Posts tagged with ‘measurement’

14 tools to help you measure your social media metrics

Before you start marketing on social sites, choose the tools you need that will help you reach your marketing goals and save you both time and money. Below are 14 tools you may use to help you more effectively build a social media platform.

To see all the tools (some are free, others are paid) please visit 1st Web Designer

14 tools to help you measure your social media metrics

Before you start marketing on social sites, choose the tools you need that will help you reach your marketing goals and save you both time and money. Below are 14 tools you may use to help you more effectively build a social media platform.

To see all the tools (some are free, others are paid) please visit 1st Web Designer

This is a snippet of our interview with Lee Rainie, the Director of Pew’s Internet & American Life Project, at the ARF audience measurement conference.

The second half of our interview focused on the changing nature of how people consume news. Pew ran a research project that asked questions like, ‘how have people changed their news diet?’ In this research, they found that regardless of where a person found a piece of news, they are supplementing their news diet with online research to do a deeper dive on topics they are really interested in.

Some other interesting topics Lee Rainie covered include:
- The fact that the average age of Facebook users is increasing and what that has to do with marketing on Facebook
- How marketers take advantage of mobile video
- The role Twitter plays in fact checking for journalists
- The rise of citizen journalists
- The sustainability of the business models associated with hyperlocal news
- People curating their own internet news

For the whole video and article see Scribe Media 

This “competition” between HuffPo and the NYT is a false one, whether comparing the size of the “newsrooms” (which does not simply equal the number of employees) or the size of their audiences. The question is not: Who is winning? The question is: What are their respective roles in the news ecosystem and why does that matter to their audiences and to journalism?

Julie Moos, Poynter, Top news sites lose unique visitors in May, while traffic peaks for many.

Moos points out that there’s a difference between pages views, unique visitors and, importantly, loyal visitors and what she calls site “addicts”

The Times, she reports, has a 51% loyalty rate and 15% of its audience is addicts.

Meanwhile, 66% of Huffington post visitors are simply passing by and 1% of its audience is addicts. 

FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver analyzed a month’s worth of citations to the Web’s top English language news sites. The top 30 above is a good indicator of reach and influence:

The way I’ve determined to study this is pretty simple. I’ve tracked the number of times that the publication’s name has appeared in Google News and Google Blog Search over the past month, followed by the word “reported.” For instance, to track the number of citations for The Chicago Tribune, I’d look for instances of the phrase “Chicago Tribune reported.” (In some cases, I’ve permitted multiple search terms for the same news outlet — for example, both “BBC reported” and “BBC News reported.”)
Obviously, there are other ways that a news outlet’s reporting might be referenced: “according to The Guardian” as opposed to “The Guardian reported.” So this won’t capture every time that an outlet’s reporting is cited; the idea, instead, is that it should be a representative sample.

Silver chose the sites analyzed by taking the top 100 blogs from Technorati, the top 100 circulation newspapers in the United States, the top 100 newspapers in global circulation and Memeorandum’s top 100 news sources.
His full list can be viewed here.

FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver analyzed a month’s worth of citations to the Web’s top English language news sites. The top 30 above is a good indicator of reach and influence:

The way I’ve determined to study this is pretty simple. I’ve tracked the number of times that the publication’s name has appeared in Google News and Google Blog Search over the past month, followed by the word “reported.” For instance, to track the number of citations for The Chicago Tribune, I’d look for instances of the phrase “Chicago Tribune reported.” (In some cases, I’ve permitted multiple search terms for the same news outlet — for example, both “BBC reported” and “BBC News reported.”)

Obviously, there are other ways that a news outlet’s reporting might be referenced: “according to The Guardian” as opposed to “The Guardian reported.” So this won’t capture every time that an outlet’s reporting is cited; the idea, instead, is that it should be a representative sample.

Silver chose the sites analyzed by taking the top 100 blogs from Technorati, the top 100 circulation newspapers in the United States, the top 100 newspapers in global circulation and Memeorandum’s top 100 news sources.

His full list can be viewed here.