Posts tagged new media

Anthony De Rosa: Why Newsrooms Should Poach Tech and Startup Talent

Anthony De Rosa is Reuters’ Social Media Editor, where he’s also a columnist and host at ReutersTV. We sat down with him to discuss where the tech and news communities meet and, increasingly, overlap.

Being that the news industry has more than a few business problems these days, Anthony suggests hiring outside help. By choosing Craigslist, Groupon and Facebook as examples of places from which to steal employees, De Rosa makes a solid point: go where the success is, and learn from the people that have done smart things in the more turbulent and burgeoning media landscapes.

Anthony also discusses what news life is like at Reuters, which we’ll dive into in more detail over the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

And for more FJP videos, see our new site, theFJP.org.

When I got that journalism degree back in 1974 newspapers were heading toward near-monopoly status and network news divisions thought of themselves as public trusts more than businesses. For the individual editor and reporter, the profession was a calling and finding the scoop was all that mattered. Today’s students seem to be realists. They get that journalism is a business. They understand that the who, what, when, where and why of their careers is as much about an entrepreneurial, innovative spirit as it is about the story. Industry veterans, far too many still stuck in an old mindset, would do well to spend a little time in the classroom.

Lewis Dvorkin, Chief Products Officer at Forbes, visited my class at NYU earlier this week. He told us stories about start-ups and running Forbes online, and we asked him questions about everything. He’s summarized the Q&A here.

Very useful for young journalists. -Blake

theparisreview:

darienlibrary:

While interning at the American Library in Paris a few summers ago, I came across this issue of Library Journal from 1950. This is sweet, beautiful proof that we’ve been worried about new media making reading obsolete for oh … ever.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

There’s room for everything today - we’re raising a generation that will never know information to be a trickle or a trip to the library. Everything has its place. It just needs to be good enough to merit that spot.

theparisreview:

darienlibrary:

While interning at the American Library in Paris a few summers ago, I came across this issue of Library Journal from 1950. This is sweet, beautiful proof that we’ve been worried about new media making reading obsolete for oh … ever.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

There’s room for everything today - we’re raising a generation that will never know information to be a trickle or a trip to the library. Everything has its place. It just needs to be good enough to merit that spot.

Teaching Entrepreneurial Journalism

Thinking about j-school? This video is a good example of what the more progressive programs are beginning to teach.

Here, CUNY Professor CW Anderson tells us about his Entrepreneurial Journalism course, where his students study new (and theoretical) business models, meet industry people, and then pitch then their own “journalism business.” The first class was a mixed bunch, he told us, just like any handful of people would be — some were excited by the challenge, others found it off-putting. But almost all of them, he said, had to grapple with the realization that getting a job at a daily might not be the best out-of-college move anymore.

For more from Chris, see these FJP videos and look for his book, Networking the News: The Struggle to Rebuild Metropolitan Journalism, 1997-2011 later this year from Temple University Press.

CW Anderson on new ways of reporting (hint: cite gadflies)

In this video, CUNY Professor CW Anderson tells us why reporters need to change the way they see themselves and their work. In the past, he says, reporting was a fairly routine job — you knew who knew what, and you were the one who broke the story. But anyone working in a newsroom today, he says, has to consider the gadflies. We’ll upload more videos on this topic and others from our talk with Chris over the next few days.

CW Anderson is an Assistant Professor of Media Culture at CUNY, where he teaches Entrepreneurial Journalism and covers topics such as journalism’s place in culture and changing definitions of the “audience.” He regularly blogs for Nieman Lab and The Atlantic, and his book Networking the News: The Struggle to Rebuild Metropolitan Journalism, 1997-2011 will be released later this year by Temple University Press.

The Center for Investigative Reporting makes color book journalism for kids
There’s been a lot of talk lately about making journalism for different groups of people. Or at least that’s what I overhear. And that’s just what California Watch, a project of CIR, is doing:

It all started with an off-the-wall idea in an editorial meeting. While California Watch articles are written for adults, we recognize that oftentimes children are those most affected by the stories we report.
That’s exactly the case when it comes to our series on seismic safety oversight in the state’s K–12 schools. Thousands of children attend class each day in buildings or schools that have not received final safety certifications from the state’s chief building regulator. Some schools are located close to fault lines or within liquefaction zones.

The article talks a lot about the need for peripheral-reporting, or aiming stories at groups who aren’t, for whatever reason, reading or listening:

One Chinese school director called the books “urgently needed”; a Vietnamese reader said this would be the first time her mother had access to preparedness materials in a language she could understand.

The coloring book is the furthest along of a few ideas that CIR is working on. Another, due to launch this summer, is a YouTube channel that will curate investigative reporting video from the professional journalism world and, very importantly, the unnoticed-but-deserving clan of people who do it but aren’t “professional” yet.

The Center for Investigative Reporting makes color book journalism for kids

There’s been a lot of talk lately about making journalism for different groups of people. Or at least that’s what I overhear. And that’s just what California Watch, a project of CIR, is doing:

It all started with an off-the-wall idea in an editorial meeting. While California Watch articles are written for adults, we recognize that oftentimes children are those most affected by the stories we report.

That’s exactly the case when it comes to our series on seismic safety oversight in the state’s K–12 schools. Thousands of children attend class each day in buildings or schools that have not received final safety certifications from the state’s chief building regulator. Some schools are located close to fault lines or within liquefaction zones.

The article talks a lot about the need for peripheral-reporting, or aiming stories at groups who aren’t, for whatever reason, reading or listening:

One Chinese school director called the books “urgently needed”; a Vietnamese reader said this would be the first time her mother had access to preparedness materials in a language she could understand.

The coloring book is the furthest along of a few ideas that CIR is working on. Another, due to launch this summer, is a YouTube channel that will curate investigative reporting video from the professional journalism world and, very importantly, the unnoticed-but-deserving clan of people who do it but aren’t “professional” yet.

The death of the newsweek.com URL marks the official end of what was once a fully staffed and hugely trafficked site in its own right.

According to this article in New York Magazine, on July 19th the Newsweek URL will no longer exist. instead, all users will be redirected to the Daily Beast, its sister site.

Are there distinguishable factors that led to the demise of Newsweek or is it just one of many publications to submit to the pressures of new media?

Innovative Move? BBC Develops iPhone App for Field Reporters
The BBC is in the process of creating a new app that would allow its reporters in the field to file photos, audio and video from an iPhone or iPad directly into the news organization’s system. The app would also allow reporters to broadcast live from an iPhone using only a 3G signal, Journalism.co.uk reported earlier today. But is this an innovative move?
Original article by Journalism.co.uk and picture from Media Bistro

Innovative Move? BBC Develops iPhone App for Field Reporters

The BBC is in the process of creating a new app that would allow its reporters in the field to file photos, audio and video from an iPhone or iPad directly into the news organization’s system. The app would also allow reporters to broadcast live from an iPhone using only a 3G signal, Journalism.co.uk reported earlier today. But is this an innovative move?

Original article by Journalism.co.uk and picture from Media Bistro

Esquire Seeks Style-Conscious Web Editor

Are you ready for a new media job? 

Adventures in Freelancing

In which our hero must find women who trade their children for luxury Hermes hand bags.

Writer: “Three years ago I would have gotten $4,000 for a story that took this much work.”

Editor: “That was the old media.”