Posts tagged with ‘newspapers’

St. Louis Dispatch
Its coverage can be read here.
Related, via Poynter — How St. Louis’ Alt-Weekly is Covering Ferguson:

The episode has exhausted the reporters, many of whom worked long hours with little sleep in between. Lindsay Toler, a news blogger, was halfway through a bottle of Busch at a cash-only dive bar on Sunday when she saw TV reports of the chaos in Ferguson. She left without saying a word to her friends and spent the rest of the night monitoring the story on Twitter. She estimates she has worked several 12-hour days since then, with about five hours of sleep daily. Lussenhop said she and her fellow journalists are running on about three to five hours of sleep most days. Garrison tried to convince his reporters to take a break, but they resisted. On Thursday, he edited a story from an wiped-out reporter who spelled “Ferguson” four different ways…
…Because of the scope of the story, the paper has devoted most of its small editorial staff to covering Ferguson. Of the 39 stories published on the paper’s news blog last week, 34 of them were about the suburb. The other five were written before the shooting. 

Image: Detail, front page, St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

St. Louis Dispatch

Its coverage can be read here.

Related, via PoynterHow St. Louis’ Alt-Weekly is Covering Ferguson:

The episode has exhausted the reporters, many of whom worked long hours with little sleep in between. Lindsay Toler, a news blogger, was halfway through a bottle of Busch at a cash-only dive bar on Sunday when she saw TV reports of the chaos in Ferguson. She left without saying a word to her friends and spent the rest of the night monitoring the story on Twitter. She estimates she has worked several 12-hour days since then, with about five hours of sleep daily. Lussenhop said she and her fellow journalists are running on about three to five hours of sleep most days. Garrison tried to convince his reporters to take a break, but they resisted. On Thursday, he edited a story from an wiped-out reporter who spelled “Ferguson” four different ways…

…Because of the scope of the story, the paper has devoted most of its small editorial staff to covering Ferguson. Of the 39 stories published on the paper’s news blog last week, 34 of them were about the suburb. The other five were written before the shooting. 

Image: Detail, front page, St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

In the last decade, newspapers’ weekday circulation has fallen 47 percent, ads have fallen 55 percent, and about seven in ten newspaper readers are now older than 45. Stats like these provide the background music to events of the last few months, when News Corp, Time Warner, Gannett, the Tribune Company, and E. W. Scripps all unloaded their journalism divisions. Including the Washington Post’s sale within the last 12 months, this means that seven of the ten largest newspapers in the country have been dumped in an annus horribilis for print.

A Terrible Year for Newspapers, a Good Year for News - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

FJP: Horrendum X Annos. But, yes, also an amazing age for news.

(via infoneer-pulse)

Business News, August 2014 Edition
Buzzfeed, which gets about 150 million of us to visit each month, just closed a $50 million round with Andreessen Horowitz, the prominent technology venture firm.
Chris Dixon, general partner at the VC firm, says Buzzfeed is a “full stack" startup, meaning that it’s not just an online publisher, but rather an online publisher with integrated end-to-end technologies.
In this case, a media stack on which listicles and in-depth reporting can co-exist side by side, driven by a modern content management system, integrated analytics and ad serving engines, and a 75 person team creating “native content” for advertisers. It’s repetitive to say Buzzfeed also gets the social thing. About 75% of Buzzfeed’s traffic comes from social media.
What, fundamentally, makes this an interesting investment to Dixon? A mastery of social, mobile, content and tech:

Many of today’s great media companies were built on top of emerging technologies. Examples include Time Inc. which was built on color printing, CBS which was built on radio, and Viacom which was built on cable TV. We’re presently in the midst of a major technological shift in which, increasingly, news and entertainment are being distributed on social networks and consumed on mobile devices. We believe BuzzFeed will emerge from this period as a preeminent media company.

Meantime, legacy media companies are dropping their print publications. “Divestiture" is the name of the 2014 game. Three companies built on print — Ganett, the Tribune Company, and EW Scripps — are focusing on television, radio and the Internet, and spinning off their print properties to survive as independent companies that sink or swim as the tides may turn.
Says The New York Times’ David Carr:

The persistent financial demands of Wall Street have trumped the informational needs of Main Street. For decades, investors wanted newspaper companies to become bigger and diversify, so they bought more newspapers and developed television divisions. Now print is too much of a drag on earnings, so media companies are dividing back up and print is being kicked to the curb.

The news behind the news, of course, is that already reeling smaller, regional papers will increasingly vanish without the financial buffer provided by being part of larger diversified companies. This, despite the fact that 72% of Americans follow local news via these same print publications. Then again, many outside the news media bubble don’t know about the financial disruption that’s churned the industry over the last decade.
Via last year’s Pew State of the Media Report:

[T]he majority of people surveyed early this year had heard little or nothing about the financial problems besetting news organizations. The largest group of respondents—36%—said they heard “nothing at all” about the issue and the second largest—24%—said they heard “a little.”

So where goes print?
As news of the $50 million Buzzfeed round pinged about the Internet, a quieter profile of Harper’s publisher John MacArthur hit the Web. In it, he doubles down on print:

The web is bad for writers, [MacArthur] said, who are too exhausted by the pace of an endless news cycle to write poised, reflective stories and who are paid peanuts if they do. It’s bad for publishers, who have lost advertising revenue to Google and Facebook and will never make enough from a free model to sustain great writing. And it’s bad for readers, who cannot absorb information well on devices that buzz, flash and generally distract.
He does not want to explore many of the new revenue streams favored by other publishers — like Monocle, which has stores and a radio station. He will not let advertisers sponsor a section of the magazine, let alone place native ads, for fear that it will look as if they own Harper’s. He does not want conferences or to make videos. “A magazine should be a magazine,” he said. “A newspaper should be a newspaper.”

Harper’s, like other general interest literary magazines, consistently loses money. Then again, as a nonprofit backed by the MacArthur foundation and its $5.7 billion endowment, it’s not going away anytime soon.
For the rest: the forecast reads rocky times ahead.
Image: Old Carissa shipwrecked off the coast of Oregon, via Erin Misserion on Flickr. Select to embiggen.

Business News, August 2014 Edition

Buzzfeed, which gets about 150 million of us to visit each month, just closed a $50 million round with Andreessen Horowitz, the prominent technology venture firm.

Chris Dixon, general partner at the VC firm, says Buzzfeed is a “full stack" startup, meaning that it’s not just an online publisher, but rather an online publisher with integrated end-to-end technologies.

In this case, a media stack on which listicles and in-depth reporting can co-exist side by side, driven by a modern content management system, integrated analytics and ad serving engines, and a 75 person team creating “native content” for advertisers. It’s repetitive to say Buzzfeed also gets the social thing. About 75% of Buzzfeed’s traffic comes from social media.

What, fundamentally, makes this an interesting investment to Dixon? A mastery of social, mobile, content and tech:

Many of today’s great media companies were built on top of emerging technologies. Examples include Time Inc. which was built on color printing, CBS which was built on radio, and Viacom which was built on cable TV. We’re presently in the midst of a major technological shift in which, increasingly, news and entertainment are being distributed on social networks and consumed on mobile devices. We believe BuzzFeed will emerge from this period as a preeminent media company.

Meantime, legacy media companies are dropping their print publications. “Divestiture" is the name of the 2014 game. Three companies built on print — Ganett, the Tribune Company, and EW Scripps — are focusing on television, radio and the Internet, and spinning off their print properties to survive as independent companies that sink or swim as the tides may turn.

Says The New York Times’ David Carr:

The persistent financial demands of Wall Street have trumped the informational needs of Main Street. For decades, investors wanted newspaper companies to become bigger and diversify, so they bought more newspapers and developed television divisions. Now print is too much of a drag on earnings, so media companies are dividing back up and print is being kicked to the curb.

The news behind the news, of course, is that already reeling smaller, regional papers will increasingly vanish without the financial buffer provided by being part of larger diversified companies. This, despite the fact that 72% of Americans follow local news via these same print publications. Then again, many outside the news media bubble don’t know about the financial disruption that’s churned the industry over the last decade.

Via last year’s Pew State of the Media Report:

[T]he majority of people surveyed early this year had heard little or nothing about the financial problems besetting news organizations. The largest group of respondents—36%—said they heard “nothing at all” about the issue and the second largest—24%—said they heard “a little.”

So where goes print?

As news of the $50 million Buzzfeed round pinged about the Internet, a quieter profile of Harper’s publisher John MacArthur hit the Web. In it, he doubles down on print:

The web is bad for writers, [MacArthur] said, who are too exhausted by the pace of an endless news cycle to write poised, reflective stories and who are paid peanuts if they do. It’s bad for publishers, who have lost advertising revenue to Google and Facebook and will never make enough from a free model to sustain great writing. And it’s bad for readers, who cannot absorb information well on devices that buzz, flash and generally distract.

He does not want to explore many of the new revenue streams favored by other publishers — like Monocle, which has stores and a radio station. He will not let advertisers sponsor a section of the magazine, let alone place native ads, for fear that it will look as if they own Harper’s. He does not want conferences or to make videos. “A magazine should be a magazine,” he said. “A newspaper should be a newspaper.”

Harper’s, like other general interest literary magazines, consistently loses money. Then again, as a nonprofit backed by the MacArthur foundation and its $5.7 billion endowment, it’s not going away anytime soon.

For the rest: the forecast reads rocky times ahead.

Image: Old Carissa shipwrecked off the coast of Oregon, via Erin Misserion on Flickr. Select to embiggen.

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen
From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar. 
Via Charles Apple.

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen

From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar

Via Charles Apple.

1918 - 2013
Images: Selected newspaper front pages from around the world, via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

1918 - 2013

Images: Selected newspaper front pages from around the world, via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

Crooning about Newspapers

Before coming across this New Yorker list, I couldn’t name you one song about newspapers. Turns out, they inspired quite a few tunes. Above is “They Spelled My Name Wrong Again” by Loudon Wainwright III. Check out all 10 here.—Kat

Video: Youtube, Loudon Wainwright III’s T.S.M.N.W.A.

[Was hard] news ever commercial?

Gerald J. Baldasty’s book, The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century, makes a case clear as spring water that hard news has almost never been a mass commercial enterprise.

The American newspapers of the 1820s and early 1830s were creatures of political parties, edited by zealots. Essentially propaganda sheets, these newspapers were “devoted to winning elections,” as Baldasty wrote… Without newspapers, top political organizer Martin Van Buren once said, “we might as well hang our harps on willows.”

Political parties supported the papers financially, and when editors strayed from the party line into independence, the parties would dump their newspapers.

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV
Via Mashable: 

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV

Via Mashable

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

Be it Remembered!
Slate digs up this front page from Philadelphia’s Freeman’s Journal announcing the British “furrendered” in Yorktown, Virginia.
While the Treaty of Paris wasn’t signed for another two years, the October 1781 battle was the end of major hostilities in the Revolutionary War.
Design Notes, via Slate:

As Mariam Touba, a reference librarian at the New-York Historical Society, writes, in Colonial papers big news was often relegated to inside pages. A browse through the volume Reporting the Revolutionary War, which collects pages from Colonial and British newspapers’ coverage of the war’s major events, reveals that it was quite uncommon for newspapers to use type that would yield print bigger than a cramped 8-point font. Somebody at the Freeman’s Journal must have correctly judged this news to be worthy of uncommon typographical enthusiasm.

Image: Freeman’s Journal, October 24, 1781, via Slate. Select to embiggen.

Be it Remembered!

Slate digs up this front page from Philadelphia’s Freeman’s Journal announcing the British “furrendered” in Yorktown, Virginia.

While the Treaty of Paris wasn’t signed for another two years, the October 1781 battle was the end of major hostilities in the Revolutionary War.

Design Notes, via Slate:

As Mariam Touba, a reference librarian at the New-York Historical Society, writes, in Colonial papers big news was often relegated to inside pages. A browse through the volume Reporting the Revolutionary War, which collects pages from Colonial and British newspapers’ coverage of the war’s major events, reveals that it was quite uncommon for newspapers to use type that would yield print bigger than a cramped 8-point font. Somebody at the Freeman’s Journal must have correctly judged this news to be worthy of uncommon typographical enthusiasm.

Image: Freeman’s Journal, October 24, 1781, via Slate. Select to embiggen.

What does an iPhone-ified newspaper look like?

Back in May, The Chicago Sun-Times fired its entire photo staff (including Pulitzer Prize winner John White) in favor of training its reporters in the art of iPhone photography. The blog SunTimes/DarkTimes has been closely following the paper’s transition, collecting images on its front pages and website.

In a similar vein, former Sun-Times staff photographer Rob Hart started his iPhone-driven blog as a way to chronicle his life after being laid-off. In an interview with Chicagoist, Hart gave his opinion on the paper’s decision:

"Look, an iPhone can be used to take amazing photographs. But not every owner of an iPhone has the ability to capture a moment and tell a story with pictures the way a photojournalist can…I don’t think (reporters shooting pictures with iPhones) will succeed…Everything is done on the cheap. I don’t think anything they do has a chance of succeeding."

comment on SunTimes/DarkTimes lamented the iPhone-ified paper:

The quality in images is like night and day. Truly saddening to see some of the best talent discarded over some dollars and cents.

FJP: The aesthetic quality isn’t the only thing the Sun-Times put at stake. A strong photograph doesn’t just merely accompany an article or fill up space on a website. Photojournalists in the past have shown us that photos can enhance a story and even tell the tale on their own. I hope the Sun-Times does not lose sight of that. —Kat

Images: Screenshots of newspapers curated by SunTimes/DarkTimes blog.

Prison Times
Handwritten newspaper created by Confederate soldiers imprisoned at Fort Delaware in 1865.
Extra, Extra? Read all about it, via Slate.

Prison Times

Handwritten newspaper created by Confederate soldiers imprisoned at Fort Delaware in 1865.

Extra, Extra? Read all about it, via Slate.

The New York Times reports this week that only 1 in 8 of New York’s public high schools has a student newspaper — and many of those are published just a few times a year. A few more are online, which can leave out poorer schools.

The national figures are a little higher. But as Rebecca Dwarka, an 18-year-old senior in the Bronx who works for her student paper, The Dewitt Clinton News, told the Times, “Facebook is the new way of finding out what happened. Nobody wants to actually sit down and read a whole article about it,” which makes a “whole article” sound a little like a long sentence in solitary confinement.

Scott Simon, High School Newspapers: An Endangered Species, NPR.

FJP: And then there are things like Rhode Island’s 2011 anti-bullying law, which banned the use of social networks on school grounds. Here’s the Xtranormal take (video: 3 min 13 sec) on what high school journalism classrooms would look like without Facebook.

A trade group says that newspapers like the New York Times have seen large increases in circulation, but that’s partly because they are allowed to count their readers multiple times. The industry needs to do better. →

Via paidContent:

The latest circulation gains for the NYT and others came courtesy of the Alliance for Audited Media (formerly known as the Audit Bureau of Circulations), an industry group composed of advertising agencies and publishers. The group noted that the numbers are not really comparable to the previous year’s results for a number of reasons, including the fact that some newspapers have launched new subscription formats, stopped printing every day and so on.

As Edmund Lee at Bloomberg points out, the AAM survey — which is somewhat ironically locked behind a paywall — also allows publishers to count their readers multiple times, according to rules adopted recently by the group. In other words, newspapers can count someone who reads the newspaper in print, on the web and on their Kindle as three separate readers. But doesn’t this inflate their readership numbers unreasonably? It sure does. The bottom line is that no one really knows what the “real” readership numbers are for newspapers.

Some argue this has always been the case with newspapers, which is true: publishers have routinely engaged in all kinds of shady tricks to boost their circulation — including special discounts for bulk purchases by hotels and airlines and other giveaways, and even dumping large quantities into ravines or pulping them after printing. On top of that, many papers have inflated their readership numbers for years by claiming that each copy gets read by as many as five people, an estimate that borders on the ridiculous.

First Love
Came across this image via The Paris Review’s Notes from a Bookshop (by Kelly McMasters), which is quite literally about just that, and quite lovely so you should check it out. But I was reminded how much I love this poem by Sharon Olds so I had to find and share the entire thing.—Jihii
First Love, by Sharon Olds via The American Poetry Review: 

It was Sunday morning, I had the New York
Times spread out on my dormitory floor, its
black print coming off dark silver on the
heels of my palms, it was Spring and I had the
dormer window of my room open, to
let it in, I even had the radio 
on, I was letting it all in, the
tiny silvery radio voices—I
even let myself feel that it was EAster, the
dark flower of his life opening
again, his life being given back
again, I was in love and could take it, the ink
staining my hands, the news on the radio
coming in my ears, there had been a wreck
and they said your name, son of the well-known they
said your name. Then they said where they’d
taken the wounded and the dead, and I called the
hospital, I remember kneeling by the
phone on the third-floor landing of the dorm, the
dark steep stairs down
next to me, I spoke to a young
man a young doctor there in the
Emergency Room, my open ear
pressed to the dark receiver, my open
life pressed to the world, I said
Which one of them died, and he said your name,
he was standing there in the room with you
saying your name.
 I remember I leaned my
forehead against the varnished bars of the
baluster rails and held on,
pulling at the rails as if I wanted to
pull them together, shut them like a dark
door, close myself like a door
as you had been shut, closed off, but I could not
do it, the pain kept coursing through me like
life, like the gift of life.

Image & H/T: The Paris Review Tumblr

First Love

Came across this image via The Paris Review’s Notes from a Bookshop (by Kelly McMasters), which is quite literally about just that, and quite lovely so you should check it out. But I was reminded how much I love this poem by Sharon Olds so I had to find and share the entire thing.—Jihii

First Love, by Sharon Olds via The American Poetry Review: 

It was Sunday morning, I had the New York

Times spread out on my dormitory floor, its

black print coming off dark silver on the

heels of my palms, it was Spring and I had the

dormer window of my room open, to

let it in, I even had the radio 

on, I was letting it all in, the

tiny silvery radio voices—I

even let myself feel that it was EAster, the

dark flower of his life opening

again, his life being given back

again, I was in love and could take it, the ink

staining my hands, the news on the radio

coming in my ears, there had been a wreck

and they said your name, son of the well-known they

said your name. Then they said where they’d

taken the wounded and the dead, and I called the

hospital, I remember kneeling by the

phone on the third-floor landing of the dorm, the

dark steep stairs down

next to me, I spoke to a young

man a young doctor there in the

Emergency Room, my open ear

pressed to the dark receiver, my open

life pressed to the world, I said

Which one of them died, and he said your name,

he was standing there in the room with you

saying your name.

I remember I leaned my

forehead against the varnished bars of the

baluster rails and held on,

pulling at the rails as if I wanted to

pull them together, shut them like a dark

door, close myself like a door

as you had been shut, closed off, but I could not

do it, the pain kept coursing through me like

life, like the gift of life.

Image & H/T: The Paris Review Tumblr