Posts tagged with ‘mozilla’

Getting Web Literate
The Mozilla Foundation released its specification for a Web Literacy Standard. This, in the foundation and extended community’s view, is what people should know when participating on the Web.
Topics range from understanding the credibility of a Web site you’ve landed on; the ability to compare “information from a number of sources to judge the trustworthiness of content;” composing content for the Web (basic HTML, how to embed a video), remixing found content into something new; and basic coding with script frameworks, loops and arrays among other topics.
Take a look and see how literate you may be.
Educators teaching the Internets should explore the standard, according to Doug Belshaw, one of the standard’s creators, and consider incorporating it into their curricula.
If you’re interested in participating in the ongoing creating of the Web Literacy Standard, Mozilla places its open calls for ideas and consensus here. 

Getting Web Literate

The Mozilla Foundation released its specification for a Web Literacy Standard. This, in the foundation and extended community’s view, is what people should know when participating on the Web.

Topics range from understanding the credibility of a Web site you’ve landed on; the ability to compare “information from a number of sources to judge the trustworthiness of content;” composing content for the Web (basic HTML, how to embed a video), remixing found content into something new; and basic coding with script frameworks, loops and arrays among other topics.

Take a look and see how literate you may be.

Educators teaching the Internets should explore the standard, according to Doug Belshaw, one of the standard’s creators, and consider incorporating it into their curricula.

If you’re interested in participating in the ongoing creating of the Web Literacy Standard, Mozilla places its open calls for ideas and consensus here

Mañana: Knight-Mozilla OpenNews Fellowship Deadline →

With apologies for the late notice, spend the rest of today and your Saturday applying for a Knight-Mozilla OpenNews Fellowship.

Hacks and Hackers, a brief background:

Knight-Mozilla Fellows spend 10 months embedded with our partner newsrooms. Our Fellows are developers, technologists, civic hackers, and data crunchers who are paid to work with the community inside and outside of their newsroom to develop open-source projects. Fellows work in the open by sharing their code and their discoveries, helping to strengthen and build journalism’s toolbox.

Via Daniel Sinker, head honcho for all of this, Looking vs Leaping:

For the last two months, we’ve been looking for people who love to code—developers, civic hackers, journo-coders, data crunchers, stats geeks, and more—to join us at OpenNews as Knight-Mozilla Fellows, where you’ll spend 10 months creating open-source code, hacking around the globe, working in some of the world’s best newsrooms, and helping to build out journalism’s codebase on the open web. We’ve been looking for two months. There are only two days left. Leap.

Our five fellows will spend the ten months of their fellowship embedded in some of the best news organizations in the world: The New York Times, ProPublica, the Texas Tribune, La Nacion, and (in a joint fellowship) Ushahidi and Internews Kenya. There, you’ll have the opportunity to develop next-generation tools that are tempered in the real-world fires of breaking news. You’ll be in the room when news breaks and you’ll write code to react to it. You’ll create libraries and tools that will shape reporting on the world around you. You’ll write code that makes a difference. Leap.

In addition to working with the incredible colleagues at your newsroom hosts, you’ll also be part of a cohort of fellows—five total in 2014—who will be your collaborators, your troublemakers, and your friends during this adventure. Over your ten months, you’ll have ample opportunity to code together, travel together, and collaborate on ideas and experiments. You’ll make connections that will ripple out past your fellowship year and into the life that grows beyond it.

The Fellowship application is here.

Source
The Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project has launched Source, a repository of “journalism code” and articles about it.
For example, there’s currently Ruby client for interacting with the New York Times’ campaign finance API and a Guardian Javascript library to manage data behind client-side visualizations.
As OpenNews lead Daniel Sinker describes it on his Tumblr:

Through feature articles that dig into the specifics of the code and the motivations that behind it, through an index to open code repositories produced by the journo-code community, and an index to that community itself, Source connects the many lines of code that make up journalism today with the people that write them. We’ve built relationships between code, people, and organizations deep into the data models of Source because we know that code is always a reflection of the individuals that create it and that those individuals combine to create a thriving community.

Source: Journalism code and the people who make it.

Source

The Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project has launched Source, a repository of “journalism code” and articles about it.

For example, there’s currently Ruby client for interacting with the New York Times’ campaign finance API and a Guardian Javascript library to manage data behind client-side visualizations.

As OpenNews lead Daniel Sinker describes it on his Tumblr:

Through feature articles that dig into the specifics of the code and the motivations that behind it, through an index to open code repositories produced by the journo-code community, and an index to that community itself, Source connects the many lines of code that make up journalism today with the people that write them. We’ve built relationships between code, people, and organizations deep into the data models of Source because we know that code is always a reflection of the individuals that create it and that those individuals combine to create a thriving community.

Source: Journalism code and the people who make it.

OpenNews: Four Weeks to Apply for the 2013 Fellowship! →

sinker:

In four short weeks, the opportunity to apply to become a 2012/13 Knight-Mozilla Fellow will come to an end. We’ve been getting applications from developers, hackers, data scientists, and engineers all over the world—Kyrgyzstan to Kenya, San Francisco to Santiago—but we want your

FJP: We’re late on this so there are now just three weeks to apply. Read through for details on the amazing opportunity.

(Source: sinker)

Got Popcorn?
Mozilla’s released Popcorn 1.0, an HTML5 media toolkit that reimagines what can be done with Web video.
Via the Mozilla Blog:

Popcorn allows web filmmakers to amp up interactivity around their movies, harnessing the web to expand their creations in new ways. Popcorn uses Javascript to link real-time social media, news feeds, data visualizations, and other context directly to online video, pulling the web into the action in real time. The result is a new form of  cinema that works more like the web itself: interactive, social,  and rich with real-time context and possibilities that continue to evolve long after filming wraps.
Director Kat Cizek used Popcorn and other HTML5 tools like WebGL to create One Millionth Tower, the latest installment in the NFB’s Emmy award-winning Highrise series. One Millionth Tower brings residents from a dilapidated Toronto apartment complex together with architects and designers, imagining how they can revitalize their homes and neighborhood together. The film then uses the magic of animators, web developers and Popcorn to bring these ideas to life, all through a multi-layered, three-dimensional landscape that runs directly in the web browser.

To see it in action, watch the One Millionth Tower over at Wired. 
To give it a whirl, learn about and download Popcorn at Mozilla.

Got Popcorn?

Mozilla’s released Popcorn 1.0, an HTML5 media toolkit that reimagines what can be done with Web video.

Via the Mozilla Blog:

Popcorn allows web filmmakers to amp up interactivity around their movies, harnessing the web to expand their creations in new ways. Popcorn uses Javascript to link real-time social media, news feeds, data visualizations, and other context directly to online video, pulling the web into the action in real time. The result is a new form of  cinema that works more like the web itself: interactive, social,  and rich with real-time context and possibilities that continue to evolve long after filming wraps.

Director Kat Cizek used Popcorn and other HTML5 tools like WebGL to create One Millionth Tower, the latest installment in the NFB’s Emmy award-winning Highrise series. One Millionth Tower brings residents from a dilapidated Toronto apartment complex together with architects and designers, imagining how they can revitalize their homes and neighborhood together. The film then uses the magic of animators, web developers and Popcorn to bring these ideas to life, all through a multi-layered, three-dimensional landscape that runs directly in the web browser.

To see it in action, watch the One Millionth Tower over at Wired. 

To give it a whirl, learn about and download Popcorn at Mozilla.

 
Knight-Mozilla names news technology fellowship winners

The five, who were named at the Mozilla Festival held in London this weekend, were among 300 so-called “news hackers” who applied responded to various challenges such as coming up with a “killer app for news”. A panel then selected 60 of the best ideas based on re-usable, open-source technology that benefits the web as a whole. Five were then chosen from the long list and will take up their new paid roles around the start 2012. About the Fellows Laurian Gridinoc – Fellow at BBC While studying medicine Gridinoc co-founded a brand strategy and interactive consultancy in Romania. He then followed his interest in the semantic web through a master in computational linguistics and several years of research into semantic navigation at Knowledge Media Institute (Open University). For the past year he has been implementing applications using semantic web technologies at the technology innovation companyTalis. Nicola Hughes – Fellow at the Guardian After academic excursions in the fields of physics, zoology, anthropology and journalism Hughes started her media career at CNN in London. Whilst working as a digital media producer she started blogging and tweeting about data journalism (@DataMinerUK). She left CNN to join a data scraping start up ScraperWiki and to gain coding skills. 

Mark Boas – Fellow at Al Jazeera English Boas makes, teaches, writes about and promotes new and open web technologies. Co-founder ofHappyworm, a tiny entrepreneurial web agency and makers of the jPlayer media framework. A lover of all things audio, his passion often drives his work and is currently enjoying the challenge of taking audio “somewhere new” with his Hyperaudioexperiments. 

Cole Gillespie – Fellow at Zeit Online Gillespie is a JavaScript developer from North Carolina Appalachians. In recent years he has spent his time in Raleigh, North Carolina, working with various companies including Project Mastermind, National Geographic, CNN and IBM. He spends most of his free time playing music, hacking open source projects or trolling in IRC trying to keep up with the web’s rapid evolution. 

Dan Schultz – Fellow at the Boston GlobeSchultz is a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab studying in the information ecology group. At the lab he is a research associate at the Center for Civic Media. Before MIT Dan received a BS in information systems from Carnegie Mellon University, and was awarded a Knight News Challenge grant in 2007 to write about “connecting people, content, and community.”


for the rest of the article, see journalism.co.uk

Knight-Mozilla names news technology fellowship winners

The five, who were named at the Mozilla Festival held in London this weekend, were among 300 so-called “news hackers” who applied responded to various challenges such as coming up with a “killer app for news”. 

A panel then selected 60 of the best ideas based on re-usable, open-source technology that benefits the web as a whole. Five were then chosen from the long list and will take up their new paid roles around the start 2012. 

About the Fellows 

Laurian GridinocLaurian Gridinoc – Fellow at BBC 

While studying medicine Gridinoc co-founded a brand strategy and interactive consultancy in Romania. He then followed his interest in the semantic web through a master in computational linguistics and several years of research into semantic navigation at Knowledge Media Institute (Open University). For the past year he has been implementing applications using semantic web technologies at the technology innovation companyTalis

Nicola HughesNicola Hughes – Fellow at the Guardian 

After academic excursions in the fields of physics, zoology, anthropology and journalism Hughes started her media career at CNN in London. Whilst working as a digital media producer she started blogging and tweeting about data journalism (@DataMinerUK). She left CNN to join a data scraping start up ScraperWiki and to gain coding skills. 


Mark BoasMark Boas – Fellow at Al Jazeera English 

Boas makes, teaches, writes about and promotes new and open web technologies. Co-founder ofHappyworm, a tiny entrepreneurial web agency and makers of the jPlayer media framework. A lover of all things audio, his passion often drives his work and is currently enjoying the challenge of taking audio “somewhere new” with his Hyperaudioexperiments. 


Cole GillespieCole Gillespie – Fellow at Zeit Online 

Gillespie is a JavaScript developer from North Carolina Appalachians. In recent years he has spent his time in Raleigh, North Carolina, working with various companies including Project Mastermind, National Geographic, CNN and IBM. He spends most of his free time playing music, hacking open source projects or trolling in IRC trying to keep up with the web’s rapid evolution. 


Dan SchultzDan Schultz – Fellow at the Boston Globe

Schultz is a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab studying in the information ecology group. At the lab he is a research associate at the Center for Civic Media. Before MIT Dan received a BS in information systems from Carnegie Mellon University, and was awarded a Knight News Challenge grant in 2007 to write about “connecting people, content, and community.”

for the rest of the article, see journalism.co.uk

Pick a site, any site, and “share” buttons are littered all over the place.
Mozilla/Firefox is asking why not bring that basic functionality up to the browser. 
Via Webmonkey:

Mozilla wants to help stop the proliferation of “share this” badges currently cluttering the web. These days nearly every page you visit is plastered with dozens of icons offering to like, or tweet, or +1, or thumbs up, or otherwise tell your friends what you think of the page in question. The clutter can be distracting or even overwhelming and, if Mozilla has anything to say about it, unnecessary.
Firefox has a plan to clean up the clutter and move the sharing power into the browser itself. Mozilla Labs has announced a new project, Firefox Share, a Firefox add-on that makes it easy to share webpages on Twitter or Facebook right from the Firefox URL bar.
Firefox Share is currently an alpha quality release and may have some bugs, but if that doesn’t bother you head on over to the download page and install it (Firefox Share does not require a restart).
Once installed the new add-on adds a paper airplane icon to the URL bar; click that icon and a drop down panel allows you to post to Twitter or Facebook or e-mail a message to a friend.

Of course, there are already a number of plugins, add-ons and extensions for different browsers to accomplish this but offloading this functionality from site to browser as a native function is an interesting idea. 

Pick a site, any site, and “share” buttons are littered all over the place.

Mozilla/Firefox is asking why not bring that basic functionality up to the browser. 

Via Webmonkey:

Mozilla wants to help stop the proliferation of “share this” badges currently cluttering the web. These days nearly every page you visit is plastered with dozens of icons offering to like, or tweet, or +1, or thumbs up, or otherwise tell your friends what you think of the page in question. The clutter can be distracting or even overwhelming and, if Mozilla has anything to say about it, unnecessary.

Firefox has a plan to clean up the clutter and move the sharing power into the browser itself. Mozilla Labs has announced a new project, Firefox Share, a Firefox add-on that makes it easy to share webpages on Twitter or Facebook right from the Firefox URL bar.

Firefox Share is currently an alpha quality release and may have some bugs, but if that doesn’t bother you head on over to the download page and install it (Firefox Share does not require a restart).

Once installed the new add-on adds a paper airplane icon to the URL bar; click that icon and a drop down panel allows you to post to Twitter or Facebook or e-mail a message to a friend.

Of course, there are already a number of plugins, add-ons and extensions for different browsers to accomplish this but offloading this functionality from site to browser as a native function is an interesting idea. 

AP Embraces Mozilla’s ‘Do Not Track’ Header →

A new feature in Firefox 4 is support for something called a DNT header. Activate it in your browser preferences and Firefox will tell servers that you do not want to accept any tracking cookies.

This is a big deal for lots of people, both those who have privacy concerns and advertisers who’d like to allay those concerns, plop a cookie on your browser, track you as you go about your business and serve up behavioral ads based on that business.

Publishers like tracking because it helps them know who their visitors are which, in turn, lets them work with marketers and advertisers to deliver high valued, premium ads. 

All of which makes it all the more remarkable that the Associated Press is endorsing DNT headers.

Via Wired:

Mozilla announced today that the AP News Registry has implemented support for the DNT header across 800 news sites, which see more than 175 million unique visitors every month. That’s a huge shot in the arm for Do Not Track, which was previously a great idea, but one with little real-world application.

Starting today, provided you turn on the DNT preference in Firefox 4, the AP News Registry will no longer set any cookies.

Knight, Mozilla Partner to Bring Innovation to the News →

Kudos to Knight for specifically looking to partner with an organization that understands and does Open Source.

Via the Knight Foundation Blog:

Today we announce the Knight-Mozilla News Technology partnership, a $2.5 million project, featuring news technology fellowships and an innovation challenge. The partnership will accelerate media innovation by solving technological challenges, developing new news products and services of the Web and embedding technologists in news organizations. Everything done through the Knight-Mozilla Innovation Challenge and by Knight-Mozilla Fellows will be open, providing knowledge, solutions and open-source products that are valuable and useful to the whole field.

This partnership spurs media innovation and helps news organizations facing the same or similar challenges understand how to solve them. Strategically, this aligns with recommendation number one of the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy to direct efforts toward innovation that promotes quality journalism.

Pilot programs will be run with the Boston Globe, the BBC, The Guardian and Zeit Online, among others.

School of Webcraft: CSS, JavaScript & HTML5 →

Mark your calendars: registration for this year’s School of Webcraft opens January 8. Created by Mozilla and open education project Peer 2 Peer University, courses will focus on tools and technologies that keep the Web open such as CSS, JavaScript and the burgeoning HTML 5.

Courses are free and run online for 6-10 weeks. More information is here, and registration over here.

A little more background:

The School of Webcraft is a joint partnership between Mozilla and Peer 2 Peer University dedicated to providing web developer training that’s free, open and globally accessible. Our peer-led courses are powered by learners, mentors and contributors like you. Our goal: make it easy for people around the world to gain skills and build careers using open web technology. (Learn more about the School of Webcraft’s vision and plan here.)

Participate, learn and bring new and updated programming Fu back to the newsroom.