Posts tagged with ‘macgyver’

pulitzerfieldnotes:

“A portable photo studio on a shoestring in Sambo Creek, Honduras.” — Image by David Rochkind via Instagram (@drochkind). Honduras, 2013.
Pulitzer Center grantees David Rochkind and Jens Erik Gould are in the field reporting on the Garifuna, an Afro-Caribbean people in Honduras with a unique language and culture, who are fighting the highest rate of HIV in the western hemisphere. See more of their field notes here and a Storify of their social media posts here.

FJP: And that’s how you do it.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

“A portable photo studio on a shoestring in Sambo Creek, Honduras.” — Image by David Rochkind via Instagram (@drochkind). Honduras, 2013.

Pulitzer Center grantees David Rochkind and Jens Erik Gould are in the field reporting on the Garifuna, an Afro-Caribbean people in Honduras with a unique language and culture, who are fighting the highest rate of HIV in the western hemisphere. See more of their field notes here and a Storify of their social media posts here.

FJP: And that’s how you do it.

The Economist + Pressly + Tumblr = Electionism

The Economist recently launched a 2012 presidential HTML5 site for tablets called Electionism and uses a nifty bit of MacGyvering to get it done.

It appears the Economist Group Media Lab is using Tumblr as a backend where they curate content from various news sources. These feed into Pressly, a startup that pulls RSS feeds and Twitter posts, and extracts the content contained within links for magazine-style tablet display.

Pictured above are various screens from a tablet display and includes the Electionism Home, Category, Twitter and articles. The site currently works on the iPad, Galaxy Tab and Kindle Fire.

Interested in following the actual Electionism Tumblr? That’s over here.

Select images to embiggen.

H/T: Journalism.co.uk.

Using Twitter, Virginia Tech’s College Newspaper Kept On Publishing
Via the New York Times:

In 2007, The Collegiate Times did not have a tool for publishing real-time updates and informing fellow students about what they had reported. On Thursday, the newspaper’s Twitter account, @collegiatetimes, was providing updates every few minutes, quickly becoming a source for information about the shooting and the response on campus as students and staff members were locked down during the afternoon.
Twitter became even more critical when the newspaper’s Web site crashed and the staff was evacuated from the newspaper office and moved to a secured area. (The paper’s Web site redirected to the Twitter feed.) The editors also posted Twitter updates on the newspaper’s Facebook page.

Using Twitter, Virginia Tech’s College Newspaper Kept On Publishing

Via the New York Times:

In 2007, The Collegiate Times did not have a tool for publishing real-time updates and informing fellow students about what they had reported. On Thursday, the newspaper’s Twitter account, @collegiatetimes, was providing updates every few minutes, quickly becoming a source for information about the shooting and the response on campus as students and staff members were locked down during the afternoon.

Twitter became even more critical when the newspaper’s Web site crashed and the staff was evacuated from the newspaper office and moved to a secured area. (The paper’s Web site redirected to the Twitter feed.) The editors also posted Twitter updates on the newspaper’s Facebook page.

As Libyan rebels entered Tripoli yesterday, Sky News reporter Alex Crawford appeared to be the only Western broadcast reporter on the scene.

How’d she do it? How’d she broadcast from the capital?

According to the Daily Telegraph “the astonishing footage from the streets of Tripoli was produced using an Apple Mac Pro laptop computer connected to a mini-satellite dish that was charged by a car cigarette lighter socket.”

Somewhere MacGyver is smiling.

This morning in awesome.
New York Times photographer Doug Mills shoots stills and video for the paper. Here’s his latest contraption that lets him do so simultaneously. 
The still camera is on the bottom with the video camera connected via a micro ball head with a hot shoe mount.
Mills calls his creation the “Times-Two”.
Source.

This morning in awesome.

New York Times photographer Doug Mills shoots stills and video for the paper. Here’s his latest contraption that lets him do so simultaneously. 

The still camera is on the bottom with the video camera connected via a micro ball head with a hot shoe mount.

Mills calls his creation the “Times-Two”.

Source.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter
That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.
Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.
The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:
Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.
If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.

Correcting Errors Via Twitter

That misinformation can spread at lightning speed across social networks is a contemporary fact of life. News organizations — and those that watch them — have long tried to figure out how to correct errors post-publishing in a world where an initial misguided tweet takes on a life of its own in a spiral of retweets.

Paul Bradshaw of the Online Journalism Blog wrestled up an interesting hack to address the issue. After seeing reports that News of the World could destroy incriminating evidence against it once it shut down, he created @autodebunker in order to counter the information.

The idea here was to automate feedback to those retweeting information that had been debunked. His MacGyvered solution:

  1. Create Twitter Account - in this case, @autodebunker
  2. Grab RSS feed for Twitter posts that need debunking - done via Twitter advanced search
  3. Create new RSS feed with Feedburner - This gives you some flexibility with the feed parameters
  4. Use the Twitterfeed app to auto-publish your debunking - after all, you can’t manually chase down every retweet.

If interested in doing the same, check out Bradshaw’s post where he explains each of the steps above. It’s not a foolproof solution, and obviously can’t tackle all the errors we find online, but it is a neat hack to counter the misinformation that bugs you.