Posts tagged mother jones

Now fate finds Republicans, in the waning days of the 2012 campaign, faced with video of one candidate expressing his total contempt, his unfettered disdain for half of the country. Only it’s not the guy they’ve been trying to take out. It’s the guy they nominated.

Adam Serwer, Mother Jones. The Romney Video and the Right’s Quixotic Quest for the “Real Obama”

By now you’ve certainly heard something about Mother Jones posting a video and transcript of a speech Romney gave in May at a private fundraiser. He talked about what he sees as entitled voters, and the failed peace process in Israel. Here’s a quick roundup to help wade through what’s now a huge story:

While talking to those who share a lot of his own opinions, Romney let himself say things he wouldn’t say elsewhere.

On the 47% he believes will vote for Obama: "My job is not to worry about them. I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives."

He says earlier in the video that they don’t pay taxes, which Ezra Klein considers in this article and ultimately dismisses.

On Israel and Palestine: "And I look at the Palestinians not wanting to see peace anyway, for political purposes, committed to the destruction and elimination of Israel, and these throny issues, and I say, ‘There’s just no way.’"

Here’s an article from Prospect that considers the implications of what they refer to as Romney throwing "the entire region under a bus."

FJP: More to come.

Where Are the Women Writers?
Mother Jones:

They called it the Count, and the concept was simple: Tally up how many women get published in some of the world’s top literary magazines and journals, compare it with the number of men gracing those pages, and slap the results into a pie chart. Red for men, blue for women. The result was a lot of big red pie slices. First published in 2011, they conveyed a clear fact: From Harpers to The New Yorker to The Atlantic, it’s still very much a man’s world. Roughly 65 to 75 percent of the space in the prestigious magazines went to male writers.
The Count is the brainchild of two accomplished poets, Cate Marvin and Erin Belieu. In 2009, the duo founded VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, a nonprofit that acts as part online community, part advocate and agitator for women of letters. The idea, Belieu says, came in a “moment of loathing and terror and revolutionary spark.”
They intended the Count to be a conversation starter, and it certainly has been: After they published the first round, some major magazine editors slammed the numbers as unscientific or meaningless by themselves. Others took them to heart and vowed to work harder for parity. “We’ve got to do better,”New Yorkereditor David Remnick said of his magazine’s results. The conversation heated up again this February, after the second tally was published.

VIDA seeks to help publications up their submissions by women writers:

We’d like to be helpful. We’d like to partner with these places. A lot of editors are like, “So few women writers submit.” Would you like us to put you in touch with some? Because I know a lot of them. I know some fantastic writers. That list is deep, so call me, David Remnick. Call me because we can help, and we want to help.
We don’t want this to be a negative conversation. We want positive gains to come out of it. But you know what? Civil rights made people uncomfortable. Gay rights made people uncomfortable. Sometimes you have to be uncomfortable to change your perspective. If you’ve discovered it’s something you need to care about, then talk to VIDA. We’d love to be of use. That’s what we’re here for.

FJP: An interesting study. See all the other pie-charts here.

Where Are the Women Writers?


Mother Jones:

They called it the Count, and the concept was simple: Tally up how many women get published in some of the world’s top literary magazines and journals, compare it with the number of men gracing those pages, and slap the results into a pie chart. Red for men, blue for women. The result was a lot of big red pie slices. First published in 2011, they conveyed a clear fact: From Harpers to The New Yorker to The Atlantic, it’s still very much a man’s world. Roughly 65 to 75 percent of the space in the prestigious magazines went to male writers.

The Count is the brainchild of two accomplished poets, Cate Marvin and Erin Belieu. In 2009, the duo founded VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, a nonprofit that acts as part online community, part advocate and agitator for women of letters. The idea, Belieu says, came in a “moment of loathing and terror and revolutionary spark.”

They intended the Count to be a conversation starter, and it certainly has been: After they published the first round, some major magazine editors slammed the numbers as unscientific or meaningless by themselves. Others took them to heart and vowed to work harder for parity. “We’ve got to do better,”New Yorkereditor David Remnick said of his magazine’s results. The conversation heated up again this February, after the second tally was published.

VIDA seeks to help publications up their submissions by women writers:

We’d like to be helpful. We’d like to partner with these places. A lot of editors are like, “So few women writers submit.” Would you like us to put you in touch with some? Because I know a lot of them. I know some fantastic writers. That list is deep, so call me, David Remnick. Call me because we can help, and we want to help.

We don’t want this to be a negative conversation. We want positive gains to come out of it. But you know what? Civil rights made people uncomfortable. Gay rights made people uncomfortable. Sometimes you have to be uncomfortable to change your perspective. If you’ve discovered it’s something you need to care about, then talk to VIDA. We’d love to be of use. That’s what we’re here for.

FJP: An interesting study. See all the other pie-charts here.



Riots that started in London are spreading across the UK. We explain what’s going on, and why.
—By Hannah Levintova and Samantha Oltman



Mother Jones is a great source for explainers. This explainer on the London Riots is another great example of explainer journalism. 

Riots that started in London are spreading across the UK. We explain what’s going on, and why.