posts about or somewhat related to ‘mobile phones’

Twitter to be available on mobile phones without Internet →

The Cost of Mobile Broadband Plans Around the World
For 2 GB of mobile broadband Internet access, the U.S. is at the top (or bottom) of the heap, in terms of price, beating out such laggards as Nigeria and South Africa (where a carrier pigeon was able to deliver data faster than a hard-wired Internet connection).
H/T: GigaOm

The Cost of Mobile Broadband Plans Around the World

For 2 GB of mobile broadband Internet access, the U.S. is at the top (or bottom) of the heap, in terms of price, beating out such laggards as Nigeria and South Africa (where a carrier pigeon was able to deliver data faster than a hard-wired Internet connection).

H/T: GigaOm

It’s almost March so we’ll mostly promise that this is a last look back on 2010.

And while the video is created MobileFuture.org, an industry group, it’s tough to come away with any conclusion besides: people really like their phones.

Infographic: World Mobile Browser Market Share

Nokia’s share of the world mobile browsing market shows remarkable disparity, and this chart from iCrossing provides good insight into why the Finnish handset giant made a deal with Microsoft to start running Windows Phone 7 on its devices.

Nokia’s Symbian OS runs nearly half of all phones in Tunisia, and in Egypt, this figure climbs to 80 percent, but figure is quite anemic in much of Western Europe, the U.S. and other mature markets.

PaidContent has more analysis:

—Microsoft’s Windows Phone does not have a big enough marketshare in any one market to make it into the charts. For that matter, neither does webOS.

—Nokia (NYSE: NOK) dominates by wide margins in developing markets, but in mature markets Nokia is either too small to make it into the rankings, or it is low on the list. It’s striking how consistent that is, and it makes one wonder if the company should be pursuing something more dual as a strategy, opting for Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) in those markets where it has nothing to lose, and staying with its familiar products where they are still going strong.

As far as dowries go, Nokia’s gift to Microsoft has the potential to make for a happy marriage. With no discernible presence in the mobile browser space for Microsoft, this is an especially gutsy move, and potentially disastrous for Nokia.

The Internet, social networks and mobile phones have helped MENA protestors organize and communicate. CNN has an interactive that maps how popular these tools are in various countries. 
Crazy that Saudi Arabia has 174 cellphones for every 100 people.

The Internet, social networks and mobile phones have helped MENA protestors organize and communicate. CNN has an interactive that maps how popular these tools are in various countries. 

Crazy that Saudi Arabia has 174 cellphones for every 100 people.

Infographic: How The World Has Changed: 2000 vs. 2010

The future is not what it used to be.

Gawker Media site i09 has compiled this juicy infographic detailing many ways in which the world has changed in the intervening decade since the start of the 21st century.

Most notable among the factoids is the explosion of the world Internet population, increasing from 361 Million in the year 2000, to today’s tally of 1.96 Billion.  The proliferation of mobile phones is another noteworthy statistic: There were 719 Million cell phone subscriptions in 2000 and in 2010 that number shot up to 5.3 Billion. Although the technology underpinning the Worldewide Web, and our cellular communications network have existed in some form for decades, both could easily be considered to be in their infancy 10 years ago.

Motorola researcher and executive Martin Cooper placed the first cellular phone call on Apr. 3, 1973 on a device which weighed 2.5 pounds and was nine inches long. It took another 10 years before the first adopters began buying slimmed-down (16 ounce) devices for $3,000 ($7,400 in today’s money) even though they had a talk time of just 35 minutes and required 10 hours to charge. 

It’s not hard to imagine a future in which the cellular phone (or tablet) is the primary device for people to access content online. Throughout much of the developing world a cell phone can now be bought for $20, which is clearly fueling the huge uptick in mobile subscriptions.

The numbers should speak for themselves, and it will be interesting to see which media organizations capitalize on these exciting trends, and who spends another decade lamenting audience fragmentation and declining print revenues.  

(Source: Laughing Squid)