posts about or somewhat related to ‘latin america’

fjp-latinamerica:

Spanish: now the second most popular language on Twitter
Spanish is now the second-most-used language on Twitter, only after English, according to Spain’s Cervantes Institute.


Despite this “spectacular” evolution, the potential growth of  Spanish-speaking users continues to be outstanding given that more than 60 percent of Latin Americans do not have access the Web.


Spanish is the third most-used language on the Internet and ranks second in the ‘offline’ world, with 500 million speakers, only behind Chinese.
Image: Twitter en Español

Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr and Twitter.

fjp-latinamerica:

Spanish: now the second most popular language on Twitter

Spanish is now the second-most-used language on Twitter, only after English, according to Spain’s Cervantes Institute.

Despite this “spectacular” evolution, the potential growth of  Spanish-speaking users continues to be outstanding given that more than 60 percent of Latin Americans do not have access the Web.

Spanish is the third most-used language on the Internet and ranks second in the ‘offline’ world, with 500 million speakers, only behind Chinese.

Image: Twitter en Español

Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr and Twitter.

fjp-latinamerica:

Tracking peace talks in real time
If you are interested in following the Colombian government peace talks with the FARC guerrilla, you shouldn’t miss DialogosPorLaPaz. 
This website is dedicated to covering the unfolding negotiations between the government and the leftist guerrilla to end the 50 year old conflict between the rebels and the Colombian federal forces.
One of the most remarkable features of this project is how it incorporates the opinion of citizens around the dialogue, something that most of the traditional media outlets have been missing. 
DialogosPorLaPaz also measures the sentiment and perceptions of the people around the peace talks through a quantitative index that includes opinions expressed through social media and a series of web-based polls hosted in the website.
FJP: Although it’s clear that DialogosPorLaPaz focuses on citizens, we think that it would be very useful if it had official information about where the peace talks stands. This would serve as a reference to what citizens are reporting and commenting.
Image: DialogosPorLaPaz screenshot.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

Tracking peace talks in real time

If you are interested in following the Colombian government peace talks with the FARC guerrilla, you shouldn’t miss DialogosPorLaPaz

This website is dedicated to covering the unfolding negotiations between the government and the leftist guerrilla to end the 50 year old conflict between the rebels and the Colombian federal forces.

One of the most remarkable features of this project is how it incorporates the opinion of citizens around the dialogue, something that most of the traditional media outlets have been missing. 

DialogosPorLaPaz also measures the sentiment and perceptions of the people around the peace talks through a quantitative index that includes opinions expressed through social media and a series of web-based polls hosted in the website.

FJP: Although it’s clear that DialogosPorLaPaz focuses on citizens, we think that it would be very useful if it had official information about where the peace talks stands. This would serve as a reference to what citizens are reporting and commenting.

Image: DialogosPorLaPaz screenshot.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

Bienvenidos a FJP Latin America
Ever since we launched the Future Journalism Project we’ve tried to cover important media developments around the world. This is hard though. Our sources when doing so are primarily in English so we miss out on the nuance and important local stories that occur every day.
This summer we decided to do something about it: globalize.
And today we’re psyched to announce the launch of FJP Latin America. (Follow on Tumblr. Follow on Twitter).
Edited by José L. Leyva and Roberto Juárez-Garza, FJP Latin America will focus on media, journalism, society and technology from Mexico to Tierra Del Fuego with relevant linkages to Spain and the Latino communities in the US and Canada. We’ll do so by monitoring Spanish-language media and other primary sources, translating them into English, and then commenting upon and analyzing what we find (again, in English) for the non-Spanish speakers among us.
José is a Fulbright Scholar working around the clock at the intersection of technology, journalism and politics. He has two master’s degrees from Columbia University, one in journalism and digital media at the Graduate School of Journalism and another in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs. He is based in Mexico City. (Follow José on Twitter).
Roberto holds a master’s degree in International Studies from the University of Washington with a dual concentration on Latin America and international communications. After spending 7 years in Seattle working as a communications strategist and volunteering for a handful of local non-profits, he is now based in Monterrey, Mexico. (Follow Roberto on Twitter and Google+).
We’ve been working on this behind the scenes and if you visit FJP Latin America you can learn about:
How violence against journalists has forced a Mexican University to shut down its undergraduate journalism program.
An Open Source bus tour’s 5,000 mile journey through South America promoting freedom of expression.
Univision’s attempts to get a Latino to moderate a US Presidential debate.
There’s much much more of course. And there will be much much more. 
Contributors Welcome
Latin America is an exceptionally large and diverse place. If you’re interested in being a part of this initiative, José and Roberto are putting together a team of contributors from countries throughout the region. You can get in touch via the contact info below. You can also submit individual stories, images, links and video via the Submit Page.
If you have tips, queries, suggestions or any other questions, email us at LatAm [at] theFJP [dot] org, or hit us up in the FJP Latin America Ask Box.
We’re super excited about this launch and give José and Roberto giant abrazos for joining the FJP. — Michael
Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr  Follow FJP Latin America on Twitter
And if you haven’t, follow the FJP (and on Twitter we’re over here).

Bienvenidos a FJP Latin America

Ever since we launched the Future Journalism Project we’ve tried to cover important media developments around the world. This is hard though. Our sources when doing so are primarily in English so we miss out on the nuance and important local stories that occur every day.

This summer we decided to do something about it: globalize.

And today we’re psyched to announce the launch of FJP Latin America. (Follow on Tumblr. Follow on Twitter).

Edited by José L. Leyva and Roberto Juárez-Garza, FJP Latin America will focus on media, journalism, society and technology from Mexico to Tierra Del Fuego with relevant linkages to Spain and the Latino communities in the US and Canada. We’ll do so by monitoring Spanish-language media and other primary sources, translating them into English, and then commenting upon and analyzing what we find (again, in English) for the non-Spanish speakers among us.

José is a Fulbright Scholar working around the clock at the intersection of technology, journalism and politics. He has two master’s degrees from Columbia University, one in journalism and digital media at the Graduate School of Journalism and another in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs. He is based in Mexico City. (Follow José on Twitter).

Roberto holds a master’s degree in International Studies from the University of Washington with a dual concentration on Latin America and international communications. After spending 7 years in Seattle working as a communications strategist and volunteering for a handful of local non-profits, he is now based in Monterrey, Mexico. (Follow Roberto on Twitter and Google+).

We’ve been working on this behind the scenes and if you visit FJP Latin America you can learn about:

There’s much much more of course. And there will be much much more. 

Contributors Welcome

Latin America is an exceptionally large and diverse place. If you’re interested in being a part of this initiative, José and Roberto are putting together a team of contributors from countries throughout the region. You can get in touch via the contact info below. You can also submit individual stories, images, links and video via the Submit Page.

If you have tips, queries, suggestions or any other questions, email us at LatAm [at] theFJP [dot] org, or hit us up in the FJP Latin America Ask Box.

We’re super excited about this launch and give José and Roberto giant abrazos for joining the FJP. — Michael

Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr
Follow FJP Latin America on Twitter

And if you haven’t, follow the FJP (and on Twitter we’re over here).

Killing journalists doesn’t kill the truth.

Demonstrators outside the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa, Honduras protesting the murder of more than 20 journalists in that country over the last three years.

None of the murders have been solved.

Press Freedom: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly →

Via the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas:

Less than 15 percent of the world’s population lives in a country with a full free press — the lowest level in more than a decade, according to Freedom House’s new report, Freedom of the Press 2012, released Tuesday, May 1. The global press freedom rankings were released to coincide with the May 3 celebration of World Press Freedom Day.

In general, the report found that, for the first time in eight years, worldwide media freedom did not decline overall. Still, of the 197 countries and territories examined, only 33.5 percent (66) were rated as “free.” The number of “partly free” countries increased to 72 (36.5 percent), and 59 (30 percent) were rated “not free.” Most of the world’s population (45 percent) lives in a country with a “partly free” press, the report showed. The rankings are based on the level of freedom in three categories: legal, political, and economic.

While the rest of the world saw no real decline in press freedom — and even improved in the Arab world — in the Americas, press freedom deteriorated in 2011, the report said. Both Chile and Guyana moved from “free” to “partly free,” and Ecuador’s overall numeric score declined significantly. Press freedom remained restricted in Venezuela and Cuba, and extreme danger for journalists in Mexico also hurt that country’s press freedom scores — both Mexico and Honduras remained listed as “not free” (see these Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas maps on press attacks in Mexico and Central America) While the United States continues to have one of the freer presses in the region, it, too, saw a slight decline because of arrests and harassment of journalists covering the Occupy movement.

Read on for more.