Posts tagged with ‘manga’

Manga Makes Us Smarter
MSNBC’s comics blog has a story about San Francisco-based No Starch Press and its release of a line of math and science manga comic books.
The books are translations of Japanese originals.
Via MSNBC:

The plot lines may sound sappy to grown-ups. Usually they involve a cute schoolgirl or schoolboy who’s challenged by an equally cute teacher to master a seemingly impenetrable subject. But Bill Pollock, the founder and president of No Starch Press, says the books get the job done, especially for students who are at a crucial age for math and science education…
…Japanese researchers have reported that manga books can deliver information in a shorter time and make a stronger impression than conventional textbooks. “Manga’s textual hybridity is utilized to promote the readers’ effective learning, as verbal and iconographic tests place multiple layers of information in context and project a focused content,” Satsuki Murakami and Mio Bryce wrote in the International Journal of the Humanities.

Image: The Manga Guide to Relativity via No Starch Press.

Manga Makes Us Smarter

MSNBC’s comics blog has a story about San Francisco-based No Starch Press and its release of a line of math and science manga comic books.

The books are translations of Japanese originals.

Via MSNBC:

The plot lines may sound sappy to grown-ups. Usually they involve a cute schoolgirl or schoolboy who’s challenged by an equally cute teacher to master a seemingly impenetrable subject. But Bill Pollock, the founder and president of No Starch Press, says the books get the job done, especially for students who are at a crucial age for math and science education…

…Japanese researchers have reported that manga books can deliver information in a shorter time and make a stronger impression than conventional textbooks. “Manga’s textual hybridity is utilized to promote the readers’ effective learning, as verbal and iconographic tests place multiple layers of information in context and project a focused content,” Satsuki Murakami and Mio Bryce wrote in the International Journal of the Humanities.

Image: The Manga Guide to Relativity via No Starch Press.

In this week’s Studio 360, Kurt Anderson explores Japanese popular culture and its take on disaster, from historical Godzilla films to contemporary artists drawing popular Manga characters pitching in to help with tsunami relieft.
Via Studio 360:

There’s a reason why Japanese horror movies come to mind in the middle of this catastrophe. Disasters — natural and man-made — have marked Japan for centuries.  And they’ve become powerful (and popular) archetypes in Japanese culture: from the most famous image in Japanese art, Hokusai’s Great Wave, to the post-apocalyptic anime film Akira. Japanese pop culture has been deeply affected by what Susan Sontag called “the imagination of disaster”

The segment can be listened to (and downloaded) here.
Somewhat related: the New York Times Op Art page has illustrations by three Japanese artists that reflect on the tsunami and its aftermath. 

In this week’s Studio 360, Kurt Anderson explores Japanese popular culture and its take on disaster, from historical Godzilla films to contemporary artists drawing popular Manga characters pitching in to help with tsunami relieft.

Via Studio 360:

There’s a reason why Japanese horror movies come to mind in the middle of this catastrophe. Disasters — natural and man-made — have marked Japan for centuries.  And they’ve become powerful (and popular) archetypes in Japanese culture: from the most famous image in Japanese art, Hokusai’s Great Wave, to the post-apocalyptic anime film Akira. Japanese pop culture has been deeply affected by what Susan Sontag called “the imagination of disaster”

The segment can be listened to (and downloaded) here.

Somewhat related: the New York Times Op Art page has illustrations by three Japanese artists that reflect on the tsunami and its aftermath.