Posts tagged licensing

Your Low Cost, No Cost & Creative Commons Guide to Licensing Music
Andreas Silenzi, Managing Director of the Free Music Archive, has a very handy Google spreadsheet that lists sound sources you can explore for your next media project.
These range from those with Creative Commons licenses to ones that are simply free to use to others that have rather nominal charges but are generally royalty free.
Check it: Free Music Archive Guide to Online Audio Resources.

Your Low Cost, No Cost & Creative Commons Guide to Licensing Music

Andreas Silenzi, Managing Director of the Free Music Archive, has a very handy Google spreadsheet that lists sound sources you can explore for your next media project.

These range from those with Creative Commons licenses to ones that are simply free to use to others that have rather nominal charges but are generally royalty free.

Check it: Free Music Archive Guide to Online Audio Resources.

Doing News Right? The AP's New Licensing Venture

The Associated Press, along with 28 other news organizations, launched NewsRight yesterday. The goal is license member content out to commercial aggregators.

Included in the service is an analytics suite that NewsRight’s creators says will let publishers understand what’s happening with their content. Via a NewsRight press release:

NewsRight will make it easy for publishers and third parties to access and use these data in editorial, marketing, advertising, public relations and other contexts involving the analysis of news events. Using the News Registry, a content measurement system developed at the Associated Press, NewsRight currently measures several billion impressions a month on news content from participating publishers. NewsRight participants and clients will receive real-time measurements about news patterns and how registered content is being used across digital platforms.

Over at Poynter, Rick Edmonds points out that NewsRight has competitors such as the older non-profit Copyright Clearance Center and the newer Attributor, but believes the move is putting the industry on track for a comprehensive paid digital content strategy:

Should NewsRight catch on big, as it founders hope, the industry will have in place a second leg to a paid digital content strategy. Paywalls and bundled print/digital subscriptions had a snowballing adoption curve in 2011 that will continue into this year. The New York Times metered model and its variations essentially ask heavy direct users of news websites to pay some of the cost of generating content.

NewsRight aims to apply the same strategy to aggregators, targeting those who make heavy (and commercial) use of content originated elsewhere. They are being asked to become payers rather than free riders.

Today, in Bad Ideas: A Tiered Press System

Via National Post:

Quebec’s Culture Minister, Christine St.-Pierre, has floated the creation of “a new model of regulation of Quebec media.” At the heart of the project is legislation that would define the “status of professional journalists.” The stated intention is to distinguish those dedicated to “serving the public interest” from “amateur bloggers.” Those admitted to the rank of professional journalist would enjoy unspecified “advantages or privileges,” such as “better access to government sources.”

This project strikes us as alarming on many levels. Even though journalism schools exist, journalism itself is an unregulated profession, unlike, say, dentistry or law. And that is a good thing. The basic rules of reportage can be taught, but the ability to rapidly synthesize disparate pieces of information into an intelligible, easily digested whole is the fruit of individual talent, curiosity, insight and ambition coupled with on-the-job apprenticeship.

Not a single member of the National Post’s editorial board went to journalism school; we suspect the same is true of many major newspaper editorial boards in the country. Nor do we have any sort of government accreditation, because, thankfully, none is necessary. We migrated into writing because we were drawn to the craft - not by passing some test or official designation supplied by a trade group or agency.

And whatever Ms. St. Pierre may think, blogging is not a disreputable occupation: Many professional journalists today get into the highly competitive market by self-publishing on the Internet in one way or another. Amateur bloggers - “citizen journalists” - should be encouraged, not chilled.

Read through for the rest of National Post’s response… and then follow their Tumblr.