Posts tagged magazines

Sign of the Times
My brother Peter came across this magazine while stocking up for July 4th weekend. — Michael

Sign of the Times

My brother Peter came across this magazine while stocking up for July 4th weekend. — Michael

Recently, In Advertising
"There are things in there editors won’t like, and things in there that publishers won’t like," a Condé Nast editor tells AdAge about the company’s decision to formalize its native advertising policies.
An approximately 4,000-word internal document is currently circulating the company, AdAge reports, that “not only delves into advertising but also provides standards and practices around certain legal and privacy concerns, including how the company will handle consumer data.”
Condé Nast includes publications such as Wired, Vogue, The New Yorker and Vanity Fair among many others.
Other large publishers, such as Hearst (Cosmo and Esquire) and Time, Inc (Time, People and Sports Illustrated), are sticking to more general guidelines and making case-by-case decisions on native ads and their formats.
Meantime, Time magazine and Sports Illustrated are breaking a magazine industry taboo by selling advertising on the covers of their print editions.
As The New York Times notes:

[T]he Time and Sports Illustrated cover ads appear to violate the guidelines of the American Society of Magazine Editors, the influential trade group that awards the National Magazine Awards. The first rule in its guidelines for magazine editors and publishers is, “Don’t print ads on covers.”
"The cover is the editor and publisher’s brand statement," it says. "Advertisements should not be printed directly on the cover or spine."

That said, print newspapers such as the Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal run ads on their front pages, and ads on the home pages of magazine and news sites are pretty much the norm.
"You can either say this is a groundbreaking decision to put ads on covers after 91 years in the business," Norman Pearlstine, Time Inc’s chief content officer, tells AdAge, ”or you can say this is a relatively modest reference that catches up to what’s going on in the industry.”
We go with the latter with the caveat that it will be disappointing when our best magazine covers are covered in ads.
Image: Vintage Youtube by Moma, a Brazilian advertising agency, as part of a 2010 “Everything Ages Fast” campaign.

Recently, In Advertising

"There are things in there editors won’t like, and things in there that publishers won’t like," a Condé Nast editor tells AdAge about the company’s decision to formalize its native advertising policies.

An approximately 4,000-word internal document is currently circulating the company, AdAge reports, that “not only delves into advertising but also provides standards and practices around certain legal and privacy concerns, including how the company will handle consumer data.”

Condé Nast includes publications such as Wired, Vogue, The New Yorker and Vanity Fair among many others.

Other large publishers, such as Hearst (Cosmo and Esquire) and Time, Inc (Time, People and Sports Illustrated), are sticking to more general guidelines and making case-by-case decisions on native ads and their formats.

Meantime, Time magazine and Sports Illustrated are breaking a magazine industry taboo by selling advertising on the covers of their print editions.

As The New York Times notes:

[T]he Time and Sports Illustrated cover ads appear to violate the guidelines of the American Society of Magazine Editors, the influential trade group that awards the National Magazine Awards. The first rule in its guidelines for magazine editors and publishers is, “Don’t print ads on covers.”

"The cover is the editor and publisher’s brand statement," it says. "Advertisements should not be printed directly on the cover or spine."

That said, print newspapers such as the Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal run ads on their front pages, and ads on the home pages of magazine and news sites are pretty much the norm.

"You can either say this is a groundbreaking decision to put ads on covers after 91 years in the business," Norman Pearlstine, Time Inc’s chief content officer, tells AdAge, ”or you can say this is a relatively modest reference that catches up to what’s going on in the industry.”

We go with the latter with the caveat that it will be disappointing when our best magazine covers are covered in ads.

Image: Vintage Youtube by Moma, a Brazilian advertising agency, as part of a 2010 “Everything Ages Fast” campaign.

Calling All Unicorn + Magazine Lovers
Medium’s flagship publication, Matter, is hiring summer interns. Full details here.

MATTER is looking for two editorial interns to help us spin ideas, words, and images into stories that matter. One intern will work in the New York office; the other, at our San Francisco headquarters. The term is three months: June, July, and August. And we pay $14 an hour (or school credit). You may be asked to prance around the office in a unicorn suit on Formal Fridays.*

FJP: We share this because, unicorns. Also, remember when this happened?

Calling All Unicorn + Magazine Lovers

Medium’s flagship publication, Matter, is hiring summer interns. Full details here.

MATTER is looking for two editorial interns to help us spin ideas, words, and images into stories that matter. One intern will work in the New York office; the other, at our San Francisco headquarters. The term is three months: June, July, and August. And we pay $14 an hour (or school credit). You may be asked to prance around the office in a unicorn suit on Formal Fridays.*

FJP: We share this because, unicorns. Also, remember when this happened?

But why would a person write to Redbook extolling the great beauty and virtue of Eva Longoria? I have my own set of favorite actors… but I can barely imagine composing a sincere tweet about them, let alone writing multiple paragraphs and then sending them to a magazine for publication. That’s even more true in an era in which it’s so easy to do one’s gushing online, using less formal language. What compels an enthusiastic reader to let Entertainment Weekly know that this year’s fall TV preview was the best ever?

Ruth Graham, Meet the People Who Still Write Letters to the Editor, The Awl.

To answer the question, Ruth Graham interviews four writers of recent letters to the editor in People and Vanity Fair. While this is by no means representative of any kind of trend, three out of four of them are over the age of 60 and three out of four are or have been writers of some sort. Read about them here.

FJP: Here’s a personal thought on reading comments in print vs. online. I generally read about 4 magazines in print per month. I don’t subscribe to any, I just pick up what looks interesting at the train station when I’m visiting my folks. I always stop and read the letters section, both the letter from the editor and the letters to the editor. I do this because when reading in print, I feel I need to orient myself and get a grip on the identity of the publication in hand. It feels like a respectful thing to do. I feel compelled to perform this act of respect because holding an entire issue of a magazine in your hands makes you feel the weight of the effort that went into it. Perhaps it makes no sense, but I want to reciprocate.

The content of these letters to the editor are hardly ever more insightful or intriguing that comments people leave online. Yet because they get an entire printed page, I spend a few extra seconds pondering them than I would something online. And particularly because I’m a child of the age of millennial voyeurism, it’s a strange feeling to read letters to the editor in print and not get to internet stalk the people who wrote them. So, this Awl piece is a fun read. And something I’ve always been curious about. —Jihii

Somewhat related: A NY Times Magazine piece from last weekend on the history, future and quality of comments.

MegaNews: A Modern-day Newsstand

via bigthink:

MegaNews Magazines is up and running in Stockholm, hoping to change the modern media landscape. The newsstand kiosk allows for on the spot, high quality, color prints of a wide range of magazines and periodicals (200 at present). 

[…] The machine (which takes up space of less than 4 square meters) allows customers to choose the publication they want to buy via a touchscreen, pay with a credit card, and get a copy, printed on the spot, in two minutes. The newsstand is connected to the internet and can download upon request the latest pdf files from any partner publisher’s server.

According to Stefan Melesko, a lecturer in Media Economics, 10% of the entire cost structure for most publications consists of distribution costs. In addition, publishers produce a surplus of copies, at times being unable to sell up to 30-40% of them and accruing additional expenses for handling the returns. On-demand printing newsstands like Meganews Magazines can save publishers money on printing and distribution. They can also help them reach customers whenever and wherever, while giving them real time feedback on sales.

Images: YouTube, Stills of MegaNews Magazines video

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV
Via Mashable: 

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV

Via Mashable

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

The 2013 Utne Media Awards
About the contest:

2013 marks a new chapter in the 24-year history of the Utne Readerstaff recognizing and celebrating the best of what we read. Formerly called the Utne Independent Press Awards, we’ve decided to contemporize the name and call them the Utne Media Awards.
Considering the wealth of amazing new ideas, exceptional writing, and outstanding journalism taking place on the internet, we think it’s time the name of the award encompass every form of mass communication we come across each day from longform print journalism to video blogs. While we still love and will always celebrate the printed word, we’d be remiss not to recognize the democratization of information made possible by the internet. We think emphasizing the broad term “media” allows us to appropriately consider and recognize all of the ways people communicate with one another in the 21st century.

The winners are: 
YES! Magazine for General Excellence
The New Inquiry for Best Writing
Tom Dispatch for Best Political Coverage
Colossal for Best Arts Coverage
Guernica for Best Social/Cultural Coverage
New Internationalist for Best International Coverage
High Country News for Best Environmental Coverage
Tricycle for Best Body/Spirit Coverage
Scientific American for Best Science/Technology Coverage
See here for descriptions of the winners.
See here for the full list of nominees.
FJP: An interesting mix. Agree/Disagree or have some favorites of your own in any category? Let us know.

The 2013 Utne Media Awards

About the contest:

2013 marks a new chapter in the 24-year history of the Utne Readerstaff recognizing and celebrating the best of what we read. Formerly called the Utne Independent Press Awards, we’ve decided to contemporize the name and call them the Utne Media Awards.

Considering the wealth of amazing new ideas, exceptional writing, and outstanding journalism taking place on the internet, we think it’s time the name of the award encompass every form of mass communication we come across each day from longform print journalism to video blogs. While we still love and will always celebrate the printed word, we’d be remiss not to recognize the democratization of information made possible by the internet. We think emphasizing the broad term “media” allows us to appropriately consider and recognize all of the ways people communicate with one another in the 21st century.

The winners are: 

  • YES! Magazine for General Excellence
  • The New Inquiry for Best Writing
  • Tom Dispatch for Best Political Coverage
  • Colossal for Best Arts Coverage
  • Guernica for Best Social/Cultural Coverage
  • New Internationalist for Best International Coverage
  • High Country News for Best Environmental Coverage
  • Tricycle for Best Body/Spirit Coverage
  • Scientific American for Best Science/Technology Coverage

See here for descriptions of the winners.

See here for the full list of nominees.

FJP: An interesting mix. Agree/Disagree or have some favorites of your own in any category? Let us know.

Swallow Mag Brings Scratch and Sniff to Mexico City Issue

fjp-latinamerica:

Swallow has devoted its third issue to our beloved Mexico City, as reported by The New York Times’s Maria Newman in a short introductory blog post

What is remarkable about this issue, though, apart from the stunning and jaw-dropping photography, is a strange new feature that, in our view, exponentiates the scope of basic written storytelling:

“A scratch-and-sniff feature that brings you the smells of the sprawling metropolis”.

Delicious, or maybe not, depending on your sensibility towards all things chilangoYet, we kind of wonder if this trend-setting feature will eventually embody the future of travel writing/reporting for print publications; a disruptive device hard impossible to find in digital publications.

Here is the rationale behind that editorial decision:

This time, said James Casey, the magazine’s editor, they decided to include the ambitious olfactory project, put together by Sissel Tolaas, a fragrance expert and artist. Mr. Casey had reached out to Ms. Tolaas after he heard of a project she had done that reproduced the smells from 200 Mexico City neighborhoods.

This issue of Swallow includes 20 scratch-and-sniff stickers throughout that are imbued with the aromas of one of the city’s many colonias, or neighborhoods. (Reproducing the smells in the magazine was a complex undertaking for their printers in Singapore, and is partly the reason it took more than a year to publish.) Not all of the odors are pleasant.

FJP: We can only hope that our fellow Chilanga-in-Portland is not the only one left awestruck:

Images: Assorted local snacks, candies, and pastries. Partial screenshots of Swallow Magazine’s piece on Mexico City’s supermarkets.

FJP: Never underestimate the power of scratch and sniff.

A magazine article is like a strip tease. Whereas a newspaper article is like being flashed on the subway.
Jennifer Kahn to Kathryn Roethel, The Future of Freelancing. The Science (Not Art) of the Magazine Pitch.
No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks
A few weeks ago EJ Fox wrote a piece for us exploring longform storytelling and adopting magazine experiences for the Web.
In it, he discusses how JavaScript and CSS techniques can introduce full screen images and video, parallax effects and responsive design to amplify and support storytelling. 
Importantly, he also writes about how producers of these longform pieces must break out from the templates and general style guides that control the rest of their sites.
SBNation’s coverage of the Yukon Quest Race is a great, new example of harnessing these techniques. Created with Vox Media, it’s an elegant display of wrapping a 5,500-word longread in a delightful presentation package.
Check it: SBNation, No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks.

No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks

A few weeks ago EJ Fox wrote a piece for us exploring longform storytelling and adopting magazine experiences for the Web.

In it, he discusses how JavaScript and CSS techniques can introduce full screen images and video, parallax effects and responsive design to amplify and support storytelling. 

Importantly, he also writes about how producers of these longform pieces must break out from the templates and general style guides that control the rest of their sites.

SBNation’s coverage of the Yukon Quest Race is a great, new example of harnessing these techniques. Created with Vox Media, it’s an elegant display of wrapping a 5,500-word longread in a delightful presentation package.

Check it: SBNation, No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks.

If advertising is meant to be aspirational, these ads [in men’s magazines] are presenting a pretty sad version of what American men can aspire to be. And advertisers aren’t selling this hyper-masculine ideal to just any man: They’re specifically targeting the younger, poorer, less-educated guys in the supermarket aisle. In the latest issue of the journal Sex Roles, a trio of psychologists at the University of Manitoba analyzed the advertising images in a slate of magazines targeted at men, from Fortune to Field and Stream. They counted up the ads that depict men as violent, calloused, tough, dangerous, and sexually aggressive—what the researchers call “hyper-masculine”—then indexed them with the magazine’s target demographics. Hyper-masculine images, the researchers found, are more likely to be sold to adolescents, who find higher “peer group support” for manly-man behaviors. They’re also sold to working-class men, who are “embedded in enduring social and economic structures in which they experience powerlessness and lack of access to resources” like political power, social respect, and wealth, and so turn to more widely accessible measures of masculine worth—like “physical strength and aggression.”

90 Years of TIME Magazine Covers in 120 Seconds

via.

Are we witnessing the rise of the artisanal magazine?

thepenguinpress:

Jason Diamond writes in Flavorwire

Observe The Travel Almanac selling out, and Kindling Quarterly, described as an “exploration of fatherhood through essays, interviews, editorials, art, and photography,” getting written up by The New York Times as examples of this crop of sleek new magazines aimed at niche readerships. David Michael Perez, one of Kindling Quarterly’s founders, told the Times that he believes his magazine (which retails at $14 an issue) is a good business model that he and his business partner, August Heffner, jumpstarted using personal funds. There’s the Canadian menswear magazine Inventory, which retails for $20 in the States, and Babes Quarterly is billed as “a modernized version of the classic 1950’s and 60’s pocket men’s magazine” that is “designed to a creative, babe loving guy in all of us.” These magazines are also thinking of new ways to promote their product, and also new ways of doing business overall. The Portland magazine Kinfolk explicitly states on its website that it is a “collectable print magazine” aimed at growing a “readership of young artists and food enthusiasts by focusing on simple ways to spend time together.” The Chicagoan, a Jazz Age Windy City magazine that was relaunched in 2012 by Stop Smiling publisher J.C. Gabel, says it has “embraced the vintage newsstand as a metaphor to bolster our message of substance and style” by setting up pop-up newsstands throughout the Chicagoland area meant to function “much like food trucks.” The Toronto fashion journal Worn comes out biannually, with a stated mission “[t]o show a wide range of beauty, one that includes diversity of culture, subculture, gender identification, sexuality, size, race, ability, and age,” as well as “To answer, always and above all, to our readers and not our advertisers.”

FJP: The pop-up newsstand food truck idea is brilliant. Could serve sandwiches and coffee too.

The Magazine Experience on the Web
Over on theFJP.org, EJ Fox explores how news organizations are taking advantage of responsive design, CSS and JavaScript techniques not just to make things pretty, but to better tell their stories.
For example, he takes a look at the New York Times’ recent and well regarded Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek. As he explores its presentation, he writes:
Its graphics and videos stretch to fill the entire browser window, an emerging design trend that is the true successor of the magazine’s full-bleed photos. The Times shows that when you elevate beautiful art that’s telling the story in a seamless way, it becomes greater than the sum of it’s parts. Compare to a similar NYT story where pictures are included with the story, but certainly not featured with any love.
It’s not confined to the style of the rest of the NYT site, which is for the most part a static 975px width. Some of the impact of full-bleed pieces like Snow Fall comes from the contrast between those special features and the whitespace of the primary site. It’s a clue to the user to dig in, and that something special is going to happen.
Read through for the rest, including how Web presentation and storytelling design affected EJ’s reporting on Occupy Oakland.
You can follow EJ on Tumblr at Pseudo Placebo. On Twitter he’s @mrejfox.
Image: Screenshot, Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, via the New York Times. Select to embiggen.

The Magazine Experience on the Web

Over on theFJP.org, EJ Fox explores how news organizations are taking advantage of responsive design, CSS and JavaScript techniques not just to make things pretty, but to better tell their stories.

For example, he takes a look at the New York Times’ recent and well regarded Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek. As he explores its presentation, he writes:

  • Its graphics and videos stretch to fill the entire browser window, an emerging design trend that is the true successor of the magazine’s full-bleed photos. The Times shows that when you elevate beautiful art that’s telling the story in a seamless way, it becomes greater than the sum of it’s parts. Compare to a similar NYT story where pictures are included with the story, but certainly not featured with any love.
  • It’s not confined to the style of the rest of the NYT site, which is for the most part a static 975px width. Some of the impact of full-bleed pieces like Snow Fall comes from the contrast between those special features and the whitespace of the primary site. It’s a clue to the user to dig in, and that something special is going to happen.

Read through for the rest, including how Web presentation and storytelling design affected EJ’s reporting on Occupy Oakland.

You can follow EJ on Tumblr at Pseudo Placebo. On Twitter he’s @mrejfox.

Image: Screenshot, Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, via the New York Times. Select to embiggen.