Posts tagged mashups

Mozilla Releases Popcorn Maker

Via Journalism.co.uk:

Mozilla has released Popcorn Maker 1.0, which allows journalists to create web-native video that includes real-time tweets, Google maps, images and more.

Popcorn Maker allows users to drag and drop video from YouTube or Vimeo or audio from SoundCloud and then add other other elements such as images, tweets and links to content on the web. For example, tweets that include a hashtag can be added and will be automatically updated with new tweets containing that hashtag after the video is published.

For those with coding skills, there is a Javascript library called Popcorn.js, which was launched at last year’s MozFest.

After watching the videos and poking around a bit, Popcorn Maker feels like Storify but with a video wrapper.

Visit the site to how it’s been used. For example, this story on New York’s Stop and Frisk laws; this neighborhood tour that mashes up Google Maps and Wikipedia; or this remix of a TED Talk. 

Watcha Gonna Do?

The Gregory Brothers songify Tuesday’s presidential debate.

Taking Wikipedia’s Pulse, Musically

What do changes to Wikipedia sound like? Well, if you track all edits — which are currently pushing about 400 per minute — and mapped them to Open Sound Control, Pure Data and wikibeat, you come out with some modernist beats.

Watch the above screencast by wikibeat creator Dan Chudnov as he does just this. The audio kicks in about a minute into the video.

As Chudnov describes it, “wikibeat sonifies changes to wikipedia as they happen. it uses Ed Summers’ wikipulse, which monitors changes to each language-specific wikipedia and displays their rates of change as gauges, and creates a series of audible beats based on these change rates. it does this by sending the change rate information to a Pure Data application over OSC.”

Read through for links to source code to try it on your own.

H/T: Dario Taraborelli, Senior Research Analyst at the Wikimedia Foundation who we interviewed in January (podcast).

It’s been a long day so I sign off with a say what?

Michele Bachmann gets the Bad Lip Reading (another Tumblr) treatment.

The Internets always amuse. — Michael

H/T: BoingBoing.

Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History
Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.
The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.
For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.
Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History

Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.

The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.

For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.

Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

The Syrian Uprising 2011 Information Center put together this Google Map that shows videos from where activists posted videos of Monday’s protests.
The map and videos can be viewed via Al Jazeera.

The Syrian Uprising 2011 Information Center put together this Google Map that shows videos from where activists posted videos of Monday’s protests.

The map and videos can be viewed via Al Jazeera.

Partners in Crime
The real estate search engine Trulia teamed up with CrimeReports.com, EveryBlock.com and SpotCrime.com to create a crime map of major metropolitan areas in the United States.
Currently in beta, the heat maps show the type and frequency of crimes by neighborhood, with data sets for cities such as Los Angeles, Tampa, Dallas and Philadelphia among others currently in the system.
Above, a detail from Chicago.
Play with it yourself.

Partners in Crime

The real estate search engine Trulia teamed up with CrimeReports.com, EveryBlock.com and SpotCrime.com to create a crime map of major metropolitan areas in the United States.

Currently in beta, the heat maps show the type and frequency of crimes by neighborhood, with data sets for cities such as Los Angeles, Tampa, Dallas and Philadelphia among others currently in the system.

Above, a detail from Chicago.

Play with it yourself.