Posts tagged ny times

"Occupation, Not Culture, Is Holding Palestinians Back"

iradeh:

By Palestinian businessman Munib Masri

EARLIER this week, while Israel’s cheerleaders and Las Vegas casino moguls were parsing every syllable uttered by Mitt Romney in Jerusalem as fastidiously as the Olympic judges were scrutinizing every back flip in London, millions of Palestinians issued a giant collective yawn.

The most excellent (and accurate) first line to a New York Times article ever. Worth a read.

FJP: It is a pretty great first sentence.

So you want to be a journalist?

(via)

FJP: Happy Sunday, and good luck with your journalistic aspirations.

NY Times Introduces Chinese Language News Site
via:

[The site is] intended to draw readers from the country’s growing middle class, what The Times in its news release called “educated, affluent, global citizens.’’
The site will feature about 30 articles a day on national, foreign and arts topics, as well as editorials. Joseph Kahn, the paper’s foreign editor, said that about two-thirds of the content would be translated from Times articles and one-third would be written by Chinese editors and local freelance journalists.
The Times Company, which is well aware of the censorship issues that can come up in China, stressed that it would not become an official Chinese media company. The Times has set up its server outside China and the site will follow the paper’s journalistic standards. Mr. Kahn said that while the Chinese government occasionally blocked certain articles from nytimes.com, he was hopeful that the Chinese government would be receptive to the Chinese-language project.
In the past few years, many Western publishers have been expanding into China, drawn especially by the promise of luxury advertising aimed at the country’s growing affluent class. So far, the Times site has attracted Bloomingdale’s, Salvatore Ferragamo, Cartier and Milstein China, the real estate company, as advertisers, according to Denise F. Warren, chief general manager of nytimes.com and chief advertising officer for The Times.
Advertising sales will be run out of New York, with help from Cesanamedia on sales in China and Italy. Ms. Warren said she hoped that the range of advertisers would increase in the coming months.
“It’s generally luxury manufacturers,” she said. “But I believe there will also be an opportunity for corporate and financial advisers. We believe we will be reaching a global, well-educated, international audience.”

FJP: Nope, readers won’t have to pay for content (yet). It is pretty neat to see the NY Times in Chinese but this whole thing also feels a bit uncomfortably consumerist. Unsurprising considering China’s very quickly growing class of consumers. The site went live Thursday and you can view it here or click-through the screenshot above.

NY Times Introduces Chinese Language News Site

via:

[The site is] intended to draw readers from the country’s growing middle class, what The Times in its news release called “educated, affluent, global citizens.’’

The site will feature about 30 articles a day on national, foreign and arts topics, as well as editorials. Joseph Kahn, the paper’s foreign editor, said that about two-thirds of the content would be translated from Times articles and one-third would be written by Chinese editors and local freelance journalists.

The Times Company, which is well aware of the censorship issues that can come up in China, stressed that it would not become an official Chinese media company. The Times has set up its server outside China and the site will follow the paper’s journalistic standards. Mr. Kahn said that while the Chinese government occasionally blocked certain articles from nytimes.com, he was hopeful that the Chinese government would be receptive to the Chinese-language project.

In the past few years, many Western publishers have been expanding into China, drawn especially by the promise of luxury advertising aimed at the country’s growing affluent class. So far, the Times site has attracted Bloomingdale’s, Salvatore Ferragamo, Cartier and Milstein China, the real estate company, as advertisers, according to Denise F. Warren, chief general manager of nytimes.com and chief advertising officer for The Times.

Advertising sales will be run out of New York, with help from Cesanamedia on sales in China and Italy. Ms. Warren said she hoped that the range of advertisers would increase in the coming months.

“It’s generally luxury manufacturers,” she said. “But I believe there will also be an opportunity for corporate and financial advisers. We believe we will be reaching a global, well-educated, international audience.”

FJP: Nope, readers won’t have to pay for content (yet). It is pretty neat to see the NY Times in Chinese but this whole thing also feels a bit uncomfortably consumerist. Unsurprising considering China’s very quickly growing class of consumers. The site went live Thursday and you can view it here or click-through the screenshot above.

Kids Draw the News
Drawing by Violet Newman, age 7, Brooklyn.
via NY Times:

We are excited to announce the debut of a new feature on City Room today: Kids Draw the News, in which we ask the children in the audience to render a current event in pictorial form.
Today’s assignment: The spectacular brawl in the Tap Room of the New York Athletic Club. Please have your children-artists read the article or read/summarize it for them. Talking points: fancy restaurant/bar, men and women dressed up, people punching each other, throwing glasses, overturning tables, arrests. (I took the liberty this morning of asking my daughter to provide the example above.)

FJP: This will be interesting. I think I’d prefer the drawings that kids come up with on their interpretation, when their parents don’t summarize the story.—Jihii

Kids Draw the News

Drawing by Violet Newman, age 7, Brooklyn.

via NY Times:

We are excited to announce the debut of a new feature on City Room today: Kids Draw the News, in which we ask the children in the audience to render a current event in pictorial form.

Today’s assignment: The spectacular brawl in the Tap Room of the New York Athletic Club. Please have your children-artists read the article or read/summarize it for them. Talking points: fancy restaurant/bar, men and women dressed up, people punching each other, throwing glasses, overturning tables, arrests. (I took the liberty this morning of asking my daughter to provide the example above.)

FJP: This will be interesting. I think I’d prefer the drawings that kids come up with on their interpretation, when their parents don’t summarize the story.—Jihii

It’s a really hard time for newspapers of all kinds. This is the Voice‘s business model and I hate to undermine it. But for anybody who loves journalism: How can you fund that journalism with sex trafficking?

Nicholas Kristof, NY Times op-ed columnist.

Kristof recently published two columns (January 25 and March 17) criticizing online classifieds, especially Backpage.com, for their adult services section as a vehicle for pimps trying to sell girls. Backpage.com is owned by Village Voice Media, and in line with past criticism against sex ads on Backpage.com, Village Voice responded with criticism of Kristof’s fact-checking. In reality, can they afford to eliminate these Backpage.com ads?

Backpage.com rakes in $22 M. annually from prostitution advertising, according to media analysts at AIM. Backpage.com reportedly accounts for one-seventh of VVM’s revenue overall.

(full story via The New York Observer)

The paradox in this story is what Village Voice actually stands for. Kristof writes:

Village Voice began as an alternative newspaper to speak truth to power. It publishes some superb journalism. So it’s sad to see it accept business from pimps in the greediest and most depraved kind of exploitation.

His columns are a call to action:

True, many prostitution ads on Backpage are placed by adult women acting on their own without coercion; they’re not my concern. Other ads are placed by pimps: the Brooklyn district attorney’s office says that the great majority of the sex trafficking cases it prosecutes involve girls marketed on Backpage.

There are no simple solutions to end sex trafficking, but it would help to have public pressure on Village Voice Media to stop carrying prostitution advertising. The Film Forum has already announced that it will stop buying ads in The Village Voice. About 100 advertisers have dropped Rush Limbaugh’s radio show because of his demeaning remarks about women. Isn’t it infinitely more insulting to provide a forum for the sale of women and girls?

What's the etiquette on commenting on a colleague's post?

A piece by FJP contributor, Dave Burdick, in which he raises some interesting questions (inspired by an exchange on Daily Camera) about commenting etiquette:

  • Do or should colleagues hold themselves to a different standard than the everyman commenter?
  • Is there a place for publicly commenting on a colleague’s style?
  • Is there a place for publicly commenting on a colleague’s accuracy?
  • Does it serve journalists better to be asked these questions publicly? 
  • Does it serve news consumers better? 

Read Dave’s piece, and then read the comments below it. There, another interesting question (among many) is raised by Ian Howell:

Another question to ask…is why a news website doesn’t curate their own comments section. It may be a human resources issue, as Laura referenced above, but the absence of an obvious “policy of community standards” on the website makes me wonder if any thought has been given to it? 

He then points to the NY Times comments policy, which moderates comments. 

Thanks for opening the discussion, Dave! 

The Man Who Stayed Behind

(via The New York Times)

The Op-Ed columnist Nicholas D. Kristof talks with Ryan Boyette, a Florida man who braves bombs to document atrocities in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains.

Boyette:

There is no way we could have left and said we hope that you make it out on the other end of this okay. So we decided to stay and we decided to form a team and report what was happening.

Kristof:

To its credit, the Obama administration is working hard to end the food blockade in Nuba. But Boyette is skeptical, as am I, that the measures under consideration will be enough to avert starvation. If Boyette has anything to do with it, images of Nuba—courage, resilience, and suffering—will make it into American living rooms and build the political will for Washington and the world to take firm action.

5 minute video. Powerful work.

 
Meet Deep Dive, the New York Times’ experimental context engine and story explorer

Using an article as a jumping-off point, Deep Dive can create a custom, contextual feed that will allow readers to follow topics in the news.
Deep Dive uses the Times’ massive cache of metadata from stories to go, as the name suggests, deeper into a news event by pulling together related articles. So instead of performing a search yourself within the Times and weeding out off-topic results, Deep Dive would provides readers a collection of stories relating to a topic, based on whatever person, place, event or topic of their choosing. So let’s say you’re interested in protests in Yemen, with Deep Dive you could use an article from nytimes.com as a seed and let the system collect a history of previous items relating to news from the region.

Really interesting tool.  When I was in Studio 20, we examined “explainer journalism” in detail. A huge part of an explainer is being able to find the history of the story easily so that you can bring yourself up to date on the issue in the new article.
continue reading at Nieman Journalism Lab

Meet Deep Dive, the New York Times’ experimental context engine and story explorer

Using an article as a jumping-off point, Deep Dive can create a custom, contextual feed that will allow readers to follow topics in the news.

Deep Dive uses the Times’ massive cache of metadata from stories to go, as the name suggests, deeper into a news event by pulling together related articles. So instead of performing a search yourself within the Times and weeding out off-topic results, Deep Dive would provides readers a collection of stories relating to a topic, based on whatever person, place, event or topic of their choosing. So let’s say you’re interested in protests in Yemen, with Deep Dive you could use an article from nytimes.com as a seed and let the system collect a history of previous items relating to news from the region.

Really interesting tool.  When I was in Studio 20, we examined “explainer journalism” in detail. A huge part of an explainer is being able to find the history of the story easily so that you can bring yourself up to date on the issue in the new article.

continue reading at Nieman Journalism Lab

Here’s and excerpt of Clay Shirky’s take on Brisbane’s question via The Guardian’s Comment is Free.

This is what was so extraordinary about his original question: he is evidently so steeped in newsroom culture that he does not understand – literally, does not understand, as we know from his subsequent clarifications – that this is not a hard question at all, considered from thereaders’ perspective. Readers do not care about the epistemological differences between lies and weasel words; we want newspapers to limit the ability of politicians to make dubious assertions without penalty. Judging from the reactions to his post, most of us never understood that this wasn’t the newspapers’ self-conceived mission in the first place.

Continue reading on the Guardian.

Here’s and excerpt of Clay Shirky’s take on Brisbane’s question via The Guardian’s Comment is Free.

This is what was so extraordinary about his original question: he is evidently so steeped in newsroom culture that he does not understand – literally, does not understand, as we know from his subsequent clarifications – that this is not a hard question at all, considered from thereaders’ perspective. Readers do not care about the epistemological differences between lies and weasel words; we want newspapers to limit the ability of politicians to make dubious assertions without penalty. Judging from the reactions to his post, most of us never understood that this wasn’t the newspapers’ self-conceived mission in the first place.

Continue reading on the Guardian.

Q&A with NY Time’s Nicholas Kristof - the first blogger for the NY Times website

Nicholas Kristof has been writing for The New York Times for more than a quarter century and has appeared on that paper’s op-ed page since 2001, often penning articles about the struggles of people in distant parts of the world. He has even been dubbed the “moral conscience” of his generation of journalists. Less well known is his role as an innovator in journalism. In 2003, he became the first blogger for The New York Times website. Ever since then, Kristof has been a pioneer among journalists in the digital world. He’s active on Twitter and Facebook. In 2012, he even plans to venture into online gaming.

Via Fastcompany  

Q&A with NY Time’s Nicholas Kristof - the first blogger for the NY Times website

Nicholas Kristof has been writing for The New York Times for more than a quarter century and has appeared on that paper’s op-ed page since 2001, often penning articles about the struggles of people in distant parts of the world. He has even been dubbed the “moral conscience” of his generation of journalists. Less well known is his role as an innovator in journalism. In 2003, he became the first blogger for The New York Times website. Ever since then, Kristof has been a pioneer among journalists in the digital world. He’s active on Twitter and Facebook. In 2012, he even plans to venture into online gaming.

Via Fastcompany  

Purchase a one-year subscription to NYtimes.com and get a free Nook.
via The Wallblog

Purchase a one-year subscription to NYtimes.com and get a free Nook.

via The Wallblog

Monetizing Digital Content: Paul Smurl, Vice President, NYTimes.com, talks about the NYTimes.com digital strategy.

This video is from a panel discussion our sister site, ScribeMedia.org, produced with the MIT Enterprise Forum in NYC last week.

To watch all the speakers, including a VC that invests in media companies, Zuora, which powers pay media strategies for various media properties, Glenn Beck’s subscription site TheBlaze.com, and Teleshuttle, visit ScribeMedia.org

The New Yorker did a great profile on Jill Abramson in true New Yorker fashion.  Read it now for free.  For a young, female journalist, Abramson is truly inspiring; and for digital journalism enthusiasts out there, Abramson is making a huge push to take advantage of the web as a multimedia publication platform. We’ll see how she does but I’m hopeful. ~Chao @cli6cli6

The New Yorker did a great profile on Jill Abramson in true New Yorker fashion.  Read it now for free.  For a young, female journalist, Abramson is truly inspiring; and for digital journalism enthusiasts out there, Abramson is making a huge push to take advantage of the web as a multimedia publication platform. We’ll see how she does but I’m hopeful. ~Chao @cli6cli6

Why I Write: Q. and A. With Seven Times Journalists

Seven Times reporters from a variety of beats told us what they write, how, and why — even if, for at least one of them, the storytelling is more often done through multimedia than words.

via NY Times