Posts tagged with ‘newspapers’

The Stressful Careers of Photojournalists and Newspaper Reporters
Using metrics such as career opportunity, compensation, deadlines, working in the public eye, and danger among others to generate an overall “stress score”, CareerCast has a top ten list of the most stressful jobs of 2013.
Congratulations, photojournalists and newspaper reporters, you’ve cracked the list.
Reiterating what we already know, CareerCast reports:

Two careers in the media industry score highly on the stress scale: photojournalist and newspaper reporter. Professionals from each field can be thrown into the epicenter of dangerous situations, such as war, natural disasters and police chases. Both careers also have declining job opportunities as the 21st century media landscape evolves. Newspaper reporters in particular face a shrinking job market; the BLS estimates a 6% job decline in the industry by 2020.
The growth of online media has transformed the newspaper reporter’s job immensely. The immediacy internet outlets provide can be a useful tool, but it can also be a huge trap. Striving for the fastest reports can lead to inaccuracy and heightened stress. Watchful public eyes are trained on reporters at all times, so an incorrect report can compromise a reporter’s reputation as quickly as they can send a tweet.

The least stressful job for 2013? University professor.
Image: Stressful Careers. Select to embiggen.

The Stressful Careers of Photojournalists and Newspaper Reporters

Using metrics such as career opportunity, compensation, deadlines, working in the public eye, and danger among others to generate an overall “stress score”, CareerCast has a top ten list of the most stressful jobs of 2013.

Congratulations, photojournalists and newspaper reporters, you’ve cracked the list.

Reiterating what we already know, CareerCast reports:

Two careers in the media industry score highly on the stress scale: photojournalist and newspaper reporter. Professionals from each field can be thrown into the epicenter of dangerous situations, such as war, natural disasters and police chases. Both careers also have declining job opportunities as the 21st century media landscape evolves. Newspaper reporters in particular face a shrinking job market; the BLS estimates a 6% job decline in the industry by 2020.

The growth of online media has transformed the newspaper reporter’s job immensely. The immediacy internet outlets provide can be a useful tool, but it can also be a huge trap. Striving for the fastest reports can lead to inaccuracy and heightened stress. Watchful public eyes are trained on reporters at all times, so an incorrect report can compromise a reporter’s reputation as quickly as they can send a tweet.

The least stressful job for 2013? University professor.

Image: Stressful Careers. Select to embiggen.

How We Read our Newspapers
fotojournalismus:

A man reads a newspaper inside a dilapidated baby’s crib along a street in downtown Manila, Philippines on April 10, 2013.
[Credit : Aaron Favila/AP]

FJP: I personally spread it out over the kitchen table but this works. — Michael

How We Read our Newspapers

fotojournalismus:

A man reads a newspaper inside a dilapidated baby’s crib along a street in downtown Manila, Philippines on April 10, 2013.

[Credit : Aaron Favila/AP]

FJP: I personally spread it out over the kitchen table but this works. — Michael

Newspaper Advertising
bostonreview:

Why the Washington Post and other newspapers need pay walls. (Via The Atlantic)

FJP: Interesting to see since we we were just having a conversation about it.

Newspaper Advertising

bostonreview:

Why the Washington Post and other newspapers need pay walls. (Via The Atlantic)

FJP: Interesting to see since we we were just having a conversation about it.

As an entrepreneurial company with 60,000 employees around the world, we are constantly exploring profitable opportunities in many industries and sectors. So, it is natural that our name would come up in connection with this rumor. We respect the independence of the journalistic institutions referenced in today’s news stories, but it is our long-standing policy not to comment on deals or rumors of deals we may or may not be exploring.

Missy Cohlmia, spokeswoman for Koch Companies Public Sector, in a statement to the Hollywood Reporter on rumors that the Koch brothers are seeking to buy the Tribune Company’s newspapers. These include the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun and the Los Angeles Times. Hollywood Reporter, Koch Brothers Mulling LA Times Bid.

The Kochs own Koch Industries, the second largest privately held company in America, founded Americans for Prosperity in 2010 and spent $40 million on a successful drive to help Republicans regain congress, and then spent millions more this last election cycle on supporting Tea Party and Republican candidates.

For better background, see LA Weekly, which calls the rumor “a doozy wrapped in a bombshell exploding inside a Drudge siren.”

Blah Blah Blah
shortformblog:

Have to admit, this is a really fresh take on the op-ed headline. Really honest about the contents of the piece. (ht Charles Apple)

Blah Blah Blah

shortformblog:

Have to admit, this is a really fresh take on the op-ed headline. Really honest about the contents of the piece. (ht Charles Apple)

Today’s Front Pages From the Americas

New York Post (bottom center) still keeping it classy.

Images: Via the Newseum. Select to embiggen.

Using the Newspaper as a Textbook
Newspaper in Education Week is an annual celebration of the newspaper as a classroom resource. This year, the American Press Institute has partnered with the Newseum to create a free downloadable curriculum for middle school and high school students (there are extension activities for elementary school students) featuring six lessons aligned with Common Core State Standards. 
Lessons are as follows:

Newspapers in Your Life
What’s News Where?
The First Rough Draft of History
In the Newsroom
The Fairness Formula
Planning for the Unpredictable
Media Literacy
Where News Comes From
Evaluating the News

Somewhat Related: I recently encountered TuvaLabs, a startup that creates math classroom content using news and current events. A fantastic concept.—Jihii
Image: via emissourian.

Using the Newspaper as a Textbook

Newspaper in Education Week is an annual celebration of the newspaper as a classroom resource. This year, the American Press Institute has partnered with the Newseum to create a free downloadable curriculum for middle school and high school students (there are extension activities for elementary school students) featuring six lessons aligned with Common Core State Standards

Lessons are as follows:

Newspapers in Your Life

  • What’s News Where?
  • The First Rough Draft of History

In the Newsroom

  • The Fairness Formula
  • Planning for the Unpredictable

Media Literacy

  • Where News Comes From
  • Evaluating the News

Somewhat Related: I recently encountered TuvaLabs, a startup that creates math classroom content using news and current events. A fantastic concept.—Jihii

Image: via emissourian.

Read a Newspaper. Save the Puppies. →

Via Time:

While digital publishing has helped put old-fashioned newspapers into a tailspin, it’s also prompted a crisis at another venerable establishment—San Francisco’s animal control agency.

For years, the agency has been relying on the once abundant supply of old newspapers to line the cages of shelter puppies. But with many subscriptions now moving to digital, that vital supply of puppy paper has been decimated, reports CBS San Francisco.

The San Francisco Public Library is saving the day so far by donating its used papers.  

I guarantee you that the routine beat reporting of that newspaper every day produces at least a half-dozen stories that would be less interesting to the community than a half-dozen or more stories they could have done about the community events that showed support for the Devlin family. The Devlins’ health struggles have been a community story, with Scouts and schools and workplaces rallying for support in a variety of ways that were as important as the meeting stories their newspaper was covering and more interesting.

Steve Buttry, What new beats would help newsrooms cover local news better?

Buttry is referring to the death of his 16-year-old nephew, Patrick Devlin, which was never covered by the newspaper covering his metro area, except for an obituary. Devlin had been working on an Eagle Scout project at the time of his death. His sister, also seriously ill, was sent on a trip by the Make-A-Wish foundation, all of which are stories that the community would have cared about. 

FJP: Worth reading to consider what stories do and don’t matter to a community and how meaningful and efficient coverage can be achieved.

digg:

A Connecticut newspaper ran an ad for a gun show next to a story about Sandy Hook today.

FJP: In December we noted a gun ad on the Miami Herald’s home page. At least in that case you could chalk it up to an unfortunate case of contextual advertising algorithms doing their thing.
Here, not at all. Just plain mailing it in.

digg:

A Connecticut newspaper ran an ad for a gun show next to a story about Sandy Hook today.

FJP: In December we noted a gun ad on the Miami Herald’s home page. At least in that case you could chalk it up to an unfortunate case of contextual advertising algorithms doing their thing.

Here, not at all. Just plain mailing it in.

journojunction:

Have a very merry paywall Christmas!

FJP: When newspapers answer your question.

journojunction:

Have a very merry paywall Christmas!

FJP: When newspapers answer your question.

Twelve Egyptian newspapers Tuesday refused to publish and five TV stations have suspended their broadcasts in protest of the new Islamist-drawn constitution, as tens of thousands prepare for an anti-Mursi rally outside the presidential palace. The self-imposed media blackout comes one day after several Egyptian newspapers, including Al Watan and Al-Masry Al-Youm, carried a front page image showing the silhouette of a reporter in shackles behind bars under the headline: ‘A constitution that cancels rights and shackles freedoms. No to dictatorship.’

Egypt’s media on strike ahead of anti-Mursi rally | Al Akhbar English (via theamericanbear)

Background (via CNN):

Newspapers and television stations known for criticizing President Mohamed Morsy are falling silent Tuesday and Wednesday to protest the country’s new draft constitution and an edict the head of state issued nearly two weeks ago to expand his powers.

As Egyptians count down to a public referendum on the draft constitution to be held in less than two weeks, some newspapers disappeared from news stands Tuesday. Others printed the same protest picture of the press symbolically behind bars with the headline, “No to Dictatorship.”

Article 48 of the draft constitution ties media freedom to the framework of society and national security, which many Egyptian journalists see as vague terminology.

More: See here for a Q&A on what’s driving Egypt’s unrest.

(via theamericanbear)

A year ago today I walked out of the News & Record for the last time as editor. Twenty-seven years there, 13 of them as editor. It was a good run. But I wish I had been smarter. After a year as a civilian newspaper reader, I realize how often I worked on the wrong things.

John L. Robinson in Journalism, One Year Later. He reflects very honestly on what he could have done differently at the newspaper. 

The highlights: 

1. On Content

We spent time and precious resources on stories that didn’t matter much to most readers. We should have been writing stories that compelled people to read them. We didn’t do enough investigative pieces. We didn’t do enough good reads. We didn’t do enough of what readers valued.

2. On Digital Innovation:

We didn’t build an inviting, informative, smart community, which is dumb of us because newsrooms are places where smart, creative, fun people work.

3. On Listening:

Had we met with members of the community — readers and non-readers – to listen, learn and improve every other month, perhaps we wouldn’t be in as much trouble as we are.

” the people “ “The laughter of freedom has no borders or nationality” “hand in hand” “the anonymous activists” “Happiness is coming to our streets and homes”

A Small Group of Syrians

FJP: Syrian photographer Jaber Al Azmeh’s latest work takes the government’s newspaper to share the revolution’s thoughts. It’s quite astounding. 

The project’s description, as found on Azmeh’s Facebook page:

A small group of Free Syrians offer their words…. This project takes on one of the Syrian Government’s most prominent symbols – The Ba’ath Newspaper – as part and parcel of the Baath Security State – and here turns it upside down to be a surface of new thoughts written by the Syrian people thus overturning the daily chronicle of government lies. We emphasize also that the comments are directed not particularly to the Ba’ath but rather to ‘The Regime’ itself. Each participant was invited to use the news paper or write some words to symbolize his or her thoughts within the general idea of the revolution. Those are Syrians; Here are their words. This project began from the earliest months of the revolution. It was a time when the camera was, and continues to be, one of the revolution’s most important weapons. It was also important to work in simple and easily accessible ways while remaining discreet and not attracting too much attention. Participating in this project gave birth to new friendships, as has the revolution itself, in bringing together diverse Syrian individuals and their talks of revolution and freedom with all the complex emotional mix they entail – ecstasy, sadness and determination – they proudly express their allegiance to the one homeland, Syria.

(H/T to kawrage for the original Tumblr post)

(via globalvoices)