Posts tagged with ‘long form journalism’

'New York Times' Creating Digital Longform Magazine →

The New York Time'slatest adventure in the longform world is a new digital-only magazine. Jill Ambramson, executive editor of NYT, sent a letter to her colleagues which highlighted shifts in responsibility within NYT. She wrote:

[…] part of my strategic push to have the newsroom take a leading role in developing new ways to present our journalism in digital forms and to create new products.

Former national editor Sam Sifton will now be the senior editor in change of the longform project. 

His first assignment is to create an immersive digital magazine experience, a lean back read that will include new, multimedia narratives in the tradition of Snow Fall and last weekend’s compelling account of the Arizona fire, as well as some of the best reads published during the previous week.

MATTER: We've launched! →

readmatter:

Earlier this year, 2,566 people did something remarkable: they backed our idea for MATTER on Kickstarter. We’d asked for help in creating a new home for high-quality journalism, and the response was extraordinary: we passed our $50,000 target in less than 48 hours and finished on $140,000,…

Matter, almost single-handedly proving there’s an appetite for long-form journalism and -shock horror- people are ready to pay for quality.

(via readmatter-deactivated20140804)

theatlantic:

Yes, America, We Have Executed an Innocent Man

At 11 p.m Monday, the Columbia University Human Rights Review published and posted its Spring 2012 issue — devoted entirely to a single piece of work about the life and death of two troubled and troublesome South Texas men. In explaining to their readers why an entire issue would be devoted to just one story, the editors of the Review said straightly that the “gravity of the subject matter of the Article and the possible far-reaching policy ramifications of its publication necessitated this decision.” […]
The Review article is an astonishing blend of narrative journalism, legal research, and gumshoe detective work. And it ought to end all reasonable debate in this country about whether an innocent man or woman has yet been executed in America since the modern capital punishment regime was recognized by the Supreme Court in 1976. The article is also a clear and powerful retort to Justice Scalia in Kansas v. Marsh: Our capital cases don’t have nearly the procedural safeguards he wants to pretend they do.
Read more. [Image: Corpus Christi Police Department]

theatlantic:

Yes, America, We Have Executed an Innocent Man

At 11 p.m Monday, the Columbia University Human Rights Review published and posted its Spring 2012 issue — devoted entirely to a single piece of work about the life and death of two troubled and troublesome South Texas men. In explaining to their readers why an entire issue would be devoted to just one story, the editors of the Review said straightly that the “gravity of the subject matter of the Article and the possible far-reaching policy ramifications of its publication necessitated this decision.” […]

The Review article is an astonishing blend of narrative journalism, legal research, and gumshoe detective work. And it ought to end all reasonable debate in this country about whether an innocent man or woman has yet been executed in America since the modern capital punishment regime was recognized by the Supreme Court in 1976. The article is also a clear and powerful retort to Justice Scalia in Kansas v. Marsh: Our capital cases don’t have nearly the procedural safeguards he wants to pretend they do.

Read more. [Image: Corpus Christi Police Department]

Excerpt of Jeff Sonderman of Poynter article called “New iPad app aggregates only long-form journalism”

The Longform iPad app aggregates editors’ picks of long-form journalism from Longform.org, as well as long stories from 25 sites known for such work, including The Atlantic, Slate, Mother Jones, and Esquire.  
The essential role of an aggregator is to make choices for readers, usually about which topics, sources or issues are worth paying attention to. A new aggregation and reading app launching Wednesday for the iPad holds a different standard — length.
For most sources, the cutoff is 2,000 words, Longform co-founder Max Linsky told me, though editors can exercise discretion to include a great 1,500-word story or cut out a 4,000-word item that doesn’t belong.

you can check out the whole article at Poynter. I think it’s a great idea to highlight long form writing but the app is $4.99 and I wonder is the news companies are getting any of that.  ~Chao. 

Excerpt of Jeff Sonderman of Poynter article called “New iPad app aggregates only long-form journalism”

The Longform iPad app aggregates editors’ picks of long-form journalism from Longform.org, as well as long stories from 25 sites known for such work, including The Atlantic, Slate, Mother Jones, and Esquire.  

The essential role of an aggregator is to make choices for readers, usually about which topics, sources or issues are worth paying attention to. A new aggregation and reading app launching Wednesday for the iPad holds a different standard — length.

For most sources, the cutoff is 2,000 words, Longform co-founder Max Linsky told me, though editors can exercise discretion to include a great 1,500-word story or cut out a 4,000-word item that doesn’t belong.

you can check out the whole article at Poynter. I think it’s a great idea to highlight long form writing but the app is $4.99 and I wonder is the news companies are getting any of that.  ~Chao. 

Does Longform Journalism Fit Your News Diet? →

WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show brought on ProPublica managing editor Steve Engelberg and Frontline’s Raney Aronson to explore longform journalism, and whether we have the patience, attention span and appetite for it.

Audience aside, can longform, investigative journalism be sustainable when a single story can cost anywhere from $50,000 to a half million dollars.

Listen on WNYC or download the MP3 here.

Run Time: 33 minutes (hey, it’s longform).

utnereader:

Long-form journalism—nuanced, rigorous, eloquent, and reasonable—is a mode of writing quickly being swept into the ashy dustbin of history.
The previous sentence, punctuation included, is 140 characters long, which is the maximum length of a tweet and—according to media scholars, news anchors, and frustrated teachers—the maximum attention span of anyone with a computer. Facebook status updates, overflowing RSS feeds, and smartphones are symptoms of a deeper malady, a hunger to consume more and more information. It would seem that painstakingly-crafted essays and deeply-researched journalism stand no chance in this hyperactive environment.
On the contrary, Wired’s Clive Thompson argues that info-nibbles like status updates, tweets, and news briefs increase our appetite for in-depth, long-form writing.

utnereader:

Long-form journalism—nuanced, rigorous, eloquent, and reasonable—is a mode of writing quickly being swept into the ashy dustbin of history.

The previous sentence, punctuation included, is 140 characters long, which is the maximum length of a tweet and—according to media scholars, news anchors, and frustrated teachers—the maximum attention span of anyone with a computer. Facebook status updates, overflowing RSS feeds, and smartphones are symptoms of a deeper malady, a hunger to consume more and more information. It would seem that painstakingly-crafted essays and deeply-researched journalism stand no chance in this hyperactive environment.

On the contrary, Wired’s Clive Thompson argues that info-nibbles like status updates, tweets, and news briefs increase our appetite for in-depth, long-form writing.