posts about or somewhat related to ‘mediabugs’

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).
Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.
What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.
Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.
Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 
"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."
And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.

Forty-eight percent: that’s the number of news stories with objective, factual errors in them, according to Jonathan Stray who references a 2005 study by Scott R. Maier (PDF).

Stray, who works for the Associated Press, writes that error frequency is largely unchanged in the eight decades that researchers have studied it. Remarkably, only about 3% of all errors are corrected.

What to do? One method to tackle the problem is crowdsourcing. We’ve noted before that Norway’s VG Multimedia lets readers help correct typos with some 17,000 caught in 2010.

Then there’s Mediabugs, an elegant solution any news site can put on its Web site. It’s a small graphic that appears with each story — like any of the “share” buttons you commonly see — that links to a form where readers can submit errors from that story.

Scott Rosenberg, a Mediabugs co-founder, writes about Stray’s work over at Idea Lab and notes that the culture of news organizations often prevents them from transparently dealing with errors. 

"Journalists aren’t very good at self-scrutiny, and the hardbitten old newshound in each of us might scorn such work as navel-gazing," Rosenberg writes. "Maybe it would help if we think of it, instead, as accountability reporting — on ourselves."

And just maybe, we’ll understand that our first drafts of history really do need revision.

Can't "Recall" Facts? Corrections In A Viral News Age →

finger pointing

The Associated Press recently fell for a hoax, reporting that GE was giving back a $3.2 billion tax refund to the United States. A writer at USA Today made fun of the AP for that. Thing is? USA Today had both syndicated and Tweeted the flawed AP story — and he didn’t mention anything about it.

MediaBugs’ Mark Follman asks, now that content aggregation, curation, syndication and Twitter are pervasive in the news, what should disclosures and corrections look like, who should issue them and when?

From his post: 

There may…be an increasing tendency, navigating today’s ephemeral sea of news, to shrug off responsibility for nonproprietary content.

Is that understated, diplomatic or sarcastic? We can’t decide. We’d love to see someone create a technology that automatically corrects factually flawed stories in syndication, though.

Correction practices at major news sites are a mess →

MediaBugs’ first survey of national media correction practices examined the websites of 40 major newsrooms, including those of five leading cable TV news networks, from New York to Los Angeles. We also examined the websites of a dozen leading national magazines.

We found that of the websites of 35 leading daily newspapers we examined, 25 provide no link to a corrections page or archive of current and past corrections on their websites’ home pages and article pages. Only about half, 17 of the 35, provide a corrections policy of any kind (which we define broadly as any explicit statement regarding corrections practices). Sixty percent of the newspaper sites (21 of 35) do provide an explicit channel (email, phone, or Web form) for the public to report an error to the newsroom. However, in most cases this information isn’t prominent or easy to find.

The sites that do offer corrections-related content frequently bury it, in many cases requiring visitors to use the site’s search function. If you can find it, this information is often poorly organized and not easily navigated.

The websites of the five cable news networks we surveyed performed somewhat better. MSNBC, CNBC and ESPN all provide more thorough corrections content. CNN has an email form for reporting errors, but no corrections page or policy.

Fox News is the exception in the group. Apparently the Fox network never makes errors. We found no corrections content at all on its website.