Posts tagged magazines

Athletes Recreating Iconic Album Covers

As ESPN The Magazine’s music issue hits the stands they’ve recreated old album covers with current day athletes.

Here we have:

Click through for slideshows of each photo shoot. Select to embiggen.

How to Relaunch a 98 Year Old Magazine: Think of it as a Start-Up

“It felt like for the past 10 years, the magazine was just trying to stay afloat,” he said. “There were real limits on our ambitions.”

Sitting in the K Street offices that The New Republic is renting until it relocates to a space above the International Spy Museum, Mr. Foer said that Mr. Hughes had energized the magazine. “He really thinks of it as a start-up, and that’s exhilarating,” he said. On Monday, readers will be able to see the fruits of Mr. Hughes’s investment for the first time when The New Republic unveils its redesigned print magazine, Web site and app.

Read on

How to Staff for Social Media

Mark Golin, Editorial Director of Digital for Time Inc.’s Style & Entertainment and Lifestyle Groups, discusses the social phenomenon of people relying on networks such as Twitter and Facebook as their primary news source.

In order to harness these platforms successfully, Golin explains how magazines must carefully staff social media positions with people who have a particular skill set that is not unlike what we look for in editors. In order to engage users successfully, Golin believes that a unique voice is needed on each platform, and the style and sensibility required of social media editors is something that can — in most cases — be learned and practiced.

Visit the theFJP.org to see more videos with Mark.

#BuhBye

#BuhBye

Understanding People: A Publication’s Content Strategy

New on theFJP.org:

Mark Golin, Editorial Director of Digital for Time Inc.’s Style & Entertainment and Lifestyle Groups, talks about People Magazine’s online content strategy.

Much of People’s digital success is due to a digital strategy that creates specific content for each of its platforms based on the expected user experience and engagement of readers on them.

For example, Golin explains, People Magazine promotes a lean-back experience that allows for longer, human interest stories. Meanwhile, visitors to People.com are often at work and multitasking, so shorter, more celebrity-focused content works better.

People’s success, then, comes from optimizing a content strategy for each platform — longer, slower content in the magazine, and shorter, eye-catching headlines online. The division of content offered on each platform therefore needs to be considerate of how readers will be consuming it.

It has long been said that digital platforms work best when content is created specifically for them, rather than simply repurposed from one medium to another. In other words, content should be, feel and act “native” to the platform it’s being delivered through. The People strategy Mark discusses is based on understanding user engagement.

For more thoughts from Mark Golin see here.
To explore more FJP videos on technology, journalism, education, and business visit theFJP.org.

A Chronology of Magazines Transitioning from Print to Digital

Latest on theFJP.org:

Mark Golin, Editorial Director of Digital for Time Inc.’s Style & Entertainment and Lifestyle Groups, walks us through the developmental stages of magazines’ journey from print to digital. Likening the story to that of a growing person, Golin explains how–and why–magazine editors and publishers were so reluctant to post their precious print content on the internet.

This, he says, was the infancy of digital magazines. Moving into childhood meant being more open to posting more and more content online, which did happen, though that content was often selected from the editorial dustbin. Today, we’re living through the growing pains digital magazine adolescence.

Print and digital experiences work well together but there are a few more life lessons left to learn before we’re legal.

See more FJP interviews here.

kateoplis:

ckck:

New York Magazine cover photo by Iwan Baan. Wow.

More Iwan Baan.

FJP: Well done.

kateoplis:

ckck:

New York Magazine cover photo by Iwan Baan. Wow.

More Iwan Baan.

FJP: Well done.

Preventing errors from appearing in the magazine is not a simple process. For openers, you need to know that in addition to the basic reporting pieces, we also check “The Talk of the Town,” the critics, fiction, poetry, cartoons, art, captions, the table of contents, certain of the several-paragraph-long essays in the “Goings On” section. We also fact-check the contributors page, the cover wrap, the letters column, all the press releases, and a good deal of the recently mounted Web site.

To start checking a nonfiction piece, you begin by consulting the writer about how the piece was put together and using the writer’s sources as well as our own departmental sources. We then essentially take the piece apart and put it back together again. You make sure that the names and dates are right, but then if it is a John McPhee piece, you make sure that the USGS report that he read, he read correctly; or if it is a John le Carré piece, when he says his con man father ran for Parliament in 1950, you make sure that it wasn’t 1949 or 1951.

Or if we describe the basis on which the FDA approved or disapproved the medical tests that ImClone used for Erbitux, then you need to find out what the complexities of that whole situation were. And of course, this kind of thing has consequences, because if you get it wrong, it matters. We also work on complicated pieces such as the ones we’ve been running this fall about the Pentagon’s top-secret team that is trained to snatch nukes away from belligerent countries, or the piece about the Predator drone that had a clear shot at Mullah Omar, for better or for worse, and didn’t take the shot because the CENTCOM attorneys were not clear on the legality of that operation.

Back in 2002, New Yorker fact-checking director Peter Canby gave a lecture at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism about… fact-checking The New Yorker. The lecture is now a chapter in The Art of Making Magazines: On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry, an anthology released this September from this and similar Columbia lectures given over the years.

Peter Canby, Columbia Journalism Review. Fact-checking at The New Yorker.

News Kids Can Use?
Publishers of a popular Tunisian children’s magazine called Qaws Quzah (“Rainbow”) will be prosecuted for including instructions on how to make a Molotov Cocktail in a recent issue.
The Ministry for Women and Family Affairs said the article “encouraged violent and terrorist thoughts.”
Via the BBC: 

The publication carried a picture of a burning glass bottle to illustrate the history and uses of petrol bombs.
The piece appeared in the magazine’s so-called Knowledge Corner.
"It is an improvised weapon that is often used in riots and acts of sabotage because it is easy to make and use," the article explained.
The ministry for family affairs said the magazine was endangering children’s lives by encouraging the use petrol bombs “in acts of vandalism or terrorism”.

Image: The “Knowledge Corner” of Qaws Quzah with an article about the history and making of Molotov Cocktails, via the Daily Mail.

News Kids Can Use?

Publishers of a popular Tunisian children’s magazine called Qaws Quzah (“Rainbow”) will be prosecuted for including instructions on how to make a Molotov Cocktail in a recent issue.

The Ministry for Women and Family Affairs said the article “encouraged violent and terrorist thoughts.”

Via the BBC

The publication carried a picture of a burning glass bottle to illustrate the history and uses of petrol bombs.

The piece appeared in the magazine’s so-called Knowledge Corner.

"It is an improvised weapon that is often used in riots and acts of sabotage because it is easy to make and use," the article explained.

The ministry for family affairs said the magazine was endangering children’s lives by encouraging the use petrol bombs “in acts of vandalism or terrorism”.

Image: The “Knowledge Corner” of Qaws Quzah with an article about the history and making of Molotov Cocktails, via the Daily Mail.

Meme 1, Newsweek 0
Tina Brown’s latest Newsweek cover does what a Tina Brown cover does best: combine provocative imagery with an inflammatory title that gets people talking about the magazine.
In this case, “MUSLIM RAGE” screams the headline with two intense men wailing in protest underneath.
The cover itself is meta, playing on the “Why do they hate us?” meme that runs through the American press. Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, captures the absurdity of the premise:

One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage…
…On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute report on Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:

"It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now."

That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right to protest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator.

So, Newsweek is playing the ahistorical questions running through traditional media channels and while doing so, asks readers to chime in on Twitter with their thoughts using the #MuslimRage hashtag.
And that’s when, the Internet being the Internet, things got fun and users wrestled back the narrative:
"Lost your kid Jihad at the airport. Can’t yell for him. #MuslimRage" — @LSal92.
"I’m having such a good hair day. No one even knows. #MuslimRage" — @LibertyLibya.
"So you’re telling me that in this entire sporting goods store you don’t have a single ski turban? #muslimrage" — @TomGara.
"Ramadan in Iceland when days are 23 hours long. #muslimrage" — @iron_emu.
Coincidently, Michael Wolff recently wrote about Tina Brown and the challenges she faces with Newsweek from his new column at USA Today:

The most famous magazine editor of her generation is engaged in a desperate and operatic struggle, which almost no one anywhere believes has any chance of success, to reinvent Newsweek as a sustainable business proposition. In this, she is arguably no different from anybody else with a venerable media brand, except that Newsweek is in more dire extremis and her notoriety personalizes the fight…
…The issue was starkly simple: Could a traditional brand be reinvented in what is called a “digital first” context — and soon migrate entirely to digital — and, even more challenging, could it be reinvented by a traditional editor?

This week’s answer to that question is a clumsy MUSLIM RAGE cover with two stand-ins representing a billion-plus people. It’s analog link bait, a purposeful troll.
Yet, in a digital world where people can talk back and wrestle premises away from brands and organizations, the audience is mocking it. — Michael.
Image: Muslim Rave, via @max_read.

Meme 1, Newsweek 0

Tina Brown’s latest Newsweek cover does what a Tina Brown cover does best: combine provocative imagery with an inflammatory title that gets people talking about the magazine.

In this case, “MUSLIM RAGE” screams the headline with two intense men wailing in protest underneath.

The cover itself is meta, playing on the “Why do they hate us?” meme that runs through the American press. Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, captures the absurdity of the premise:

One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage…

…On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute report on Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:

"It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now."

That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right to protest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator.

So, Newsweek is playing the ahistorical questions running through traditional media channels and while doing so, asks readers to chime in on Twitter with their thoughts using the #MuslimRage hashtag.

And that’s when, the Internet being the Internet, things got fun and users wrestled back the narrative:

  • "Lost your kid Jihad at the airport. Can’t yell for him. #MuslimRage" — @LSal92.
  • "I’m having such a good hair day. No one even knows. #MuslimRage" — @LibertyLibya.
  • "So you’re telling me that in this entire sporting goods store you don’t have a single ski turban? #muslimrage" — @TomGara.
  • "Ramadan in Iceland when days are 23 hours long. #muslimrage" — @iron_emu.

Coincidently, Michael Wolff recently wrote about Tina Brown and the challenges she faces with Newsweek from his new column at USA Today:

The most famous magazine editor of her generation is engaged in a desperate and operatic struggle, which almost no one anywhere believes has any chance of success, to reinvent Newsweek as a sustainable business proposition. In this, she is arguably no different from anybody else with a venerable media brand, except that Newsweek is in more dire extremis and her notoriety personalizes the fight…

…The issue was starkly simple: Could a traditional brand be reinvented in what is called a “digital first” context — and soon migrate entirely to digital — and, even more challenging, could it be reinvented by a traditional editor?

This week’s answer to that question is a clumsy MUSLIM RAGE cover with two stand-ins representing a billion-plus people. It’s analog link bait, a purposeful troll.

Yet, in a digital world where people can talk back and wrestle premises away from brands and organizations, the audience is mocking it. — Michael.

Image: Muslim Rave, via @max_read.

Diary of a Mad Fact-Checker

sasquatchmedia:

I work on and off as a fact-checker at the most accurate magazine in America. I think so, at least. The checker assigned to this piece may come up with a list of competitors for that title—and in that case I’ll say that, having either been fact-checked by or been a fact-checker at most of them, she can count this fact as my own original reporting. My editor will probably agree and, if she pushes it, tell her that anyway “most accurate” is a qualitative evaluation, like “best defensive shortstop,” or “hottest freshman.” He won’t say, though it’ll be implicit, that the whole idea of The Oxford American assigning an essay about fact-checking works better if the guy they got to write it works as part of the best research department in the country—which makes me seem like an authority—and that it’d be a shame to lose the superlative when the magazine in question isn’t even going to be named. Superlatives, if you pay attention, are how magazines make stories seem worth reading, and not even the checkers at the most accurate magazine in America can fight off all the spurious ones.

Bringing this to my news reporting class Tuesday. 

FJP: Genius. Read On.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko
FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?
UPDATE, via Eater:
But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

OK, Barry Diller, You Can Kill the Print Newsweek Now — Jim Romenesko

FJP: When potentially good covers go bad?

UPDATE, via Eater:

But oops: The UK’s Observer Food Monthly already used the same stock photo on its cover back in April 2008. This same photograph has also appeared in a May 2012 issue of Harper’s Bazaar in Russia. It’s sort a boring re-occurring stock photo, as found here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.
guernicamag:

Sean Stewart: The visuals were indispensable. They were the first point of entry for many people, and, in contrast to the linear, text-heavy layout of the straight press, the focus on graphics and rejection of standard principles of layout in the underground acted as an instant, and very potent, signifier of the differences between the two. A lot of what is standard practice visually in magazines and newspapers today was pioneered by the kids working on these underground newspapers in the Sixties. Shit, I even remember the uproar caused by the New York Times’ decision to finally include color photos back in the 1990s. (via Notes from the Underground, Matthew Newton interviews Sean Stewart - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics)
Writer and former radical bookstore owner Sean Stewart talks about his new book on the underground press that was so vital to ’60s counterculture.
READ MORE

FJP: Adding this to our reading list.

guernicamag:

Sean Stewart: The visuals were indispensable. They were the first point of entry for many people, and, in contrast to the linear, text-heavy layout of the straight press, the focus on graphics and rejection of standard principles of layout in the underground acted as an instant, and very potent, signifier of the differences between the two. A lot of what is standard practice visually in magazines and newspapers today was pioneered by the kids working on these underground newspapers in the Sixties. Shit, I even remember the uproar caused by the New York Times’ decision to finally include color photos back in the 1990s. (via Notes from the Underground, Matthew Newton interviews Sean Stewart - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics)

Writer and former radical bookstore owner Sean Stewart talks about his new book on the underground press that was so vital to ’60s counterculture.

READ MORE

FJP: Adding this to our reading list.

Hi, I really need your help. I've got a job interview on Friday and they want me to come up with some ideas on how to increase the magazine's hard copy readership. It's been going for 25 years and has an established, loyal base but the time has come to increase that to the new generation without radically changing its content. Do you have any ideas on how to go about this? Thanks. — Asked by Anonymous

We don’t envy you because if we had a surefire one size fits all solution we’d be rolling in the big bucks. Instead, we run a Tumblr.

That said, it’s hard to offer advice without knowing anything about the magazine you’re going to interview for. Is it a general interest, fashion, music or sports title? Perhaps it’s super niche?

And that said, take a look at our Magazines Tag. Most of the posts are about magazines and their efforts to go digital but there are some that talk about print magazines making it in print.

For starters, try these:

Our Business Models Tag will be helpful too. It focuses on much more than magazines but should give you good ideas about what people are thinking about when it comes to sustainability and overall audience growth.

Hope this helps and good luck with the interview. — Michael