Posts tagged metrics

Porn is Larger than You Think
Take Extreme Tech:

Xvideos, the largest porn site on the web with 4.4 billion page views per month, is three times the size of CNN or ESPN, and twice the size of Reddit.

And add Pacific Standard:

And while the average visitor to your typical news site spends only a few minutes there, porn visitors linger for four or five times as long.

And you’re left with an FJP imponderable: Porn sites, where for some unknown reason, people linger just a little bit longer.
Image: Manipulated detail, Ugh, by Patrick Charles. Flickr/Creative Commons.

Porn is Larger than You Think

Take Extreme Tech:

Xvideos, the largest porn site on the web with 4.4 billion page views per month, is three times the size of CNN or ESPN, and twice the size of Reddit.

And add Pacific Standard:

And while the average visitor to your typical news site spends only a few minutes there, porn visitors linger for four or five times as long.

And you’re left with an FJP imponderable: Porn sites, where for some unknown reason, people linger just a little bit longer.

Image: Manipulated detail, Ugh, by Patrick Charles. Flickr/Creative Commons.

Age Distribution on Social Networks
Image: By Pingdom with data from Google Ad Planner via Bit Rebels. Select to embiggen.

Age Distribution on Social Networks

Image: By Pingdom with data from Google Ad Planner via Bit Rebels. Select to embiggen.

Social Media is Bullshit
So there’s this, written by BJ Mendelson and published by St. Martins Press.
The premise of the book is that social media friends and followers “mean nothing to you and your business without old-fashioned, real-world connections.” Or, as the book site would have it:

We live in a world where it’s far easier to make money telling people how to get rich using the Internet than it is to actually get rich using it.

Which, I guess, would be fine if getting rich was the only metric one used for measuring their social media efforts.
Otherwise, I haven’t heard anyone ever say that real-world connections are no longer needed. Just the opposite, that our digital social lives help expand our ability to make real world connections. 
Anyway, I’ll be adding this to my reading list. I assume the argument is more sophisticated than little blurbs would have it. Besides, it’s always good to hear from a contrarian, even one who leverages his 770,000 Twitter followers to write a book and throw a snarky title on it. Hat tip to the marketing department on that one.
Meantime, here’s an interview with him and Andrew Keen, another Internet contrarian, via Techcrunch. And here’s a free chapter from the book. — Michael
Bonus: Trying to figure out your social media ROI? There’s a conference in New York for that.

Social Media is Bullshit

So there’s this, written by BJ Mendelson and published by St. Martins Press.

The premise of the book is that social media friends and followers “mean nothing to you and your business without old-fashioned, real-world connections.” Or, as the book site would have it:

We live in a world where it’s far easier to make money telling people how to get rich using the Internet than it is to actually get rich using it.

Which, I guess, would be fine if getting rich was the only metric one used for measuring their social media efforts.

Otherwise, I haven’t heard anyone ever say that real-world connections are no longer needed. Just the opposite, that our digital social lives help expand our ability to make real world connections. 

Anyway, I’ll be adding this to my reading list. I assume the argument is more sophisticated than little blurbs would have it. Besides, it’s always good to hear from a contrarian, even one who leverages his 770,000 Twitter followers to write a book and throw a snarky title on it. Hat tip to the marketing department on that one.

Meantime, here’s an interview with him and Andrew Keen, another Internet contrarian, via Techcrunch. And here’s a free chapter from the book. — Michael

Bonus: Trying to figure out your social media ROI? There’s a conference in New York for that.

It's a Facebook World

Via Experian Hitwise:

  1. Facebook.com received 9% of all US Internet visits in April 2012.
  2. Facebook.com received more than 1.6 billion visits a week and averaged more than 229 million US visits a day for the year-to-date.
  3. 1 in every 5 page views in the US occurred on Facebook.com.
  4. Facebook.com has received more than 400 billion page views this year in the US.
  5. The average visit time on Facebook.com is 20 minutes.
  6. The Facebook.com audience skews more female (56%) than male.

Read through for nine more Facebook stats.

Top 10 Broadcast Media Websites (by US Market Share of Visits). March 2012.
Via.

Top 10 Broadcast Media Websites (by US Market Share of Visits). March 2012.

Via.

It’s a revolution. We’re really just getting under way. But the march of quantification, made possible by enormous new sources of data, will sweep through academia, business and government. There is no area that is going to be untouched.

Gary King, director of Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science, to the New York Times. The Age of Big Data.

To grasp the potential impact of Big Data, look to the microscope, says Erik Brynjolfsson, an economist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management. The microscope, invented four centuries ago, allowed people to see and measure things as never before — at the cellular level. It was a revolution in measurement.

Data measurement, Professor Brynjolfsson explains, is the modern equivalent of the microscope. Google searches, Facebook posts and Twitter messages, for example, make it possible to measure behavior and sentiment in fine detail and as it happens.

Ditto all the data producing sensors in industrial equipment, buying trends at the Walmarts of the world, traffic patterns and delivery routes analyzed by the likes of UPS, and on and on and on.

A great overview for those trying to understand what the Big Data fuss is all about.

Related: Big Data was a big deal at the World Economic Forum. A report issued from it called Big Data, Big Impact: New Possibilities for International Development can be downloaded here.

We’re at the start of a revolution in the ways marketers and media intrude in — and shape — our lives. Every day, most if not all Americans who use the internet, along with hundreds of millions of other users from all over the planet, are being quietly peeked at, poked, analyzed and tagged as they move through the online world. Governments undoubtedly conduct a good deal of snooping, more in some parts of the world than in others. But in North America, Europe, and many other places, companies that work for marketers have taken the lead in secretly slicing and dicing the actions and backgrounds of huge populations on a virtually minute-by-minute basis. Their goal is to find out how to activate individuals’ buying impulses so they can sell us stuff more efficiently than ever before. But their work has broader social and cultural consequences as well. It is destroying traditional publishing ethics by forcing media outlets to adapt their editorial content to advertisers’ public-relations needs and slice-and-dice demands. And it is performing a highly controversial form of social profiling and discrimination by customizing our media content on the basis of marketing reputations we don’t even know we have.

Joseph Turow, The Atlantic. A Guide to the Digital Advertising Industry That’s Watching Your Every Click.

A longread excerpt from Turow’s new book The Daily You.

Predicting the Spread of News

Researchers are analyzing if its possible to predict how widely news items will spread before publishing and promoting them via social networks.

By analyzing past performance of popular Twitter posts, the researchers from UCLA and HP Labs believe they can predict ranges of popularity on Twitter with 84% accuracy.

Via Technology Review:

[Bernardo Huberman] wants to know whether their is something about the news stories themselves that determine their popularity. In other words, he’s looking for factors that determine how popular a news story will be before it is even published.

To find out, Huberman and his colleagues examined the content of news stories during a single week in August last year as measured by the news feed aggregator Feedzilla. They scored each article based on four criteria: the news source that generates and posts the article; the category of news; the subjectivity of the language; and the people and things named in the article.

They then measured the way these news stories spread across the Twitter network to see which became popular and how quickly. They used this to work out how an article’s score in each criterion is linked to its eventual popularity.

Technology Review rightfully points out that this could have a profound effect on how newsrooms assign and schedule their editorial. It also suggests that we could have “social checkers” in our word processing apps and CMS’s that work similarly to spell checkers. The social checker would help predict how popular our stories will become.

An interesting metric even if it ignores the simple fact that often the most important stories aren’t the ones that reach the most eyeballs.

StudyThe Pulse of News in Social Media: Forecasting Popularity, via arxiv (PDF).

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage
Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.
Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.
H/T: Mashable.

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage

Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.

Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.

H/T: Mashable.

14 tools to help you measure your social media metrics

Before you start marketing on social sites, choose the tools you need that will help you reach your marketing goals and save you both time and money. Below are 14 tools you may use to help you more effectively build a social media platform.

To see all the tools (some are free, others are paid) please visit 1st Web Designer

14 tools to help you measure your social media metrics

Before you start marketing on social sites, choose the tools you need that will help you reach your marketing goals and save you both time and money. Below are 14 tools you may use to help you more effectively build a social media platform.

To see all the tools (some are free, others are paid) please visit 1st Web Designer


 
IAC’s Diller: Daily Beast/Newsweek Losses Are More Than Tolerable
“I look at Newsweek as a startup and we’re building a serious asset in new publishing,” Diller said “What I mean by that a completely new model of publishing in terms of being both an offline magazine and an online one. We’re the only people taking an original online product, The Beast, which has grown phenomenally, and fused it with an existing print publication. We now have 10 million uniques, which is quite strong.”

IAC’s Diller: Daily Beast/Newsweek Losses Are More Than Tolerable

“I look at Newsweek as a startup and we’re building a serious asset in new publishing,” Diller said “What I mean by that a completely new model of publishing in terms of being both an offline magazine and an online one. We’re the only people taking an original online product, The Beast, which has grown phenomenally, and fused it with an existing print publication. We now have 10 million uniques, which is quite strong.”
No Prime Time for the Smart Phone
In a study of global smart phone use, Zokem, an analytics firm, discovers that User engagement patterns remain relatively consistent throughout the day with a brief afternoon spike when calls are being made.
However, before 8am and after 6pm, Users tend to to get more playful, spending more time with Web browsing, social networking and entertainment apps, and less time with voice and messaging apps. 

No Prime Time for the Smart Phone

In a study of global smart phone use, Zokem, an analytics firm, discovers that User engagement patterns remain relatively consistent throughout the day with a brief afternoon spike when calls are being made.

However, before 8am and after 6pm, Users tend to to get more playful, spending more time with Web browsing, social networking and entertainment apps, and less time with voice and messaging apps. 

Why are we in this again?

Brian Storm, founder of MediaStorm, says page views are the wrong metric for news organizations to judge their success. Lost in the shuffle is journalism’s original civic responsibility.

H/T: StoryTell.in: How do we Measure the News

In US, StumbleUpon Now Largest Driver of Site Traffic
Via GigaOm:

Web discovery engine StumbleUpon is now the biggest traffic driver among social media websites in the US, according to global web analytics service StatCounter. The company unseated Facebook at the top during June 2011, according to the latest StatCounter social media data. StatCounter tracks hits to over 3 million websites, and its social media data is gathered by analyzing every hit referred by a social media site.

In US, StumbleUpon Now Largest Driver of Site Traffic

Via GigaOm:

Web discovery engine StumbleUpon is now the biggest traffic driver among social media websites in the US, according to global web analytics service StatCounter. The company unseated Facebook at the top during June 2011, according to the latest StatCounter social media data. StatCounter tracks hits to over 3 million websites, and its social media data is gathered by analyzing every hit referred by a social media site.