posts about or somewhat related to ‘national geographic’

David Rees Goes Even Deeper

The same (former political cartoonist) David Rees who taught us how to properly sharpen a pencil has his own How-To show on National Geographic called Going Deep with David Rees, and the first season is now free to watch on Hulu

Rees is fun to watch because of his undying enthusiasm and curiosity for otherwise ordinary subject matter, but also because the show is educational and inspiring without trying to hard to be. And it’s refreshing to see someone in search of the simple yet rewarding things in life (see: How to Climb a Tree). I would say it might be the new show to contend with MythBusters, but it’s got an entirely different sense of humor and an original premise that lends itself to more and more great episodes. 

But seriously: Go watch this video first, and you’ll understand Rees pretty well. In case you’re still not convinced, he’s also good friends with the brilliant John Hodgman. —Mariana

Restful
Winners of the 2014 National Geographic Travelers Photography Contest were announced earlier this week.
Image: Merit Prize Winner, A Well Earned Rest, by Evan Cole, who writes, “This photo of Moussa Macher, our Tuareg guide, was taken at the summit of Tin-Merzouga, the largest dune (or erg) in the Tadrat region of the Sahara desert in southern Algeria. Moussa rested while waiting for us to finish our 45-minute struggle to the top.” Select to embiggen.

Restful

Winners of the 2014 National Geographic Travelers Photography Contest were announced earlier this week.

Image: Merit Prize Winner, A Well Earned Rest, by Evan Cole, who writes, “This photo of Moussa Macher, our Tuareg guide, was taken at the summit of Tin-Merzouga, the largest dune (or erg) in the Tadrat region of the Sahara desert in southern Algeria. Moussa rested while waiting for us to finish our 45-minute struggle to the top.” Select to embiggen.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas
National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.
But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.
Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.
Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas

National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.

But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.

Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.

Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.

A typographic map of the top 25 surnames in each US State, their frequency and their country of origin.

“What’s in a Surname? A new view of the United States based on the distribution of common last names shows centuries of history and echoes some of America’s great immigration sagas. To compile this data, geographers at University College London used phone directories to find the predominant surnames in each state. Software then identified the probable provenances of the 181 names that emerged.

An interactive version of the map is available on National Geographic (they’re running a printed version in the February magazine). Details behind the project are from Spatial Analysis.

A typographic map of the top 25 surnames in each US State, their frequency and their country of origin.

“What’s in a Surname? A new view of the United States based on the distribution of common last names shows centuries of history and echoes some of America’s great immigration sagas. To compile this data, geographers at University College London used phone directories to find the predominant surnames in each state. Software then identified the probable provenances of the 181 names that emerged.

An interactive version of the map is available on National Geographic (they’re running a printed version in the February magazine). Details behind the project are from Spatial Analysis.