Posts tagged marketing

How to Morph Forrest Gump into Daft Punk

When ad agency Grey London and design studio Us (Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor) came together, they created this stunning ad for The Sunday Times. In total, there are six iconic scenes from art, music, and film, fit into one single steadicam shot.  

From the creators:

This is all about those iconic cultural images that we pin to our walls and stick in our minds. We all have our favourites. Heisenberg, Kraftwerk, and Banksy’s kissing coppers all featured in early scripts, but we wanted to take a snapshot of what’s making the headlines in 2014. Daft Punk winning big at the Grammy’s, The final series of Mad Men, and Tarantino are all over the media right now. These people and their work have left an indelible mark and we’ll probably still be talking about them in ten, twenty maybe even a hundred years years time. The TV spot is a respectful nod to it all.

If you’ve ever seen a steadicam in action, you know how difficult getting everything perfect in one take truly is. If not, see the making of Icons here

What Surveillance Valley knows about you

Via PandoDaily:

No source of information is sacred: transaction records are bought in bulk from stores, retailers and merchants; magazine subscriptions are recorded; food and restaurant preferences are noted; public records and social networks are scoured and scraped. What kind of prescription drugs did you buy? What kind of books are you interested in? Are you a registered voter? To what non-profits do you donate? What movies do you watch? Political documentaries? Hunting reality TV shows?

That info is combined and kept up to date with address, payroll information, phone numbers, email accounts, social security numbers, vehicle registration and financial history. And all that is sliced, isolated, analyzed and mined for data about you and your habits in a million different ways…

…Take MEDbase200, a boutique for-profit intel outfit that specializes in selling health-related consumer data. Well, until last week, the company offered its clients a list of rape victims (or “rape sufferers,” as the company calls them) at the low price of $79.00 per thousand. The company claims to have segmented this data set into hundreds of different categories, including stuff like the ailments they suffer, prescription drugs they take and their ethnicity…

…[I]f lists of rape victims aren’t your thing, MEDbase can sell dossiers on people suffering from anorexia, substance abuse, AIDS and HIV, Alzheimer’s Disease, Asperger Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Bedwetting (Enuresis), Binge Eating Disorder, Depression, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Homelessness, Infertility, Syphilis… the list goes on and on and on and on.

PandoDaily reports that some 4,000 data mining companies generate about $200 billion annually. 

No Girls Allowed

Journalist Tracy Lien dissects the “video games are for boys” stereotype.

Google’s One Stop Shop for Journalists
via Journalism.co.uk:

Google has launched a site dedicated to highlighting the portfolio of its tools which can be of particular use to journalists, outlining the functionality of each.Effectively, the Google Media Tools site acts as a one-stop-shop which journalists can visit to not only get an understanding the technology on offer from Google, but also how it can be used to support or power their work, with links to industry examples for inspiration.According to its own description, the site aims to act as a “starting point to tap into Google’s suite of digital tools that can enhance newsgathering and exposure across television, radio, print and online”."Whether it’s refining your advanced search capabilities, improving audience engagement through Google+, or learning how to visualise data using Google Maps, this website is intended to guide you through all the resources Google offers to journalists".

Image: Screenshot from the Google Media Tools page.

Google’s One Stop Shop for Journalists

via Journalism.co.uk:

Google has launched a site dedicated to highlighting the portfolio of its tools which can be of particular use to journalists, outlining the functionality of each.

Effectively, the Google Media Tools site acts as a one-stop-shop which journalists can visit to not only get an understanding the technology on offer from Google, but also how it can be used to support or power their work, with links to industry examples for inspiration.

According to its own description, the site aims to act as a “starting point to tap into Google’s suite of digital tools that can enhance newsgathering and exposure across television, radio, print and online”.

"Whether it’s refining your advanced search capabilities, improving audience engagement through Google+, or learning how to visualise data using Google Maps, this website is intended to guide you through all the resources Google offers to journalists".

Image: Screenshot from the Google Media Tools page.

The Newest Hottest Spike Lee Joint

The famous Spike Lee has enlisted the world to fund his next film via Kickstarter for a cool $1.25 million. Lee then calls himself an independent filmmaker and almost gets down on his knees to beg you for your money (although Celebrity Net Worth calculates his net worth at $40 million). He provides his body of work as proof that the film will prosper, and promises lots of sex on screen.

As Film School Rejects puts it:

For Spike Lee fans, this is a dream come true. […] For non-Lee fans, well, this is just one more way not to spend your money.

FJP: We’re not sure if the public at large is being taken advantage by the latest trend of celebrity crowd-funding, but the Kickstarter ends August 21 if you want to donate. You’ll still have to pay to see the movie when it’s done though.—Gabbi

Video: Kickstarter (Runtime- 3:14)

Metallica Performs at Comic-Con to Promote New Docu-Drama Film
Comic-con is traditionally not the venue for a heavy metal/rock band to promote a docu-drama film (Metallica Through the Never), let alone perform an exclusive concert. Picturehouse, a waning distributor, was enlisted for the campaign due to the head of the company’s enthusiasm and understanding of the film’s story as well as the band’s intent. They decided to promote at Comic-Con this year, a leap of faith.
FJP: Everything about this marketing campaign for Through the Never is absolutely weird (but maybe it makes sense, since it’s the first of it’s kind to combine a serious plot with documentary concert footage all in 3D)—but we kind of like it.
Image: The Daily Herald

Metallica Performs at Comic-Con to Promote New Docu-Drama Film

Comic-con is traditionally not the venue for a heavy metal/rock band to promote a docu-drama film (Metallica Through the Never), let alone perform an exclusive concert. Picturehouse, a waning distributor, was enlisted for the campaign due to the head of the company’s enthusiasm and understanding of the film’s story as well as the band’s intent. They decided to promote at Comic-Con this year, a leap of faith.

FJP: Everything about this marketing campaign for Through the Never is absolutely weird (but maybe it makes sense, since it’s the first of it’s kind to combine a serious plot with documentary concert footage all in 3D)—but we kind of like it.

Image: The Daily Herald

Giant Dragon Skull on Charmouth Beach, Dorset, UK

As if “Game of Thrones” wasn’t at the top of their game already, the geniuses as blinkbox just installed this massive dragon skull replica in the UK to promote the third season becoming available on their website. According the blinkbox, the project took 2 months to complete, and measures 40 feet long and stands over 9 feet high. 

Images: Top- Imgur, Bottom- blinkbox

Popularity Comes When “B.O.” Goes

You learn a lot about a culture from its advertising. Take, for instance, this 1934 ad for Lifebuoy, a soap that “guards daintiness” as it protects women against unseemly odors.

Equally cringeworthy, it appears alongside “Hepburn Needed Those Spankings,” an article about Katharine Hepburn in Movie Classic, a studio-produced fan magazine.

Banksy on Advertising
Via Upworthy. Select to embiggen.

Banksy on Advertising

Via Upworthy. Select to embiggen.

Selling Data, Taking Things in Your Hands Edition
A common truism says that if it’s free and on the Web, you’re not the customer but the product being sold. Also common is the following reaction: what can I do about that. The less common reaction: How can I get in on that?
Try this one on as a thought experiment.
Via Slate:

In a world of privacy-invading smartphone apps and government-grade spyware, keeping personal data personal online can seem like a difficult task. But could you make money by choosing to give away logs of your most intimate data?
Federico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all.With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2. He says he “violated his own privacy” starting back in February for about 50 days straight, recording screenshots and webcam snaps of himself every 30 seconds and tracking his every footstep using GPS technology. He logged the address of each Web page he visited—storing some 3 million lines of text—and accumulated a massive trove of 21,124 webcam photos and 19,920 screen shots.
Zannier’s aim, somewhat paradoxically, is to take ownership of his own data by selling it. He points out that we often hand over our private data unwittingly, given that few people take the time to read the terms and conditions of apps and online services. Companies rake in millions of dollars selling our information to marketing firms while we receive little in return. But Zannier’s Kickstarter is not just out to make a statement about online privacy—he plans to use the funds to create a browser extension and a smartphone app that he says will help others sell their own data. “If more people do the same, I’m thinking marketers could just pay us directly for our data,” he writes on his Kickstarter page. “It might sound crazy, but so is giving all our data away for free.”

So, just as the Web often disrupts, let’s cut out the middle man.
Image: It’s Free, But They Sell Your Information, via Telco 2.0.

Selling Data, Taking Things in Your Hands Edition

A common truism says that if it’s free and on the Web, you’re not the customer but the product being sold. Also common is the following reaction: what can I do about that. The less common reaction: How can I get in on that?

Try this one on as a thought experiment.

Via Slate:

In a world of privacy-invading smartphone apps and government-grade spyware, keeping personal data personal online can seem like a difficult task. But could you make money by choosing to give away logs of your most intimate data?

Federico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all.With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2. He says he “violated his own privacy” starting back in February for about 50 days straight, recording screenshots and webcam snaps of himself every 30 seconds and tracking his every footstep using GPS technology. He logged the address of each Web page he visited—storing some 3 million lines of text—and accumulated a massive trove of 21,124 webcam photos and 19,920 screen shots.

Zannier’s aim, somewhat paradoxically, is to take ownership of his own data by selling it. He points out that we often hand over our private data unwittingly, given that few people take the time to read the terms and conditions of apps and online services. Companies rake in millions of dollars selling our information to marketing firms while we receive little in return. But Zannier’s Kickstarter is not just out to make a statement about online privacy—he plans to use the funds to create a browser extension and a smartphone app that he says will help others sell their own data. “If more people do the same, I’m thinking marketers could just pay us directly for our data,” he writes on his Kickstarter page. “It might sound crazy, but so is giving all our data away for free.”

So, just as the Web often disrupts, let’s cut out the middle man.

Image: It’s Free, But They Sell Your Information, via Telco 2.0.

Likes Don’t Save Lives

UNICEF Sweden has a new ad campaign reminding people that while social media Likes are nice, what they really need is money to fund their vaccination campaigns.

As The Verge points out, “Facebook likes aren’t treated as currency in other commercial venues, so they shouldn’t be equated with charitable donations.”

And via The Atlantic:

In the beginning, organizations wanted you to like the heck out of their Facebook pages. Why? You know, community-building, awareness-raising, general “engagement”-upping…

…But one thing clicking “like” doesn’t do is, say, get malaria nets to African villages or boost funding for charity groups. And now that Facebook is nearly 9 years old and Twitter is 7, we’re seeing the inevitable backlash against social-media “slacktivism.”

Back to The Verge:

The campaign, created by ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors, takes a rather bold stance against the awareness campaigns that often spread across Facebook and other social media platforms. UNICEF officials acknowledge that such efforts can help introduce issues to a wider audience, though they fear that for most users, the action stops with the click of a button. To further stress this point, UNICEF Sweden released a bold poster alongside the video clips, saying that every like it receives on Facebook will result in exactly zero vaccinations.

That’s not to say “slacktivists” are a bad thing. Liking, sharing and reblogging do serve their purpose in bringing issues to a wider audience. But then what?

Last year, The Atlantic notes, Zeynep Tufekci, a sociology professor and a fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, had this to say:

What is called commonly called slacktivism is not at all about “slacking activists;” rather it is about non-activists taking symbolic action—often in spheres traditionally engaged only by activists or professionals (governments, NGOs, international institutions.). Since these so-called “slacktivists” were never activists to begin with, they are not in dereliction of their activist duties. On the contrary, they are acting, symbolically and in a small way, in a sphere that has traditionally been closed off to “the masses” in any meaningful fashion.

The goal then for those working in social media is to simultaneously help the “slacktivist” set help you by building out ambient awareness of an issue through the messaging you create, while also giving activists and more consistently loyal proponents direct calls to action be it donations, volunteerism, network building, etc.

Meantime, if you’re moved to Like a cause, consider volunteering your time and/or other resources to it as well.

The other two commercials in UNICEF’s campaign can be viewed at The Verge. — Michael

World Press Freedom Day, Redux

Additional imagery from Reporters Without Borders to go along with our earlier post.

Select to embiggen.

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them
Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.
Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers…
…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.
Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).

Blogs Rule, But Brands are Ignoring Them

Technorati’s Media’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report is an important read for brand and marketing folk. In it, the authors write that consumers trust blogs more than social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

The disconnect here is that brand marketers spend more time and resources on social networks, and vastly more dollars on display advertising, search and video.

Via Technorati (PDF):

Currently, the bulk of brands’ overall digital spend goes to display advertising, search and video, with spending on social, including influencer outreach, making up only 10 percent of their total digital spend. Within their social budget, more than half goes to Facebook, followed by YouTube and Twitter, with the remaining 11 percent of their social spend going to blogs and influencers

…In short, where brands are spending is not fully aligned with how and where consumers are seeing value and being influenced. This has much to do with an essential hurdle faced by most content creators: a lack of metrics and the fragmentation that leads to their complexity as a purchasable medium.

The report’s authors argue that brands need to refocus their earned media strategies on direct engagement with influencers.

Image: Detail of digital and social budgets from Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influencer Report (PDF).

Every Fucking Web Site
The morning PSA.
Designers, communicators, marketers and brand strategists: take note.
Personal favorite under header number three: “Because we saw three buckets of shit content on our competitor’s front page and we’re god damned if we’re only gonna have two.” — Michael
H/T: @lorakolodny 

Every Fucking Web Site

The morning PSA.

Designers, communicators, marketers and brand strategists: take note.

Personal favorite under header number three: “Because we saw three buckets of shit content on our competitor’s front page and we’re god damned if we’re only gonna have two.” — Michael

H/T: @lorakolodny