posts about or somewhat related to ‘national post’

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence
Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.
Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence

Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.

Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.

Five newspapers, representing four countries, have been named the World’s Best-Designed Newspaper by the Society for News Design in its 33rd annual competition.
The winners: 

Excelsior, Mexíco City, Mexíco
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)
National Post, Toronto, ON, CanadaCir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)
Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Frankfurt am Main, GermanyCir. 175,000 & over (Non-Daily)
The Grid, Toronto, ON, CanadaCir. 25,000 – 74,000 – 74,999 (Non-Daily)
Politiken, Copenhagen, DenmarkCir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)


From the judges’ statement (via SND):


The formula for excellence will always be less about format and typography than about the unreserved commitment to the community of readers that newspapers serve and clarity about the nature and interests of those readers. What is a perfect look for an audience in Beijing or Oslo will not likely be perfect for an audience in Buenos Aires or Charlotte. A newspaper must find the voice that speaks clearly to its unique audience of readers, and the best newspapers will always do so.
That’s what all of these World’s Best newspapers share — a certainty about who their audiences are and a bold, sure-footed approach to reaching them. All have a unique voice. All are superb. All share a commitment to print that other newspapers should emulate. They never waste a page, never waste their readers’ time. These newspapers look healthy, well-staffed and richly resourced — even if they are not. It was inspiring to see international journalists who still believe in excellence in print.

Five newspapers, representing four countries, have been named the World’s Best-Designed Newspaper by the Society for News Design in its 33rd annual competition.

The winners: 

Excelsior, Mexíco City, Mexíco

Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

National Post, Toronto, ON, Canada
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Cir. 175,000 & over (Non-Daily)

The Grid, Toronto, ON, Canada
Cir. 25,000 – 74,000 – 74,999 (Non-Daily)

Politiken, Copenhagen, Denmark
Cir. 75,000 – 174-999 (Daily)

From the judges’ statement (via SND):

The formula for excellence will always be less about format and typography than about the unreserved commitment to the community of readers that newspapers serve and clarity about the nature and interests of those readers. What is a perfect look for an audience in Beijing or Oslo will not likely be perfect for an audience in Buenos Aires or Charlotte. A newspaper must find the voice that speaks clearly to its unique audience of readers, and the best newspapers will always do so.

That’s what all of these World’s Best newspapers share — a certainty about who their audiences are and a bold, sure-footed approach to reaching them. All have a unique voice. All are superb. All share a commitment to print that other newspapers should emulate. They never waste a page, never waste their readers’ time. These newspapers look healthy, well-staffed and richly resourced — even if they are not. It was inspiring to see international journalists who still believe in excellence in print.

Today, in Bad Ideas: A Tiered Press System →

Via National Post:

Quebec’s Culture Minister, Christine St.-Pierre, has floated the creation of “a new model of regulation of Quebec media.” At the heart of the project is legislation that would define the “status of professional journalists.” The stated intention is to distinguish those dedicated to “serving the public interest” from “amateur bloggers.” Those admitted to the rank of professional journalist would enjoy unspecified “advantages or privileges,” such as “better access to government sources.”

This project strikes us as alarming on many levels. Even though journalism schools exist, journalism itself is an unregulated profession, unlike, say, dentistry or law. And that is a good thing. The basic rules of reportage can be taught, but the ability to rapidly synthesize disparate pieces of information into an intelligible, easily digested whole is the fruit of individual talent, curiosity, insight and ambition coupled with on-the-job apprenticeship.

Not a single member of the National Post’s editorial board went to journalism school; we suspect the same is true of many major newspaper editorial boards in the country. Nor do we have any sort of government accreditation, because, thankfully, none is necessary. We migrated into writing because we were drawn to the craft - not by passing some test or official designation supplied by a trade group or agency.

And whatever Ms. St. Pierre may think, blogging is not a disreputable occupation: Many professional journalists today get into the highly competitive market by self-publishing on the Internet in one way or another. Amateur bloggers - “citizen journalists” - should be encouraged, not chilled.

Read through for the rest of National Post’s response… and then follow their Tumblr.