Posts tagged with ‘lawsuits’

Ninjas, News and Politics
Iran has suspended Reuters’ accreditation in the country over a story the news agency ran on Iranian women practicing the art of ninjutsu. 
At issue is wording in the Reuters report that called the women “ninja assassins” with the perceived implication that they’re training to protect the country from Western infidels.
In a statement, Reuters writes:

The story’s headline, “Thousands of female Ninjas train as Iran’s assassins”, was corrected to read “Three thousand women Ninjas train in Iran”.
Iran’s Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance subsequently contacted the Reuters Tehran bureau chief about the video and its publication, as a result of which Reuters’ 11 personnel were told to hand back their press cards.
"We acknowledge this error occurred and regard it as a very serious matter. It was promptly corrected the same day it came to our attention," said editor-in-chief Stephen J. Adler.

Meantime, some of the women are suing Reuters for misrepresenting them.
"Reuters has introduced us as assassins to the whole world," says one. ”The truth must come to light and everyone should know that we are only a group of athletes. We are supervised by the Ministry of Sports and the federation of martial arts.”
Background via The Atlantic.
Image: A Ninjutsu practitioner performs a split as members of various Ninjutsu schools showcase their skills to the media in a gym at Karaj, near Tehran. By Caren Firouz, via Reuters.

Ninjas, News and Politics

Iran has suspended Reuters’ accreditation in the country over a story the news agency ran on Iranian women practicing the art of ninjutsu. 

At issue is wording in the Reuters report that called the women “ninja assassins” with the perceived implication that they’re training to protect the country from Western infidels.

In a statement, Reuters writes:

The story’s headline, “Thousands of female Ninjas train as Iran’s assassins”, was corrected to read “Three thousand women Ninjas train in Iran”.

Iran’s Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance subsequently contacted the Reuters Tehran bureau chief about the video and its publication, as a result of which Reuters’ 11 personnel were told to hand back their press cards.

"We acknowledge this error occurred and regard it as a very serious matter. It was promptly corrected the same day it came to our attention," said editor-in-chief Stephen J. Adler.

Meantime, some of the women are suing Reuters for misrepresenting them.

"Reuters has introduced us as assassins to the whole world," says one. ”The truth must come to light and everyone should know that we are only a group of athletes. We are supervised by the Ministry of Sports and the federation of martial arts.”

Background via The Atlantic.

Image: A Ninjutsu practitioner performs a split as members of various Ninjutsu schools showcase their skills to the media in a gym at Karaj, near Tehran. By Caren Firouz, via Reuters.

Being Mark Zuckerberg

Old Mark Zuckerberg, meet the new Mark Zuckerberg. You’re now free to sue yourselves.

Via Slashdot:

Facebook disabled the account of Israeli entrepreneur Rotem Guez because he runs a business called the Like Store, where he sold Likes to advertisers. Guez countered by suing Facebook for deleting his accounts on the social network. Facebook countered with its own cease and desist letter. Guez didn’t respond to Facebook’s demands. Instead, he legally changed his name to Mark Zuckerberg. ‘If you want to sue me, you’re going to have to sue Mark Zuckerberg,’ Guez reportedly told Facebook.

Full story is on ZDNet.

Class Action Suit Against Huffington Post →

Via the New York Times:

The Huffington Post is the target of a multimillion dollar lawsuit filed in United States District Court in New York on Tuesday on behalf of thousands of uncompensated bloggers.

The suit seeks at least $105 million in damages for more than 9,000 writers.

The case raises significant unsettled questions about the rights of writers in the digital age and, at the very least, promises to offer a palette of colorful characters on each side.

Paul Allen Wants His Links Back →

You know how just about every site has related links at the end of an article, or related products after an item? Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen wants a piece of that action.

Via paidContent:

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has refiled his patent lawsuit against 11 big internet companies and e-retailers, and the new complaint details just how broad Allen’s claim to basic internet functionality is. In a 35-page amended complaint [PDF] filed Tuesday, Allen’s lawyers detail how certain functions that are widely used in digital media—acts as simple as suggesting related links, offering various forms of “alerts,” or making suggestions of related products for purchase—stand accused of infringing the four patents Allen has used in this lawsuit.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Interval Licensing, a patent-holding company set up to file lawsuits based on patents that were originally filed in the 1990s by Interval Research, a laboratory funded by Allen that closed its doors in 2000. Eleven companies stand accused of infringing Paul Allen’s patent rights: AOL, Apple, eBay, Facebook, Google, Netflix, Office Depot, OfficeMax, Staples, Yahoo, and YouTube…

…To call the accused features “widely used” web publishing functions would be an understatement. If patent claims on such basic ideas are found to be valid, there are surely hundreds of other potential defendants that could be sued by Interval Licensing. Paul Allen would be essentially a tax collector for the internet.

Allen and his lawyers are asking for damages, as well as an injunction that either shuts down the services or forces the defendants to pay Allen an ongoing royalty to continue using them.