long as someone wants credible information the role of the professional remains important, but the role changes in that professionals are no longer the eyewitness. Think of all those [photography compilation] books in the 20th century which were called “eye witness” or “the eyes of the world” or something similar. That’s no longer relevant when there are 4 billion cellphone eyes out there.

Professionals are valuable as commentators, interpreters, validators. We know what is happening in Syria but for sifting all the detail and taking a position on all of that, we still look to the professionals.

Last year, during the Arab Spring, it was the “good little guy” against the “big bad guy”. Simple. Now, we are seeing is a much more complex mix of bad little guys as well a good little guys. I am learning all the different computations from experts — people who are studying the form, researching it, being present and reporting back out. That’s not something I can put together from Facebook. I need someone to guide me through that very complex area.
Stephen Mayes, Director, VII Photo Agency, in an interview with Wired. Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences.
Branding is not about growing inequality but growing equality. In the old world there were a few big-name hotshot star journalists, and a lot of regular hacks pushing anonymous news. In future more and more journalists will be stars — some big stars shining all over, some smaller but maybe brighter stars twinkling to some important niche audience. And if a journalist has no twinkle whatsoever — then it’s time to find something else to do.

Saska Saarikoski, Brands, Stars and Regular Hacks — a changing relationship between news institutions and journalists (PDF).

Saarikoski, a former culture editor at Finland’s Helsingin Sanomat, conducted surveys and interviews with editors, publishers and reporters about the issues raised by the branding of journalists. The result is this recent report from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Can I Make Stuff Up?
Fabrication, fiction, falsehood: see what you can do and when you can do it at Slate.

Can I Make Stuff Up?

Fabrication, fiction, falsehood: see what you can do and when you can do it at Slate.

Press Pass - Journalists on Twitter, organized by beat, media outlet, & region
From The Next Web:

Press Pass, a ’live directory’ of journalists from major publications, is a brand new Dubai-based site that comes to us courtesy of co-founders David Haddad, a product manager and software engineer, and Valencio Cardoso, an interactive designer.
The site lists journalists by region, beat or by publication, making it incredibly easy to find the journalist who can cover your story. Not only can you find out which journalists work at major publications and sites, you can connect with them through Twitter. You can also find out what they’re personally interested in, as Press Pass highlights the stories that they’re sharing through their Twitter feed.
The site analyzes each journalist’s tweets, creating a profile based on that content – including what they’re reading, topics they’re interested in and who they’re talking to. Each journalist is ranked based on the number of followers they have and their number of tweets.

From the Press Pass Web site:

Press Pass is an open live directory of journalists and media professionals organized by the outlets they work for and the beats and regions they cover.We track what journalists on Twitter are sharing, and show you what they’re reading, how they rank compared to others, the topics they care about, who gets their attention, and so on…
Every now and then ordinary people need to get the message out to the public. Be it an entrepreneur with a new product, a non-profit that wants to raise awareness for a cause, or a citizen with a great photo of a protest.Press Pass lets you discover reporters interested in your message so they can help you get the word out.

Ahem Press Pass….I don’t see The Future Journalism Project on your list of news organizations.

Press Pass - Journalists on Twitter, organized by beat, media outlet, & region

From The Next Web:

Press Pass, a ’live directory’ of journalists from major publications, is a brand new Dubai-based site that comes to us courtesy of co-founders David Haddad, a product manager and software engineer, and Valencio Cardoso, an interactive designer.

The site lists journalists by region, beat or by publication, making it incredibly easy to find the journalist who can cover your story. Not only can you find out which journalists work at major publications and sites, you can connect with them through Twitter. You can also find out what they’re personally interested in, as Press Pass highlights the stories that they’re sharing through their Twitter feed.

The site analyzes each journalist’s tweets, creating a profile based on that content – including what they’re reading, topics they’re interested in and who they’re talking to. Each journalist is ranked based on the number of followers they have and their number of tweets.

From the Press Pass Web site:

Press Pass is an open live directory of journalists and media professionals organized by the outlets they work for and the beats and regions they cover.

We track what journalists on Twitter are sharing, and show you what they’re reading, how they rank compared to others, the topics they care about, who gets their attention, and so on…

Every now and then ordinary people need to get the message out to the public. Be it an entrepreneur with a new product, a non-profit that wants to raise awareness for a cause, or a citizen with a great photo of a protest.

Press Pass lets you discover reporters interested in your message so they can help you get the word out.

Ahem Press Pass….I don’t see The Future Journalism Project on your list of news organizations.

Can I reliably trust you to tell me what is going on? If the answer is yes, then I don’t care if you work out of a newsroom or out of your garage.
Robert Hernandez, professor of new media at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. For journalism’s future, the killer app is credibility.

Blogger Fined $2.5 Million for not Being a Journalist

Over 40 states have shield laws that protect journalists from revealing information about the sources used during their reporting.

This is all well and good until you get into the tricky business of actually defining who a journalist is. Someone reporting for CNN? No brainer. Except for jaded, we all agree he or she is a journalist. 

But what about someone reporting for a new startup with a part time staff of three? Or the lone blogger who digs deep into one particular subject?

In Oregon, a judge has decided that shield laws only apply to those who are officially part of an established media organization (again, defining what that might mean leaves us scratching our heads).

Via the Seattle Weekly:

A U.S. District Court judge in Portland has drawn a line in the sand between “journalist” and “blogger.” And for Crystal Cox, a woman on the latter end of that comparison, the distinction has cost her $2.5 million…

…Cox runs several law-centric blogs, like industrywhistleblower.com, judicialhellhole.com, and obsidianfinancesucks.com, and was sued by investment firm Obsidian Finance Group in January for defamation, to the tune of $10 million, for writing several blog posts that were highly critical of the firm and its co-founder Kevin Padrick.

Representing herself in court, Cox had argued that her writing was a mixture of facts, commentary and opinion (like a million other blogs on the web) and moved to have the case dismissed. Dismissed it wasn’t, however, and after throwing out all but one of the blog posts cited by Obsidian Financial, the judge ruled that this single post was indeed defamatory because it was presented, essentially, as more factual in tone than her other posts, and therefore a reasonable person could conclude it was factual.

The judge ruled against Cox on that post and awarded $2.5 million to the investment firm.

Now here’s where the case gets more important: Cox argued in court that the reason her post was more factual was because she had an inside source that was leaking her information. And since Oregon is one of 40 U.S. states including Washington with media shield laws, Cox refused to divulge who her source was.

But without revealing her source Cox couldn’t prove that the statements she’d made in her post were true and therefore not defamation, or attribute them to her source and transfer the liability…

…The judge in Cox’s case, however, ruled that the woman did not qualify for shield-law protection not because of anything she wrote, but because she wasn’t employed by an official media establishment.

From the opinion by U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez:

… although defendant is a self-proclaimed “investigative blogger” and defines herself as “media,” the record fails to show that she is affiliated with any newspaper, magazine, periodical, book, pamphlet, news service, wire service, news or feature syndicate, broadcast station or network, or cable television system. Thus, she is not entitled to the protections of the law.

Who Are These Journalists

A new site called News Transparency is trying to bring transparency to journalists by publishing basic biographical information, recent stories and social media presences.

Via Poynter:

Ira Stoll is 38. He has a Facebook page and a Twitter account. His phone number is (718) 499-2199 and his email is ira@futureofcapitalism.com. He went to college at Harvard, has worked at the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal and New York Sun, and he considers Seth Lipsky a personal friend.

I know all this from Stoll’s profile page on NewsTransparency.com, a new site he just launched to make it easier for the public “to find out about the individual human beings who produce the news — human beings with opinions, relationships, history, and agendas.”

The site consists of journalist profile pages which, like Wikipedia, allow anyone to add information and, like Amazon, enable ratings and reviews. They also collect articles written about the journalist’s work.

If you’re familiar with Techcrunch’s Crunchbase, the idea should be familiar: Create a publicly accessible database that lets anyone learn more about the movers and shakers in a given field.

Created by Ira Stoll, News Transparency hopes to build trust between the public and journalists. Let’s see what happens when the journalists find their digital paper trail easy to find and read.

Why I Write: Q. and A. With Seven Times Journalists

Seven Times reporters from a variety of beats told us what they write, how, and why — even if, for at least one of them, the storytelling is more often done through multimedia than words.

via NY Times

How Journalists Use the Internet
Sixty-four percent of journalists say they spend more than 20 hours a week online, with 21 percent reporting more than 40 hours of online activity each week. 
Via the 2011 Arketi Web Watch Media Survey. Arketi is a PR firm.

How Journalists Use the Internet

Sixty-four percent of journalists say they spend more than 20 hours a week online, with 21 percent reporting more than 40 hours of online activity each week. 

Via the 2011 Arketi Web Watch Media Survey. Arketi is a PR firm.