Posts tagged multimedia

Welcome to the Morgue

A few floors under Times Square is the “Morgue,” a New York Times archive repository of clippings and photographs dating back to the 1870s.

The archive holds 6-8 million physical photos, according to Jeff Roth, the morgue’s manager, about 98% of which have never been digitized.

"It’s an incredible collection of forgotten history," says the documentary filmmaker Katerina Cizek in the video above. Cizek spent a week in the morgue to gather materials for HIGHRISE, an interactive series created by The New York Times’s Op-Docs department and the National Film Board of Canada that explores the history of vertical living.

Haven’t seen it? We recommend you start exploring it now. Want more information about the multi-year series? Visit the NFB.

Slam poetry + Journalism = Off/Page Project

via Mashable:

Youth Speaks, in partnership with the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), officially launched the Off/Page project on Wednesday, providing “a multimedia platform for young people to investigate the issues and stories that would otherwise be silenced.” The aim is to spark a conversation among its national network of youth poets on the issues that most impact them in their communities. Taking place both online and in real life, the project is a groundbreaking blend of slam poetry, multimedia storytelling and investigative reporting.

[…] One of the first young poets to utilize the Off/Page project’s unique combination of old-school investigative journalism and modern storytelling tools is Monica Mendoza, a 19-year-old from Oakland. She collaborated with the CIR on a spoken word poem, “Whispers From the Field,” which she wrote after being inspired and informed by “Rape in the Fields,” a year-long CIR investigation into the sexual abuse allegations levied by predominantly immigrant farm workers against their overseers.

For young but experienced storytellers like Mendoza and Merchant, and for those not yet connected with a group of poets in their community, Off/Page is a digital touchstone, bringing what has previously been a primarily in-person experience on the theater stage to the worldwide public square created by digital media.

"To show them that at any moment, at any time, their voice can be represented: That’s the key thing,” Vadi says. “Telling young people that their voices matter, that their voices have the potential to create social change.”

Video: Youtube, Behind the Off/Page Project (Runtime - 5:41)

Snow Fall, Meet Firestorm
If you haven’t checked it out yet—and I hope you have—The Guardian’s Firestorm, a Snow Fall-esque interactive long-form multimedia piece came out last month and it’s completely stunning.
From Poynter’s story on the teamwork required to put it together:

“I think you have to capture people’s hearts,” Francesca Panetta, special projects editor of interactive storytelling projects, said in a phone interview. “As with all kinds of storytelling, you can’t lose sight of that need to connect and touch people, whether it’s writing or radio or a complicated interactive.”
Firestorm is remarkable for a number of reasons, including the stellar video images and the subtle way that looping video is used behind the written story. The integration between words and video is handled with such finesse that the one doesn’t distract from the other.
“We’re very happy with the subtlety,” Panetta said.
The chapter navigation uses clear images and concise icons and labels, ensuring it’s always clear where you are in the story.
A project like Firestorm or The New York Times’ Pulitzer-winning interactive,Snow Fall, demands considerable resources. Twenty-three people are credited for Firestorm, which was three months in the making — actually a speedy turnaround for a project of this scale.
Many newsrooms don’t have that level of resources, of course. But they can still learn from The Guardian’s process and the project’s experiments with layered storytelling — and figure out ways to do something similar on a smaller scale.
Keep reading for key takeaways from the project.

FJP: I’ve been hearing people favor this one to Snow Fall but perhaps that’s because the story itself (which is incredibly moving) lends itself to a slightly more poignant interactive than Snow Fall…but both are fantastic. —Jihii
Bonus: E-book version of the story, which you can buy here, along with other Guardian shorts.

Snow Fall, Meet Firestorm

If you haven’t checked it out yet—and I hope you have—The Guardian’s Firestorm, a Snow Fall-esque interactive long-form multimedia piece came out last month and it’s completely stunning.

From Poynter’s story on the teamwork required to put it together:

“I think you have to capture people’s hearts,” Francesca Panetta, special projects editor of interactive storytelling projects, said in a phone interview. “As with all kinds of storytelling, you can’t lose sight of that need to connect and touch people, whether it’s writing or radio or a complicated interactive.”

Firestorm is remarkable for a number of reasons, including the stellar video images and the subtle way that looping video is used behind the written story. The integration between words and video is handled with such finesse that the one doesn’t distract from the other.

“We’re very happy with the subtlety,” Panetta said.

The chapter navigation uses clear images and concise icons and labels, ensuring it’s always clear where you are in the story.

A project like Firestorm or The New York Times’ Pulitzer-winning interactive,Snow Fall, demands considerable resources. Twenty-three people are credited for Firestorm, which was three months in the making — actually a speedy turnaround for a project of this scale.

Many newsrooms don’t have that level of resources, of course. But they can still learn from The Guardian’s process and the project’s experiments with layered storytelling — and figure out ways to do something similar on a smaller scale.

Keep reading for key takeaways from the project.

FJP: I’ve been hearing people favor this one to Snow Fall but perhaps that’s because the story itself (which is incredibly moving) lends itself to a slightly more poignant interactive than Snow Fall…but both are fantastic. —Jihii

Bonus: E-book version of the story, which you can buy here, along with other Guardian shorts.

HTML5, Parallax and Storytelling
Yes, you should stop what you’re doing and explore how the New York Times put together this story on avalanches and skiing in Washington State.
Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek.

HTML5, Parallax and Storytelling

Yes, you should stop what you’re doing and explore how the New York Times put together this story on avalanches and skiing in Washington State.

Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek.

For Students: a New Multimedia Storytelling Competition
From the multimedia magazine the Atavist. Beginning January 1, 2013, students are invited to participate in the above competition by submitting a long-form, nonfiction story that isn’t just writing — the judges want to see photography, video, narration and illustrations. Whatever’s appropriate and fits into the Atavist’s editorial platform.
There are openings for high school, college and grad students. Enter here, and good luck.

For Students: a New Multimedia Storytelling Competition

From the multimedia magazine the Atavist. Beginning January 1, 2013, students are invited to participate in the above competition by submitting a long-form, nonfiction story that isn’t just writing — the judges want to see photography, video, narration and illustrations. Whatever’s appropriate and fits into the Atavist’s editorial platform.

There are openings for high school, college and grad students. Enter here, and good luck.

The Election as Graphic Novel
Just look at it.

The Election as Graphic Novel

Just look at it.

For those interested in multimedia journalism, which software/programs should we be familiarized with? I feel like there are a lot, and I want to get learning — Asked by Anonymous

I can answer but my biases proceed me since a) I’m on a Mac and b) we have partners who help us out. If I mention them I’ll acknowledge them below.

  • In General
    Adobe CS Something. We’re currently working with CS5, but CS6 is described as great. Mind you, this is a suite of tools that ranges from design and photography stalwart Photoshop to the video production capabilities of Premiere. In other words, Adobe is creating an all encompassing product line for our multimedia needs.
     
  • Video 
    Final Cut Pro. We’re on FCP X but have been frustrated by features we’ve lost since Final Cut 7 (long story). Fortunately, FCP X is adding these features with each new release.

    Something to look into: Adobe’s Premiere. When Apple reinvented Final Cut with its X series, many video producers were underwhelmed and fled to Adobe and have great things to say about it. If you get Adobe’s CS 5/6 you’ll have Premiere and can take it through its paces.
     
  • Audio 
    This comes in two flavors: when we create jingles, soundtracks and general audio design we use Propellerhead’s Reason and Ableton Live. We then mix these with Apple’s Logic Pro.

    Pro Tools
    is an obvious standard that’s used throughout the radio world but we’ve gone with Logic Pro because it fits easily within our overall workflow.
     
  • Screenshots and Screencasts:
    We go with two flavors here. For screenshots, Ambrosia Software’s SnapZPro. This let’s us take screenshots with dropshadows and other effects. It also lets us do basic screencasts.

    But if we’re doing longform, voiceover screencasts we opt for Telestream’s Screenflow which has a built in video editor and is specifically created for doing screencast tutorials. For example, it has callouts for where your cursor is, can zoom in, zoom out on screen details, etc. (Disclosure: Telestream is a FJP partner.)
     
  • Text Editors 
    These are underestimated until you actually code. We use Panic’s Coda but the more popular choice (for the Mac) is Macromates’ Textmate.
     
  • File Transfer
    Coda handles general file updates to our servers but we also use Panic’s Transmit for uploading/working within both our CDNs, Amazon and Highwinds (Disclosure: Highwinds is an FJP partner).

How to learn them all?
Start with each publisher’s site and then with general online searches. These will usually lead you back to communities on YouTube that provide tutorials.

If you can’t find what you’re looking for take out a subscription at Lynda.com. Lynda’s a learning community that provides screencast tutorials on both multimedia production and code development.

Better, the monthly subscription is inexpensive and your can cancel as soon as you’ve finished what you want to learn. For example, sign up for a month, learn a piece of software and then cancel until you need to learn something new again.

Anyway, that’s the biggie picture. Hope it helps. — Michael

Cuban Missile Crisis turns 50, becomes Interactive Documentary
The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library is commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis this week with an interactive documentary containing – besides a two-hour film – photos, letters, newspaper clippings, and speeches.
Called Clouds over Cuba, the film is divided into five sections with a corner icon containing all supplemental material. That icon, your ‘dossier’, slowly fills up with 187 items – memos to the president, speeches, pictures from the USSR, etc. – as they’re mentioned in the film.

The best feature: you can sync the documentary with iCal or Google Calendars and find much of that content spread out before you, according to the day and time of their importance. This can be very useful, as toggling between a movie and each dossier item as it unlocks becomes tiresome after a few minutes.

Cuban Missile Crisis turns 50, becomes Interactive Documentary

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library is commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis this week with an interactive documentary containing – besides a two-hour film – photos, letters, newspaper clippings, and speeches.

Called Clouds over Cuba, the film is divided into five sections with a corner icon containing all supplemental material. That icon, your ‘dossier’, slowly fills up with 187 items – memos to the president, speeches, pictures from the USSR, etc. – as they’re mentioned in the film.

The best feature: you can sync the documentary with iCal or Google Calendars and find much of that content spread out before you, according to the day and time of their importance. This can be very useful, as toggling between a movie and each dossier item as it unlocks becomes tiresome after a few minutes.

Gabriel Sama on Infinite Online Space

We sat down with Rest of the World Media founder and Stanford regular Gabriel Sama to talk about newsrooms, and how they should organize themselves and their content. Newspapers have only so much space, Sama told us, and you can only fill so much of it with news. But when newsrooms publish online, they face something very different — they’re dealing with infinity.

That’s not to say they should try to fill infinite space, Sama says. Journalists should focus on what’s important today — whether it’s an oil spill or an attack in Gaza, a journalist’s work shouldn’t necessarily be confined to their beat. He emphasizes the strength of teaming up with other journalists and bringing multimedia into the picture at the planning stage as a way to utilize the infinite space we’re given online to publish timely, meaningful content.

FJP: Gabriel’s not the only one thinking about cross-beat reporting.

Launching a Global Multimedia Platform
The Tiziano Project, an organization that provides community members in conflict, post-conflict, and underreported regions with media training to tell stories about their lives, has launched StoriesFrom. The platform is a gathering of international multimedia storytelling.
Via the Knight Foundation:

The platform allows individuals and organizations to easily create immersive documentary projects that combine the work of both community members and professional journalists and filmmakers. The resulting showcases display completed projects in beautiful and engaging online packages…
…StoriesFrom launched with projects from Iraq, Afghanistan, the West Bank and East Jerusalem, Latvia, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation.
It is currently accepting project ideas to be used for beta testing of the platform. If you would like to participate, please email: create@storiesfrom.

StoriesFrom was funded by a 2011 Knight Challenge Grant.
Image: Partial screenshot of StoriesFrom. 
Select to embiggen.

Launching a Global Multimedia Platform

The Tiziano Project, an organization that provides community members in conflict, post-conflict, and underreported regions with media training to tell stories about their lives, has launched StoriesFrom. The platform is a gathering of international multimedia storytelling.

Via the Knight Foundation:

The platform allows individuals and organizations to easily create immersive documentary projects that combine the work of both community members and professional journalists and filmmakers. The resulting showcases display completed projects in beautiful and engaging online packages…

…StoriesFrom launched with projects from Iraq, Afghanistan, the West Bank and East Jerusalem, Latvia, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation.

It is currently accepting project ideas to be used for beta testing of the platform. If you would like to participate, please email: create@storiesfrom.

StoriesFrom was funded by a 2011 Knight Challenge Grant.

Image: Partial screenshot of StoriesFrom

Select to embiggen.

Your Local Paper, In More Ways Than Ever
via Editor & Publisher:

A new marketing campaign from Pioneer Newspapers, Inc. is on a mission to send one very important message: Newspapers are alive and well. But you won’t find the message just in print. It’s being broadcast in television commercials, radio advertisements, and on billboards.“We’re trying to reach people who don’t read the paper,” said president and chief executive officer Mike Gugliotto.The Seattle-based family media business owns newspapers primarily in the Northwest…Their goal? To take a more proactive stand to dispel myths that the newspaper industry is dying.

Nine Pioneer newspapers are participating in the campaign, which will continue for one year and incorporate several themes.

The current theme focuses on the changing landscape of news delivery. One of the commercials shows a newsboy riding his bike through a neighborhood delivering the news, but it’s a laptop landing in homes. Another shows the family dog fetching the newspaper, only to come back with an iPad in his mouth.

And of course, multimedia is a big part of the campaign.

In addition, Pioneer has invested in new formats to deliver the news. The Chronicle equips reporters with “MoJo” kits that allow them to carry a laptop, digital camera, video, and audio recorders so they can bring readers breaking news and live blogs. The Tribune launched HTML5 websites for readers who prefer a tablet-based experience. Advertising representatives are also given tablets to take to meetings with clients to showcase online and mobile offerings.

FJP: A nice rebuttal to the all the talk on dying newspapers. 
Image: Cupcakes announce the slogan, “Your Local Paper in More Ways Than Ever.”

Your Local Paper, In More Ways Than Ever

via Editor & Publisher:

A new marketing campaign from Pioneer Newspapers, Inc. is on a mission to send one very important message: Newspapers are alive and well. But you won’t find the message just in print. It’s being broadcast in television commercials, radio advertisements, and on billboards.

“We’re trying to reach people who don’t read the paper,” said president and chief executive officer Mike Gugliotto.

The Seattle-based family media business owns newspapers primarily in the Northwest…Their goal? To take a more proactive stand to dispel myths that the newspaper industry is dying.

Nine Pioneer newspapers are participating in the campaign, which will continue for one year and incorporate several themes.

The current theme focuses on the changing landscape of news delivery. One of the commercials shows a newsboy riding his bike through a neighborhood delivering the news, but it’s a laptop landing in homes. Another shows the family dog fetching the newspaper, only to come back with an iPad in his mouth.

And of course, multimedia is a big part of the campaign.

In addition, Pioneer has invested in new formats to deliver the news. The Chronicle equips reporters with “MoJo” kits that allow them to carry a laptop, digital camera, video, and audio recorders so they can bring readers breaking news and live blogs. The Tribune launched HTML5 websites for readers who prefer a tablet-based experience. Advertising representatives are also given tablets to take to meetings with clients to showcase online and mobile offerings.

FJP: A nice rebuttal to the all the talk on dying newspapers. 

Image: Cupcakes announce the slogan, “Your Local Paper in More Ways Than Ever.”

Afrikaner Blood

Afrikaner Blood from Holland’s Elles van Gelderen and Ilvy Njiokiktjien has won the second annual World Press Photo Multimedia contest.

The documentary follows Afrikaner teenagers in South Africa as they attend a self-defense camp to learn how to defend themselves against the “black enemy.”

Via the British Journal of Photography:

Speaking to BJP ahead of the announcement, jury chair Vincent Laforet explains that the judges felt the winning work had “a squirm factor,” he says. “We were uncomfortable with the subject and what was being said. I, initially, had a negative reaction to it because I was so taken aback by, in effect, the power of the piece. But, when I saw it for the second time I realised that not only was it a very important piece, but also it was by far the single best produced piece in terms of nuance and restraint - they could absolutely have gone over the top, exaggerated things or make points a little bit more bluntly. Instead, there was a lot of subtlety. The piece was very well edited. It had a series of interviews prior to the indoctrination, and interviews after it.”

Run Time - 8:27



Four for One
Published on bob sacha ’s blog

Text? Sound? Multimedia? Broadcast TV? Which is the best medium to tell a story? In the last days two major US media outlets chose to feature a story about an obscure 82 year old jazz pianists from Buffalo, NY. Not exactly the usual subject for a national media feeding frenzy but interesting to compare the stories. Which worked well? What did each version leave out? How did each version start and finish?
Here’s the line up:
The story in print from the NYTimesThe story in multimedia, also from the NYTimesThe story on the radio from National Public Radio’s Weekend Edition
and finally, the same story on local Buffalo TV News.





I was lucky enough to have Bob Sacha as a substitute professor once (he brought us candy and opened our eyes to multimedia storytelling)  Please check out his blog. It’s a constant source of inspiration for me. 
P.S. I grew up in Buffalo, NY after I moved from Beijing. This story was kind of a big deal. 
-Chao @cli6cli6

Four for One
Published on bob sacha ’s blog

Text? Sound? Multimedia? Broadcast TV? Which is the best medium to tell a story? In the last days two major US media outlets chose to feature a story about an obscure 82 year old jazz pianists from Buffalo, NY. Not exactly the usual subject for a national media feeding frenzy but interesting to compare the stories. Which worked well? What did each version leave out? How did each version start and finish?

Here’s the line up:

The story in print from the NYTimes
The story in multimedia, also from the NYTimes
The story on the radio from National Public Radio’s Weekend Edition

and finally, the same story on local Buffalo TV News.

I was lucky enough to have Bob Sacha as a substitute professor once (he brought us candy and opened our eyes to multimedia storytelling)  Please check out his blog. It’s a constant source of inspiration for me. 

P.S. I grew up in Buffalo, NY after I moved from Beijing. This story was kind of a big deal. 

-Chao @cli6cli6

Top 50 multimedia packages of 2011
This is a great list of amazing multimedia storytelling projects in 2011. Check it out for inspiration. Congrats to my former professor Zach Wise for his part in Soul of Athens.
Journalistic Multimedia:
Portraits of grief — NYTimes.com
How does your income compare? — WashingtonPost.com
The debt crisis: What should Congress do? — NYTimes.com
A week on Foursquare — WSJ.com
The death of a terrorist: A turning point? — NYTimes.com
Arab spring: an interactive timeline of Middle East protests — Guardian.co.uk
Empty cradles — JSOnline.com
Victims of gang violence — LA Times
Japan earthquake — AP
Battles and casualties of the Civil War — WashingtonPost.com