Posts tagged long reads

theatlantic:

Yes, America, We Have Executed an Innocent Man

At 11 p.m Monday, the Columbia University Human Rights Review published and posted its Spring 2012 issue — devoted entirely to a single piece of work about the life and death of two troubled and troublesome South Texas men. In explaining to their readers why an entire issue would be devoted to just one story, the editors of the Review said straightly that the “gravity of the subject matter of the Article and the possible far-reaching policy ramifications of its publication necessitated this decision.” […]
The Review article is an astonishing blend of narrative journalism, legal research, and gumshoe detective work. And it ought to end all reasonable debate in this country about whether an innocent man or woman has yet been executed in America since the modern capital punishment regime was recognized by the Supreme Court in 1976. The article is also a clear and powerful retort to Justice Scalia in Kansas v. Marsh: Our capital cases don’t have nearly the procedural safeguards he wants to pretend they do.
Read more. [Image: Corpus Christi Police Department]

theatlantic:

Yes, America, We Have Executed an Innocent Man

At 11 p.m Monday, the Columbia University Human Rights Review published and posted its Spring 2012 issue — devoted entirely to a single piece of work about the life and death of two troubled and troublesome South Texas men. In explaining to their readers why an entire issue would be devoted to just one story, the editors of the Review said straightly that the “gravity of the subject matter of the Article and the possible far-reaching policy ramifications of its publication necessitated this decision.” […]

The Review article is an astonishing blend of narrative journalism, legal research, and gumshoe detective work. And it ought to end all reasonable debate in this country about whether an innocent man or woman has yet been executed in America since the modern capital punishment regime was recognized by the Supreme Court in 1976. The article is also a clear and powerful retort to Justice Scalia in Kansas v. Marsh: Our capital cases don’t have nearly the procedural safeguards he wants to pretend they do.

Read more. [Image: Corpus Christi Police Department]

The Future of Technology and Computing

Get ready for some serious reading. The New York Times has a new special out called Future of Computing. Here are just the first few articles in the series:

Power in Numbers: China Aims for High-Tech Primacy
China’s booming economy and growing technological infrastructure may thrust it to the forefront of the next generation of computing, many American experts say.

Creating Artificial Intelligence Based on the Real Thing
Facing the physical limits of conventional design, researchers work to design a computing architecture that more closely resembles that of the brain.

Vast and Fertile Ground in Africa for Science to Take Root
Computer science study in Africa shows great promise, with one Ugandan university even charting its own course in many aspects of mobile computing ahead of the developed world.

With a Leaner Model, Start-Ups Reach Further Afield
The business of Silicon Valley today is less about focusing on an industry than it is about a continuous process of innovation with technology, across a widening swath of fields.

A High-Stakes Search Continues for Silicon’s Successor
As silicon processors grow more packed with each generation, they lose efficiency, and researchers are looking for a new medium.

Out of a Writer’s Imagination Came an Interactive World
The author Neal Stephenson’s reputation for prescience about the online world is well earned, even if he regards it lightly.

Looking Backward to Put New Technologies in Focus
The science historian George Dyson, author of the new book “Turing’s Cathedral,” talks about the genius of Alan Turing and John von Neumann, and growing up in the birthplace of the H-bomb.

Interactive Map
In just four decades the Internet has spread to much of the world. Now, the shift to high-bandwidth connectivity and the global availability of supercomputing is accelerating. Examine the global hotspots.

Looking forward to reading these and the many, many more.

Far from being an outlier, Roger Ailes fits snugly in an American tradition of partisan and skeezy journalism. As the owner and captain of his own media empire, William Randolph Hearst bent the news to suit his political ambitions for five decades. His vilification of President Franklin D. Roosevelt makes Fox News’ harassment of President Obama look like patty-cake. Robert R. McCormick, owner and publisher of the Chicago Tribune, ran headlines like “Moscow Orders Reds in U.S. to Back Roosevelt.”

The tradition of an American media owner or boss pushing a candidate or a cause is so firmly ensconced in journalistic history that the true outlier is the mogul who plays it completely straight. Walter Annenberg used his Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News to smear opponents and reward his political friends, facts be damned. The Manchester Union Leader’s William Loeb (subscription required) hammered liberal Democrats as “left-wing kooks” and called President John Kennedy “the No. 1 liar in the United States.” Nelson Rockefeller, in Loeb’s eyes, was a “wife-swapper,” and President Dwight Eisenhower was a “stinking hypocrite.”

Jack Shafer, Slate. Who’s Afraid of Roger Ailes? Rolling Stone and New York magazine publish dueling takes on Fox News Channel Chairman Roger Ailes.

The Rolling Stone article is a long read (about 10,000 words).

The New York magazine one is less long (about 6,400 words).

Both are interesting explorations of Ailes and the Fox News operation. File under: Weekend Reading. And if you only have time for one, head Schafer’s advice, “If you enjoy a scary nighttime story, read Dickinson’s [Rolling Stone] piece. But if your tastes run toward political comedy, click on Sherman’s.”